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  • How To Get The Most From Your Pneumatic Staple Gun

    Are you learning how to use a pneumatic stapler? Get the most out of your staple gun - find out how right here on the Nail Gun Network, by Nail Gun Depot.
    Let's start with loading the tool. Loading a staple gun can vary from tool to tool; however, the following provides general instruction for loading a typical pneumatic stapler.

    Before you start, it's crucial that you have the proper staples. The type of staple that your tool takes will vary from model to model, and manufacturer to manufacturer. Check your tool's specs or manual if you are confused about the type of staple it takes.You can also search for your tool's staples using the Fastener Finder on NGD.

    Once you have identified the correct staples, you need to load them. Most staple guns come in either a top or bottom loading variation. Medium and heavy wire pneumatic staplers generally load from the top, while most fine wire staplers load from the bottom.

    Before loading, be sure to disconnect the air supply and keep the stapler pointed away from you at all times - as you should for any firing tool.

    For a top loading stapler, pull the magazine follower back until it locks into position. After the follower is locked into position, place the strip of staples over the magazine rail. The staples should move freely, back and forth on the rail. The last step is to unlock the follower and release it - so that it pushes the staples into the nose of the staple gun for firing.

    If you have a bottom load stapler, locate the release first - which is generally found at the rear of magazine. Depress the release and slide the magazine rail away from the nose. Turn the stapler upside down and insert the staples into the channel, towards the nose of the stapler. Make sure the pointed ends of the staples are loaded - so they will fire into your application. After the staples have been loaded, slide the magazine rail back, towards the nose, until it locks into place. Now you are ready to connect your air supply and test fire.

    Staple guns are designed for a variety of applications, from upholstering furniture to decking and siding applications. With more than 200 available options on NGD, we're confident you can find the right stapler to get your project done right.

    Your Source For Staple Gun Knowledge,
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
    Read More
  • The Nail Gun Buyer's Guide

    If you've come to the Nail Gun Depot, chances are you know what a nail gun is, what it does, and how it is used. Nailers come in a variety of shapes and sizes, designed to fulfill tasks that range from framing to finishing to flooring - depending on the user's needs. With a variety of options available, which tool is right for you? Find out the features you need, to take on the projects you want to build, right here.

     

    Let's start by covering the types of nail guns or nailers you might encounter:

    From top-to-bottom, the largest of the nail gun family is the framing nailer. Framing nailers are built to tackle large jobs that require heavy duty fasteners (nails) - such as framing, fencing and pallet building. The industries that benefit most from this type of tool include home-building, construction and manufacturing. Similar to the framing nailer, roofing nailers are almost identical in appearance, however these nail guns are designed specifically to fastening roofing shingles.

    For projects that are a bit less intense, finish nailers are recommended for jobs such as door and window trim, paneling, baseboard, casing, crown molding, furniture, shelving and cabinetry. A close relative to finish nail guns, brad nailers drive an even smaller - brad - nail, and are designed for small trim work and furniture repair. Typically, using a brad nail gun will prevent the need for wood putty to cover up a hole where the fastener has been driven - but these nailers can only be used on lighter-duty projects, since the fastener is not as large as a finish nail. Last but not least, a pin nailer might be your best option for crafting or small trim projects, such as cabinet doors and bird house building. For anyone in renovation or remodeling, having a good finish and brad nailer is key to success.

    Designed specifically for hardwood and laminate floor installation, floor nailers are the last of the commonplace nail guns that most contractors or DIYer's will require. These nailers are built to install a variety of hardwood floor sizes and thicknesses. Typically activated with a mallet, floor nailers are only built for flooring applications. Find Your Nailer Now

     

    Pneumatic or Cordless?

