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How-To Instructions
How-To Instructions
  • What Cordless Nail Gun Should I Buy?

    It's hard to ignore the increasing presence of cordless tools coming to market. Today, let's take a look at those different types of cordless nailers. We'll look at brand, product application, and variation(s) of cordless technology available. Let's start by breaking down the core categories of cordless.

    Senco Cordless Battery

    Framing Nailers & Metal Connecting Nailers

     

    Cordless framing nailers have improved quite a bit since the first Paslode Impulse tool was released in July of 1986 - nearly 30 years ago to the day. Today, Paslode cordless tools have improved in every possible way: lighter body, longer battery life, quicker recharge time and more. The CF325XP (905600) is Paslode's current contender in a long running legacy of cordless framing tools. Powered by lithium-ion battery and orange framing fuel cell, the CF325XP is designed for heavy-duty, everyday use.

    Paslode CF325XP

    While Paslode has dominated this segment of the market for many years, another key player is quickly gaining notoriety for their contractor-grade cordless technology. That's right, we're talking about our friends at Dewalt. Currently on their second generation lithium-ion framing tool, Dewalt's MAX XR battery boasts more power and longevity than ever before. Dewalt has also managed to eliminate the need for a fuel cell, without compromising performance. Dewalt's system is as simple as plug-and-play. With the recent release of their DCN693M1 cordless metal connecting nailer - the first of its kind - we've got a hunch this won't be the last cordless nailer from Dewalt.

    Our Recommendation:

    If you don't mind occasionally replacing a fuel cell, Paslode has led cordless framing sales for decades. For tried and tested quality, Paslode is a sure shot.

    Dewalt DCN693 App

    If you're looking for the latest technology, there's no doubt that Dewalt offers a game changer. The MAX XR battery system eliminates the need for fuel cell, and offers improved driving force and length of time between charging cycles.

     

    Finish & Brad Nailers

     

    Unlike the cordless framing market, you'll see a lot more competition when comparing cordless finish and trim nailers. Two main factors dictate the widespread growth for this segment of the industry - market share and tool design. Generally speaking, the market for finish and trim nailers is infinite. Between contractors, weekend warriors, and woodworking hobbyists, there is always a demand for finish nailers. Paired with the fact they require much less energy to drive small finish or brad nails into place, you have a recipe for success.

    Grex Cordless Comparison Side-By-Side

    Just like the framing nailers above, most cordless finish nailers come in the same two variations, either with fuel cell and battery, or powered by battery only. Grex recently launched the GC1850 cordless brad nailer, which is powered by fuel cell and AAA battery power only! Don't worry about constantly replacing those AAA's in the Grex either, this cordless brad nailer is rated to run up to 50,000 shots per battery cycle.

    Looking at fuel cell finish nailers, Paslode once again leads the industry with its lineup of lithium-ion tools. Introduced to replace the aging line of Paslode Impulse nailers, these new lithium-ion powered tools are lean and efficient. The most recent addition to Paslode is their all-new 18 gauge brad nailer, the IM200Li (918000). Featuring several benefits over its predecessor, the Paslode IM200-F18 (901000), the IM200Li lithium-ion brad nailer offers a lightweight design, long-range battery life, battery standby position to conserve charge, tool free depth adjustment, reversible belt hook, and no mar tip - among other benefits.

    Dewalt DCN660D1 App

    Moving away from the fuel cell, Senco and Dewalt continue to battle for control of the battery-only market. A long-time leader in innovation, the Senco Fusion is available in four cordless variations ranging from 15 gauge finish nailer down to 18 gauge brad nailer. The Senco Fusion cordless system continues to receive praise for its innovative features and proprietary design. However, Dewalt recently answered the demand for better, more powerful batteries when they introduced the 20V MAX lithium-ion battery pack. Built to compete with Senco's Fusion, we've seen a growing demand for Dewalt's new product(s) - which includes their DCN660D1 16 gauge cordless finish nailer.

    The Verdict:

    Only time will tell the ultimate winners in this extremely competitive segment of cordless tools. As new technology continues to emerge, we expect to see several new products come to market in the next calendar year. We also predict a full transition to lithium-ion batteries, for those brands still offering NiCad models or similar.