    The age old debate between contractors, do I want a cordless nailer or a pneumatic, air-powered nail gun? Most heavy-duty nail gun users swear by pneumatic tools, as they are generally a bit more reliable and do not require re-charging on the job site. The downside to a pneumatic tool, it requires the use of an air compressor. For workshop woodworkers, using nailers such as finish, brad and pin models, a small compressor such as the Senco PC1010 will be more than capable. For heavy-duty, high-intensity use on a construction site, look to a larger compressor such as the Senco PC0970, as it has a larger tank and is capable of providing enough air-pressure for larger tools - including framing nailers.

    If you choose a cordless nail gun, you will need to keep a battery charger handy to keep your tool running - once the battery wears down. Cordless framing nailers also require a fuel cell to provide the necessary pressure to drive a fastener. The benefit to a cordless tool, you can reach beyond the length of an air hose and can get into tighter, hard to reach areas. You also eliminate the need for an air compressor with a battery-powered nailing tool. This is generally the appeal that makes these types of tools desirable to DIY builders.

     

    Terms to look for when shopping for your next nail gun:

    You'll more than likely encounter some - or all - of the following terms, when comparing nailers.One of the most important features you will want to look for, an adjustable depth of drive lets you select how far you want your nail (or other fastener) driven into the object you are fastening. Another option to look for, directional exhaust plates allow you to select the direct your tool shoots it's exhaust - this feature is particularly beneficial in dusty areas. Last, but not least, you will also want to be sure your nailer has a jam clearing feature - to avoid lost time and/or costly repairs if/when your tool jams.

    Depending on the job your are working on, pay attention to features such as trigger size (if you wear gloves while working), easy adjustment for different nail or fastener sizes, and a rugged exterior design to handle the projects you throw at your nailer.

    Keep an eye out for brands such as Senco, Paslode, Hitachi, Bostitch and MAX, as these manufacturers all have a strong track record for building reliable, long-lasting tools. Also keep an eye out for the length of warranty offered by a manufacturer. Most brands will come with a one-year limited warranty, but certain tools go above and beyond - such as Senco's XP (XtremePro) line of nailers that include a five-year limited warranty, or Bostitch's seven-year limited warranty that is offered on select tools.

     

    Your Leading Source For Nail Gun Knowledge,

    The Team At Nail Gun Depot

    Read More
  • What's A Framing Nailer?

    Framing nailers are designed to tackle the obvious - framing - but did you know they can be useful for other applications? Uses can include anything from framing to sheathing, sub-flooring, truss building and decks. If you work in a construction or renovation trade, chances are you have worked with a framing nailer at least once. Let's take a look at how a framing nail gun works, its uses, and different options available on the market today.
     
    Paslode CF325Li
     
    One of the most important woodworking tools on a home-building site, the framing gun will allow you to drive framing nails into support structures without hesitation. These nail guns are designed for heavy-duty use - and can drive a row of fasteners faster than many woodworkers can hammer one framing nail. As with any tool, framing nailer safety is one of the most important practices you should follow. For more information on nail gun safety, check out our previous blog post here.
     
    If you are researching different framing nailers, you will find that there are two primary types available - cordless or pneumatic. Cordless framing nailers are powered by a compressed-air fuel cell, paired with a rechargeable battery, such as the Paslode CF325Li (replaced by Paslode CF325XP). The older, more traditional sibling, a pneumatic framing nail gun (also known as air-powered), generates its energy through an air compressor, such as the Senco FramePro 325XP. Either of these tool variations are perfect for the job site. A cordless framing gun will typically cost more than its pneumatic counterpart, however, you will find that it is much more flexible to use, as it isn't restricted to the length of an air hose. Consider how versatile you need your nailer to be when shopping for a new one.
     
    Senco FramePro 325XP
     
    A typical framing nailer will be available with either a bump-fire or single-shot mechanism, which will allow you to select between how you trigger a nail to be driven. Bump-firing allows you to suppress the nailer's trigger and continuously drive nails as the gun moves across a section of wood. Single-firing, on the other hand, requires you pull the trigger each time you fire a nail. As a safety precaution, almost every new nail gun will require that the nose be pressed against a surface, in order to fire a nail.
     
    Hitachi NV83A4
     
    The magazine is another area of consideration, when shopping for a framing gun. Depending on your line of work, you will want to consider the benefit of a strip nailer versus a coil nailer. Typically, construction workers and builders who work in high-volume fastening environments prefer the coil nailer, such as the Hitachi NV83A4, as it allows for a larger magazine capacity - which increases productivity. A DIYer or light-use builder might prefer the strip nailer, such as the MAX SN883RH2 (replaced by MAX SN883RH3), as it is lighter weight, easier to load, and generally a bit more versatile. The biggest consideration between a strip or coil nail gun is magazine capacity - just be certain you are purchasing the correct nail for your gun.
     
    MAX SN883RH2
     
    If you need some help identifying the right nail for your nailer, use our Fastener Finder tool on Nail Gun Depot.
     
    Helping You "Nail" Your Next Fastening Tool Purchase,
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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  • Troubleshooting Air Leaks On A Pneumatic Tool

    Have you ever tried firing a pneumatic nailer, only to hear air leak when pulling the trigger? If so, you're not alone. Over time, wear and tear will take its toll on any air tool, regardless of the brand. The best way to prevent an issue on the job, practice preventative maintenance. Keeping pneumatic tools properly lubricated with air tool oil, as well as cleaning them regularly will help prevent wear. Storing tools in plastic helps to keep dust and other elements out - especially when sitting for extended periods of time.
    But what about the unavoidable issues, like an occasional air leak?
    If you try to fire a pneumatic nail gun or stapler, but only hear air leaking when engaging the trigger, it's likely that your tool's "O-Ring" is not sealing properly. When the trigger is not depressed, you may not hear air leaking, as the valve is probably sealed. However, once you engage the trigger, the valve looses its seal, therefore creating a gap for the escaping air you hear coming from your air compressor, as it flows into the tool.
    On a properly working pneumatic tool, when air is forced into the firing valve, this pushes the valve upward, which opens the main cylinder sleeve and allows the air to drive a fastener. If the "O-Ring" fails to seal, the air will escape, creating your leak.
    While this may seem to be a complex repair, don't get rid of your tool just yet - fixing the issue may be easier than you think. Simply stretch the "O-Ring" on the firing valve and apply grease. This should take care of the issue - helping your air tool run properly. Keeping a tool's "O-Ring" lubricated will increase the ring's lifespan, and prevent drying out.
    We must note, this is not the only cause for a pneumatic nailer or stapler to leak air, just a common source when troubleshooting a leak.
    Always remember to stop using your air-powered tool - or any tool - when it is not functioning properly. Take your tool to a certified repair technician or complete any necessary adjustments yourself, before using the tool again. Failure to take the necessary preventative measures can result in injury, or can lead to further damaging of your tool.
    Like this article? You may want to learn more about choosing the right air compressor for your application. An under-powered compressor can also lead to misfire or weak firing of your pneumatic nailer.
    Here's To Many Years Of Service From Your Pneumatic,
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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  • Practicing Nail Gun & Power Tool Safety

    You have your nailer, stapler or screw gun; you have the proper accessories to tackle your project – but do you practice safety awareness when using your tools? Most job related accidents can be avoided, if you take the proper measures to ensure safety on the job site.

     

    For a 58 year-old carpenter living in Minnesota, a simple mistake almost cost his life, when he accidentally fired a 3-1/2” galvanized framing nail directly into his heart. While building a deck, the man’s framing nailer slipped out of his hands – and when he caught hold of it, hand still on the trigger, the gun’s nose bumped against his chest and fired directly into his heart. Thankfully, the nail missed his main arteries by millimeters, and he survived the ordeal after surgery, avoiding a lethal scenario. You can read the entire story here.