    Senco Fusion F-15

    And, if you're a diehard air tool enthusiast, there's good news for you too. Despite advancements in cordless technology, we don't foresee pneumatic tools fading into the abyss any time soon. With a network of contractors and tradesmen that swear by pneumatic nailers and staplers, we have a hunch these tools will also benefit from enhanced technology and performance.

    So, would you consider cordless?

     

    ~The Team At Nail Gun Depot

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  • How To Install Radiant Floor Heating

    Homeowners ask, why upgrade to radiant floor heating? Picture this, it's a chilly morning and you take that first barefoot step onto a cold tile floor. The touch sends a chill straight through your body.

    Radiant Floor Heating

    If you're fed-up with frigid floors, there's an alternative - radiant floor heating. Not only a benefit to your feet, heated flooring is a popular selling feature among prospective home buyers. And, installation is easier than you think.

    PROJECT NOTE: You will have to remove your existing outer flooring when installing above the sub-floor. If you aren't prepared to re-tile or replace existing floors, don't start without the proper budget, materials and professional guidance. When installing above sub-floor, you will also have to cover the radiant heating grid with a layer of gypsum - or concrete - once the heating unit has been properly secured to the sub-floor. Any flooring material installed above the layer of gypsum can be installed as you would install flooring over a concrete surface.

    Spotnails Radiant Floor App

    Compared to other methods, such as hot water heating or forced air, radiant floor systems disperse warmth evenly, as they are designed to cover a maximum square footage for any given space. Typically used in tile bathrooms, radiant heat can be used in other areas of the home that present the proper conditions for installation.

    PROJECT TIP: Before installation, confirm all electrical and structural specifications for the space you are working meet code. We recommend contacting a licensed electrician and general contractor to ensure your project is being completed both safely and legally. Confirm that the addition of radiant heating will not overload your existing circuits or create another hazard. Be sure to follow the installation instructions and consult professional expertise as required. Never work with live wires.

    When ready to start, installation can be done two ways, either above the sub-floor or below it. In either instance, you'll need to make sure the radiant mat is stapled into place and secured to the sub-floor before proceeding. Spotnails offers two tools designed specifically for radiant flooring installation, the X1S1640RFH and the X1S3640RFH. Both of these wide crown construction staplers are designed specifically for the installation of radiant flooring.

    Spotnails Radiant Floor Stapler

    Installing your radiant heating system above the sub-floor? Spotnails offers an attachable pogo stick (AS-99090), which eliminates the need to bend over for stapling. Simply place the tool's nose on your desired point of fastening, and pull the walking stick's trigger to activate.

    As we mentioned earlier, once the wiring has been harnessed, connected and tested per your radiant flooring mat manufacturer's instruction, you will need to protect the radiant heating system by either installing insulation (for under sub-floor radiant flooring), or by adding a layer of gypsum (over sub-floor radiant floor installation).

    Ready to heat your feet? Share your experience with radiant flooring below.

    ~The Team At Nail Gun Depot

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  • Tools For Your Trade - The Complete List

    Ever find yourself looking to purchase a new tool, but not quite sure which one will suit your project best? Instead of forcing a square peg into a round hole, take a look at Senco's tool and trade chart below. Then, find the corresponding tools by visiting Nail Gun Depot's "Shop By Project" application builder.

    Step One: Identify Your Application

    Senco Tools For Trades

    Step Two: Narrow Down The Right Tool Using Our "Shop By Project" Application Builder

    Nail Gun Depot Shop By Project

    Finding and comparing the right tool for your project is easier than ever on Nail Gun Depot. Give it a shot, and let us know what you think below!

    ~The Team At Nail Gun Depot

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  • Introducing The All-New Nail Gun Depot Website

    Welcome to the all-new Nail Gun Depot - your everything source for fastening and construction supply. Whether you're looking for a tool, fastener, how-to advice or expert tips - we've got it all. With competition online as fierce as ever, we're going the extra mile for our customers - ensuring you get the right product for your project, at a competitive price.

    Nail Gun Depot Website

    Don't take our word for it, check out some of the great new features all visitors can enjoy on Nail Gun Depot:

    • Search The Nail Gun Network: The new Nail Gun Network has truly become a site within a site. More than a blog, choose between how-to articles, video demonstrations, manufacturer bulletins, tool news, expert tips and so much more. We've listened to you, and have designed our Nail Gun Network to offer each user a personalized experience.