     

    The nail was a lucky miss, but let’s take a look at how this accident could have been avoided. In this example, a simple error could have completely altered the outcome, if the man had removed his hand from the trigger. Even bump action guns still require a suppressed trigger to fire, a safety feature most manufacturers include on their tools. If you feel as if you are going to loose hold of your nail gun or other tool, always take your hand off the trigger. Worst case, a broken tool is better than a life altering injury.

     

    A factor that helped to save this man’s life – staying calm and avoiding panic. Panic increases blood flow, which can increase bleeding from open wounds. In this example where a heart was pierced, panicking could have further reduced his ability to breath, leading to hyperventilation. Staying calm and contacting emergency medical services immediately will improve chances of survival, in life threatening situations. Treat for shock while help is on its way.

     

    As described in the instance above, nail guns are powerful tools, so let’s make sure you are set up for success, which starts with safe handling:

     

    • Start by knowing your tool and how it functions. Read the owner’s manual and look at warnings listed by the manufacturer.
    • Wear the appropriate safety gear for your job site. Safety glasses should always be worn, regardless of the project. Depending on your line of work, a hardhat, hearing protection, harness or gloves might also be required.
    • ALWAYS keep your tool pointed away from yourself and anyone else, especially when activated. When in doubt, treat your nail gun as you would treat any other firearm.
    • Don’t use a tool that is not functioning properly. Have any broken or damaged tool serviced before trying to use.
    • Do not try to drive fasteners on top of other fasteners. This can lead to misfire or backfire – resulting in injury.

     

    There is no guarantee that injury will not occur when handling your tools – on and off the job site – but practicing safety measures, such as the ones mentioned above, will increase your odds of avoiding injury and staying safe when using your nail gun or other tools.

     

    Stay Safe,

    The Team At Nail Gun Depot

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  • Choosing An Air Compressor For Pneumatic Tools

    We've talked a lot about pneumatic tools, such as nailers and staple guns, but what about the compressors that bring these tools to life? The air compressor you use can make or break your business, so it makes sense that you want to use a compressor that is durable, reliable and capable of providing the right amount of air pressure to your tool.

    Air compressors range in price, based on a variety of criteria including size, power and available features. Smaller units, such as Senco's PC1010 portable air compressor, run for $119 on Nail Gun Depot, whereas larger, more powerful units, such as Rol-Air's 7722HK28 nine horsepower compressor, has a price of $1,599 on Nail Gun Depot.

    Senco PC1010

    The first criteria to determine which compressor is right for you - where will it be used? Make sure to choose a compressor with the correct voltage for the space it will be used in. Always operate your electric compressor as close to its source of power as possible. If an extension cord must be used, consider using a heavy duty cord. If electricity is not accessible on the job site, you might find it easier to use a gas powered compressor. Gas powered compressors are generally more powerful as well - which might be useful for heavy duty projects.

    Rol-Air 7722HK28

    Next, you need to determine the appropriate tank size. Contrary to what some believe, tank size does not affect the amount of air delivered, but it does influence how much the motor runs. Planning to use more than one tool at the same time? You will probably want a compressor with a larger tank. The more tools connected, the more air pressure that is being used. If you want to reduce the amount of strain on the motor, consider a larger tank size. However, remember that a larger tank might reduce portability.

    Some models also come with available features, such as multi-tool use with the Bostitch CAP2060P (replaced by Bostitch BTFP02012), trays and attachments for tools and fasteners with the Bostitch CAP1512-OF, or low operating noise with the Bostitch BTFP02011 (replaced by Bostitch BTFP02012).

    Bostitch CAP1512-OF

    Oil-less or lubricated? Most conventional compressors require regular monitoring of oil levels, which can be a burden if you have multiple people using the same compressor, traveling from job to job. Just as a car, if oil is not replenished, the motor will seize. There is an upside to lubricated air compressors though - they are typically more durable and capable of heavy use. If you are an amateur DIYer, you might find the oil-less compressor more suitable to your needs - if it is only intended for occasional use. Oil-less compressors typically work best with lower volume, less intense use - but don't worry, they still can pack a punch.

     

    Buying a reputable brand, such as Senco, Bostitch or Rol-Air can provide additional peace of mind - and generally brands such as these offer a better warranty.

     
    Want more information about air compressors? Let Nail Gun Depot answer all of your questions and find the perfect compressor to meet your needs.
     

    Happy Hunting For Your Next Compressor,

    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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  • Nail Gun Basics

    Don't let using a nailer or nail gun be an intimidating experience... learn the basics right here on Nail Gun Depot!

    Step 1: Choose a Nail Gun

    • What type of project are you working on? Will you need a framing nail gun, brad nail gun (for light trim and molding, this gun shoots smaller nails that won’t split the wood and are less visible), trim nail gun (these nails are slightly thicker than brad nails), flooring nail gun, roofing nail gun or concrete nail gun? Choose the nail gun that is best for you. For most at home projects, such as decking and framing, you would want to choose a framing nail gun.
    • Strip or coil? This refers to the way the nails are collated. Strip nails come in a strip, coil nails in a coil. Coil nail guns allow for less reloading, as they hold more nails.  If you are doing a big job or are a professional, this is the way to go. Most DIYers choose a strip nail gun.

    Step 2:  Choose a Nail

    • Clipped head or full head? Clipped head nails are just what they sound like, part of the head has been clipped off. This allows the nails to be collated closer together, which means more nails in the strip and less reloading. The holding power does not differ much, however some coastal states still require full head nails for certain projects.
    • Galvanized or not? Galvanized nails are coated to resist rust and corrosion, so if you are completing an outdoor project or something that will be exposed to moisture, galvanized is what you want.

     

    Step 3: How Will You Power Your Nail Gun?

    • Nail guns can be powered by air, electricity, fuel or batteries. When you buy your nail gun you will need to know how it receives power. Most choose an air powered nail gun for its reasonable price point and ample power. However, air powered tools require an air compressor. Your nail gun will be attached to the compressor by a hose. Your compressor will be either gas powered or plug into the wall. You can purchase nailer kits with a compressor at Nail Gun Depot.

     

    Step 4: Load

    • Load your gun according to the instructions. This is a relatively simple process. The strip nail guns are similar to loading a stapler. Pull back the magazine, insert the nail strip, and release the magazine to allow tension on the nail strip. To load a coil nail gun, open the magazine - inside there will be an adjustable nail tray - set the tray for the length of nail that you are using. Insert the nail coil into the magazine. Toward the nose of the tool, you will find a “feed pawl” which guides the nails into the chamber - so be sure the wire and nail heads are aligned with the proper grooves.

     

    Step 5: Fire

    • Most nail guns will require the nose to be pressed against a surface to fire. This is a safety feature so that the gun is not accidentally shot. There are usually two choices for operation: bump fire and sequential. Sequential requires you to pull the trigger each time you want to shoot a nail. Bump fire eliminates the trigger and fires each time the nail gun is pressed up against a surface
    Now you are on your way to hassle free nailing!
     
    Your Source For Nailer Knowledge,
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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  • Welcome To Nail Gun Depot's Blog - The Nail Gun Network

    Nail Gun Depot is pleased to announce the re-launch of its blog and content library, coined "The Nail Gun Network" - or "Nail Gun Network" for short. Beginning as a basic tool and fastener blog that was launched in June 2011, Nail Gun Depot phased in the Nail Gun Network brand starting in 2014, in preparation for the brand's 15th anniversary. Please stay tuned for project tips, tool news and all-else relevant to the tool and fastener industry. Get great "how to" advice for DIY applications - and contractor-grade tips for the professionals.
    Nail Gun Depot's Nail Gun Network
    Have a topic you want us to talk about, drop us a line at sales@nailgundepot.com and tell us what you want to see on The Nail Gun Network.
     
    **This post has been modified and updated to reflect advancements at Nail Gun Depot. Original post was updated on February 10, 2015.
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