    NGN NEW SITE

    • Navigate On Your Smartphone: We've finally gone mobile. Shop Nail Gun Depot from any smartphone or tablet via our new mobile layout. Get the same great information from your desktop computer - now at the tip of your finger.

    MOBILE NEW SITE

    • Shop By Project Type: For customers that don't quite know what they need, but know what they need to do, visit Nail Gun Depot's new product recommendation tool - Shop By Project. Another way to search for products, we've sorted items by the applications they are designed to excel at. With categories for concrete, decking, upholstery and more, let our Shop By Project tool pair you with the right items for your job.

    SBP NEW SITE

    • Browse The Fastener Finder: Along with the rest of Nail Gun Depot, we've given our one-of-a-kind Fastener Finder app a face-lift. Know which tool you own, but not sure what fasteners will work with it? Simply select the brand and model of your tool from the drop down menu, and let our Fastener Finder do the rest. With an expanded selection of both late-model tools and new release items, choose between more than 7,500 different product combinations.

    FF NEW SITE

    • Explore Our Freight Shipping Program: Want to buy in bulk, but not pay standard shipping rates? We have a solution for that. Nail Gun Depot now offers common-carrier, freight shipping options during checkout. Buying a skid of nails? Simply choose the freight quote that best suits you during checkout. Our logistics team will do the rest - making sure your products arrive without hassle.

    LTL NEW SITE

    • Enjoy Enhanced Customer Profiles: The new Nail Gun Depot is designed to optimize user experience from top to bottom. We've gone the extra mile to make sure our customers enjoy a seamless experience while visiting the site. Store contact information, reorder with the click of a button, manage customer preferences, submit product reviews, save products to order later, and more.

    ACCOUNT NEW SITE

    • Build A Custom Wishlist: Want a new tool, but not quite ready to place an order? Save it for later with Nail Gun Depot's new wishlist builder. Located within your user profile, store any product on the site for later, save comments on each item, and even share your wishlist with others via email.

    WISHLIST NEW SITE

    Want more? We've only just begun. Stay tuned as we continue to expand our product selection, and roll-out new features on Nail Gun Depot. Whether you're a contractor, expert, DIYer, amateur - or anywhere in between - we've got something for everyone on Nail Gun Depot and The Nail Gun Network.

    Have questions, comments or feedback, drop us a line at sales@nailgundepot.com.

     

    ~ The Team At Nail Gun Depot

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  • Choosing A Staple Gun For Your Project

    Everything you need to know about staple guns. Learn the difference between gauge and crown, what makes one type stapler different from another, and most importantly, which stapler is the best one for you.
    BeA Upholstery Stapler
    What Type Of Staple Gun Do I Need?
    • Construction Stapler: When you think of a staple gun, the first thought that might come to mind is a construction stapler - in other words, not your average office stapler. Most construction staplers look very similar to a nail gun, and they typically aren't far off in operation - that is, until you load your fasteners into the magazine. Construction staplers vary in size, depending on the project you need them for. Finish staplers are great for trim work - while heavy-duty construction staplers can be used for sheathing, cabinet framing, furniture construction and more.
    • Upholstery Stapler: Upholstery staplers and fine wire construction staplers maintain similar characteristics - in fact, there's even a slight category overlap in some 20 gauge models - so it's important that you make sure the tool you purchase is intended for the correct application. Some upholstery staplers are intended specifically for upholstering applications, while others leave some room for versatility. To make upholstering easier, some models of upholstery stapler come with a long nose, for reaching into tight spaces.
    • Flooring Stapler: Flooring staplers, again, look very much like their flooring nailer counterpart. Flooring staplers are designed for the installation of hardwood and engineered wood flooring. Hardwood floor staplers come in two variations - either mallet actuated or trigger actuated. A mallet actuated flooring stapler requires the strike of a rubber mallet to drive the staple into place. Carpet staplers are more of a mixture between hammer staplers and upholstery staplers.
    • Packing Stapler: Carton closing staplers - also known as packaging staplers - are designed specifically for corrugated box closing applications, typically associated with packing and shipping. Carton closing staplers come in several variations, ranging from air-powered (pneumatic), to cordless battery - or even manual - operation. The size of corrugate you are intending to staple will determine the size of staple and stapler you require. For applications in manufacturing or assembly line production, packaging staplers are also available in bench-mounted and clinch stapling variations, designed for repetitive, high-volume use.
    • Hammer Stapler: Hammer staplers, also known as hammer tackers or slap staplers, are manually actuated tools that require the striking of a surface to operate - in the same manner as a hammer. Hammer staplers are generally used in carpet, insulation, housewrap and roofing felt installation.
    • Cap Stapler: Cap staplers are most commonly found in the roofing industry. These specialty staplers operate the same as a regular staple gun, but also drive a plastic cap in tandem with the staple. The cap provides greater holding power and offers added protection for the staple. Cap staplers are used for roofing felt, housewrap, foam board and other select applications.
    Stinger Cap Stapler
    What Crown Stapler Should I Choose?
    • Narrow Crown: Narrow crown staplers are generally used for finish and trim applications, such as molding, trim, cabinets, drawers, fascias and other fine-grained applications. The smaller crown allows the stapler to penetrate a surface without being overly noticeable.
    • Medium Crown: Medium crown staplers are preferred in subflooring, pallet building, vinyl siding, furniture assembly, sheathing and similar applications. A medium crown offers a wider range of clinch, but is not quite as rugged as a wide crown.
    • Wide Crown: Wide crown staplers and staples are intended for heavy-duty use - primarily in construction, for projects in truss building, housewrap, roofing, lathing and more. Look to use a wide crown stapler for many of the same applications as a medium crown, but where it doesn't matter if the staple affects the appearance of your project. Wide crown staples are bulkier, but offer greater holding capability.
    C-Wire Staples
    What's The Difference In Wire (Gauge) Type?
    • Fine Wire: Fine wire staples are the thinnest variation of staple, generally ranging from 20 - 22 gauge in thickness. It's important to note, that the gauge and crown of staple are two different things. The gauge is the thickness of the staple, whereas the crown is the width.
    • Medium Wire: Medium wire staples are generally measured in the 18 - 19 gauge range of thickness. Medium wire will provide more holding power than a fine wire staple, but is not the best option for heavy-duty applications in construction.
    • Heavy Wire: Heavy wire staples are the thickest variation of staple, mostly found in 15 - 16 gauge thickness. Heavy wire will provide the greatest holding power of the three, but will also take up the most area when fastened. Heavy wire staples are good for applications that require stapling to a thick surface.

     

    Other clamp fastening tools serve as extended family to the staple gun, such as hog ring pliers, corrugated fastening tools and flaring staplers; however, these specialized tools are typically intended for industrial use or manufacturing.
    Bostitch Cordless Carton Stapler
    Just as you should with any other power tool, be sure that safety is your top priority when using a staple gun. Always be aware of your surroundings, how you handle the tool, and make sure you are equipped with the proper safety gear.
    ~The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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  • How To Buy The Right Air Compressor

    Have you found yourself asking, "How much air compressor do I really need?" If so, you've come to the right spot. Many are fooled into buying more - or less - air compressor than their tool(s) require. An easy solution, learn how to buy the right air compressor, by visiting Nail Gun Depot's, Nail Gun Network.
    Bostitch Compressor
    The following are points for consideration as you start your research:
    • Portability: We put portability at the top of our list, because despite performance and technical specs, if you can't take your compressor where it needs to go, it's useless. Think about the types of projects you are looking to do. Will there be room for a larger unit, or is space going to be limited? Will you have to carry the compressor up and down stairs, or will it always stay at ground level? Will you be using the compressor in a fixed work space, or will it move from job to job? A hand-carry air compressor will prove beneficial if you will be moving it up and down stairs, or if you have limited space to work with. Most DIYers will find that a hand-carry compressor will offer plenty of power for their finish nailer or stapler. These compressors are also handy for basic projects around the garage, such as inflating a tire or pumping up a basketball. Wheelbarrow compressors offer a significant increase in power, and are a better choice for heavy-duty use, but sacrifice some of the portability a hand-carry air compressor offers. Fixed compressors are large and powerful, but are not easily moved, and are not ideal outside a workshop or manufacturing facility.
    • Power & Performance: To make sure your compressor is powerful enough to handle the pneumatic tools you plan to hook up to it, check the specs on your tools to see how much air power they require. Most finish and trim nailers, staplers and the like, will require a lower Standard Cubic Feed Per Minute (SCFM) rating, while larger framing nailers and construction staplers typically need a higher SCFM rating to run. If you are planning to run multiple tools at the same time, you'll need a compressor that's designed to handle the additional load. Outside of providing power to your tools, you'll also need to decide whether you want an electric, or gas-powered air compressor. Most hand-carry compressors are only available as electric, but for larger wheelbarrow units and some fixed units, gasoline power is an option. Consider using a gas compressor if you find yourself frequently on the job without an electrical outlet available. Some gas-powered compressors will also offer increased power over their electric counterpart.
    • Pump & Tank Type: Most compressor shoppers will go straight for the motor output - without thinking about two other crucial components - the pump and the tank. The tank size - measured in gallons - determines how frequently the motor must run to keep air in reserve. Almost as crucial as the motor, the pump is responsible for moving air through the compressor. A single-stage compressor pumps air at the same output pressure, while two-stage compressors have multiple cylinders that continually compress air to provide improved tank filling capability. Be sure to note whether your compressor pump is oil-free, or if it requires regular oiling to keep moving parts lubricated. Larger compressors typically require oil lubrication as regular maintenance.
    • Reliability: The last point on our checklist, make sure the compressor you are buying has been built by a contractor-grade manufacturer. The "house-brand" compressor manufacturers come with an appealing price, but are likely to fall apart sooner than expected. In fact, most don't even come with the out-of-box quality that can be found in compressors from brands such as, RolAir, Senco, Bostitch, J-Air and similar. Buyer beware, make sure the compressor you decide on is designed to sustain several years of hard use.

    All things considered, how much air compressor DO YOU really need? The solution ultimately lies in the type of projects you work on, the pneumatic tools you are using, and the flexibility of your typical job site. Despite the size or design of the compressor you choose, keep long-term reliability in mind. Choosing a slightly more expensive, contractor-grade compressor, might pay for itself in the long run.

    RolAir Air Compressors
    Now, you won't have to worry about "blowing" your money on the next air compressor you purchase.
    ~The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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  • What Type Of Air Hose Do I Need For My Compressor?

    Imagine this scenario. You've purchased a new pneumatic tool, go to hook the tool up to your air compressor, only to find out you don't have the right air hose to connect your tool. You ask, what type of air hose do I need for my compressor? The question is simple - the answer, a bit more complex. Let's explore what type of air hose will suit your application best, when you enter the Nail Gun Network.
    Before getting into the different types of air hoses for an air compressor, you'll need to determine which size fitting your compressor requires. Most hoses for air compressors range in size from 1/4" to 1" in diameter. You should be able to find which hose diameter is suitable by looking at your air compressor. Some air compressors will allow you to use several different sized hoses, simply by switching out the hose fitting (where the hose and air compressor connect). Another point to think about, larger tools will require more air to power them, which means you'll need a compressor with more power.
    Coilhose Air Hose Fitting
    Next, you'll want to think about hose length. For a workshop, where the compressor and air tool(s) are kept close together and do not require extra reach, consider a 25' or 50' air hose. If you're a contractor on the construction site, 50' to 100' hoses typically work out better. Keep in mind, you'll still need the correct fittings to connect your air hose to the tool and compressor.
    The last thing to consider - also the area that offers the most "flexibility" in choosing an air hose - the material it's made from. Most air hoses on Nail Gun Depot are made from either polyurethane or rubber. For applications working with pneumatic tools, we generally recommend either of these materials. PVC and nylon air hoses are also available, but are generally less durable and are not intended for high-pressure usage. Rubber compressor hoses are fairly common, generally for home workshop use. Rubber material handles temperature change well, making it a suitable choice for powering an air tool. For more intense use, contractors generally prefer polyurethane air hoses, which also do well in extreme temperatures (warm and cold), but offer added flexibility with less risk of damage. Polyurethane has been found to stand up better to cuts, kinks and more, as a long-term investment.
    Coilhose Polyurethane Air Hose
    Interested in upgrading? Choose from a selection of air hoses, fittings and other pneumatic accessories from premium manufacturers such as Coilhose, Senco, RolAir and others. Our bet, you won't regret it.
    ~The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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  • Father's Day Project: Build A Frame For Your Wall-Mount TV

    Looking for a project to do with dad this Father's Day? You've seen the gift guide, know the date (June 21st - just in case it slipped your mind), but why not take it a step further and spruce up pop's "man cave" with an easy woodworking project that's perfect for dad, son, and even grandpa to do together? That's right, if you couldn't guess from the title of this post, we're talking about crafting a frame for dad's wall-mounted flatscreen TV. Learn what it takes to make this project count, the tools you'll need, and more - right here on the Nail Gun Network.
    Let's start with the basics. You'll need an 18 gauge brad nailer and brad nails, a 23 gauge pin nailer and micro pins, some wood glue, a tape measure and a miter saw - oh, and of course, the wood for your frame and molding. Once the frame is complete, you'll probably also want to stain or paint it, and add felt strips to the inside of the box to prevent scratching the TV once it's inside. Mounting elastic bands (or something similar) to the back of the frame will help to keep the box level and prevent any slipping.
    Grex Pin Nailer
    To start the project, you'll need to measure the dimensions of the television itself. Don't forget to measure depth too, to determine how thick the frame needs to be. Dimensions should be about 1/8" larger than the television itself. Once you've cut the box, you'll use wood glue and brad nails to secure the frame.
    At this point, you have two options, you can simply stain or paint the frame, add the felt lining and elastic bands on the back to prevent slippage, and insert around the TV - or you can cut decorative trim to dress up the box frame and give it additional visual appeal.
    TV
    If you opt for decorative molding, leaving the 1/8" overlap where molding meets the frame, add twice that amount to the dimensions of molding that you cut. Make your miter cuts to the flat side of your molding - this will be integral to achieving a picture frame look for the final appearance. Use a pin nailer and micro pin nails to fasten your molding to the frame. You can also use some additional wood glue to help seal the molding where it meets at the corners of your frame.
    All that's left is to mount the television and enjoy.
    PROJECT NOTE: Remember that the TV needs to still be mounted to it's manufacturer specified mount. The decorative frame is NOT a substitute mount for the television.
    Freeman P7TRKTM
    If you're looking for a great start to this project, the Freeman Tools P7TRKTM 3-Tool Combo Kit includes most of the items required to handle this project. With a brad nailer, pin nailer and tape measure included, give dad a new set of tools to go with his brand new flatscreen TV frame.
    Wishing An Early Happy Father's Day To All,
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
    To leave the 1/8-in. reveal where the molding overlaps the frame, so weÔÇÖre adding twice that amountÔÇöor 1/4 inchÔÇöto the dimensions we cut. These miter cuts are made on the flat side of the molding so the pieces create the picture-frame look when they all go together. The frame can be fastened to the box with finish nails. - See more at: http://extremehowto.com/flat-tv-screen-frame/?page=all#sthash.LGvTXQeY.dpuf
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  • What's The Difference Between An Impact Driver & Power Drill?

    With Father's Day coming up, a new power drill always ranks high for Father's Day gift giving. When you're shopping for dad's new drill, you'll probably come across impact drivers too. But which is the better tool for dad? Discover the difference between an impact driver and a power drill, their uses, and which tool is ultimately the best investment.
    To the amateur eye, an impact driver and a power drill look almost identical. However, while they may look alike, they serve two different purposes. Cutting to the chase, an impact driver will be most useful for someone who frequently has the need to drive large screws into dense wood. You will find that impact drivers come in handy for deck building and repair, installing plywood subfloor, tile backerboard, cabinet installation and similar applications. Contractors typically choose the impact driver as it provides more torque (turning force), generally to the tune of two or three times that of a power drill. Impact drivers combine increased torque with concussive blows (driving screws with high impact intervals), to deliver the force required to drive large fasteners into the densest wood(s).
    Hitachi Impact Driver
    Power drills, on the other hand, don't provide nearly as much brute power as their impact driver cousin. Whereas an impact driver sinks large screws with ease, power drills are not capable of sinking large screws - period - and require a substantial amount of additional force from the user to drive smaller screws evenly. That amounts to more energy required from the user's wrist, which can lead to discomfort during long-term use. Power drills utilize a keyless chuck, meaning they can take a wide-range of round or hex shaped bits. Impact drivers can only take hex shaped driver bits due to their design. Another key distinction, power drills feature a slip clutch that allows a user to select the precise amount of torque they need for an application. If you are looking for something versatile to drill holes and drive smaller screws, you might find a power drill to be your best bet.
    Hitachi Power Drill
    To sum things up, power drills provide decent torque for lightweight fasteners and drilling, but impact drivers will provide the most power for fastening larger screws into dense wood. Power drills are more versatile in the respect that they will take almost any bit type, whereas an impact driver requires hex bits only. Power drills also commonly feature a clutch - impact drivers typically do not, though this trend is gradually changing. Impact drivers will make a bit more noise than their power drill counterpart, but they make up for the noise factor with a compact design for easy transport and storage.
    All in all, the best tool for dad really depends on the type of project he likes to do. If dad is into heavy-duty fastening, the impact driver is probably your best bet. If he likes to tinker around the house with light to medium-duty projects, consider the power drill. Most avid woodworkers will want to keep both tools on hand, so at the end of the day, you really can't go wrong with either of the two.
    Hitachi Hammer Drill
    One last tip to consider, keep in mind the difference between a power drill and a hammer drill too. Hammer drills are designed to provide additional torque from the rear, to drill or drive screws into concrete and other hard materials.
    Your Impact Driving Experts,
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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  • Troubleshooting Roof Damage Caused By Winter Weather

    We've survived another winter. As temperatures continue to rise and spring flowers blossom, some will find that winter has left one final reminder of its presence - roof damage. Find out what you need to look for once the snow has melted, to catch minor issues before they turn into major repairs. Discover how to locate and repair roof problems triggered by winter weather, when you enter the Nail Gun Network.
    Gutter Ice
    While weather in general will gradually take its toll on a roof over time, it's been found that roof problems frequently stem specifically from winter weather. The convergence of warm and cold, ice, and snow increases the amount of wear and tear on a roof. Take a look at these causes for winter roof damage.
    • Ice Dams: As melted snow refreezes and turns to ice, it typically builds up wherever there is an angle or corner in the roof - where the water has room to pool. If gutters are clogged or do not have adequate drainage, this can compound the problem. Ice dams create several potential problems. From a safety standpoint, they present potential danger to anyone that is standing below them, in the event they separate from the roof and fall. From a structural standpoint, ice dams create a significant amount of extra weight collecting at the same spot. Over the course of winter, this can loosen shingles and cause damage to gutters or woodwork that is directly exposed to this weathering agent. The additional weight can also cause structural stress - leading to leaks and possible structural damage.
    • Snow Accumulation: Small amounts of snow can actually insulate from the cold, but large accumulation (especially wet, heavy snow) creates extra weight that puts additional pressure on the roof frame and structure. Heavy snow can lead to cave-ins, collapses and other framing issues. There isn't much that can be done to prevent the amount of snow on your roof, but you can make sure your gutters and drains are flowing properly in the fall, to make sure that as snow melts it can flow away from the roof. Properly ventilating the area directly below your roof - typically an attic or crawlspace - will help to distribute heat equally, allowing snow that has accumulated on a roof to melt evenly and prevent refreezing or uneven snow melt.
    Stinger Cap Stapler
    Once the snow has melted, here's what you need to look for to see just how well your roof held up throughout the winter.
    • Loose Shingles: These are relatively easy to detect. Generally, you'll see any separation from the roof board. If the shingle has become completely separated from the roof structure, it will need to be patched or replaced with a new shingle.
    • Wood Rot: This is harder to detect. Unless a shingle has been completely removed, you probably won't see much rot. The shingle is designed to protect the wood sub-surface, so long as moisture is not able to build up underneath the shingle. In the event of ice damming, you might see damage to trimwork in the corners where ice accumulated.
    • Gutter Flow: If you noticed your gutters overflowed frequently during the winter, it might mean that the flow is being blocked by debris. It could also mean that your gutters are not large enough to handle the flow of water from your roof. It's extremely important to draw the water away from your home.
    • Leaking: Though this might seem like the easiest way to detect trouble, small leaks can often go unnoticed until they become big problems. Obviously, large damp spots on your ceiling will indicate water is coming inside. For smaller leaks, look for bubbling or discoloration in the ceiling. You can also check your attic or crawlspace to look for moisture entry.
    Senco Roofing Nailer
    If you determine your roof is in need of repair, Nail Gun Depot offers a variety of roofing nailers, cap staplers, hammer tackers and other fastening tools for roofing applications. As always, leave it to the professionals unless you have experience working with roofing. Always make safety your top priority.
    Nail Gun Depot will also be celebrating Roofing Month throughout May 2015. Take advantage of special discounts, free bonus items, and special roofing content on the Nail Gun Network.
    Your Source For Roofing Repair,
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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