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How-To Instructions
How-To Instructions
  • How To Avoid Destroying Your Pneumatic Nailer

    Basic maintenance on a pneumatic nailer can slash unnecessary repair costs, and will keep your air-powered nail gun running like new. But, despite minimal effort required for preventative maintenance, we continue to see far too many pneumatic tools reduced to scrap from lack of service. We've previously covered how to protect your pneumatic tools and compressor from cold temperatures - but what about year-round maintenance? Take a look at these professional maintenance tips to extend the life of most pneumatic tools, protecting your investment.
    FramePro325XPAction1
    Depending on the region, a big risk to any pneumatic tool is simply the environment it inhabits. Airborne particles can clog pneumatic nailers and cause undue wear to components within the tool. This is particularly true in coastal regions, where moisture and salt in the air increases the chance for system failure, rusting or corrosion. In areas with high moisture content in the air, it's extra important to avoid prolonged exposure to the elements. Invest in a systainer case or air-tight box to store pneumatic tools that are not in use. The same principle applies to areas that have a lot of dust or sand in the air - particularly when talking about prolonged exposure at a job site.
    Hitachi NV45AB2 Coil Roofing Nailer
    A universal rule for protecting and prolonging the life of a pneumatic nailer, make sure the tool is properly lubricated at all times. A regular cause for air nailer failure is component wear due to lack of lubrication. Just like you wouldn't drive a car without oil in the engine, a pneumatic tool requires the same attention. It's also crucial to note that pneumatic nailers and staplers require special lubricant, specifically labeled as pneumatic tool oil. Many generic lubricants eat through rubber over time, which will cause more harm than help in the long run (remember most pneumatic nail guns have rubber o-rings). NEVER use WD40, motor oil, transmission fluid or aerosol lubricants.
    Unless specified otherwise by the manufacturer, make sure pneumatic nailers, staplers and other fastening tools receive regular lubrication to moving parts. Even with a self-oiling valve design, it's important to keep watch that your pneumatic nailer is receiving the proper amount of lubrication. In general, we recommend putting two or three drops of pneumatic tool oil directly into the coupling joint, before connecting the air hose. Do so daily at the start and finish of use - and be sure to fire the tool two to three times to give the oil a chance to work through the valves.
    Surprisingly enough, many other causes for system failure on a pneumatic nailer can be prevented by simply using the tool properly. Before firing the nail gun, make sure you are using the correct size and type of nail. Pay careful attention to the nail's angle, as well as the collation.
    You'll also want to check the manufacturer's recommended operating pressure, before hooking up an air compressor, to avoid misfiring caused by inadequate air flow. Too much air pressure can drive nails too deep - whereas too little pressure can cause nails to not sink evenly. Furthermore, consistently using improper air pressure can damage the pneumatic tool over time.
    Make sure you are using the proper size air compressor too. For finish and trim work, small hand-carry compressors will typically perform adequately. For framing tools, or if you are planning to connect multiple air-powered nailers, larger wheelbarrow compressors could be a better fit.
    rolair compressor at jobsite
    As always, safety should be top priority. Always consult your owner's manual, or visit the manufacturer's website for detailed information about your pneumatic tool. For more maintenance advice, consult a certified repair center.
    Keeping Your Pneumatic Nailer On The Job,
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
    Read More
  • Nail Gun Depot Is Celebrating Its 15th Anniversary

    It's hard to believe, but did you realize Nail Gun Depot has been around for 15 years? Launched in 2000, the site has played its part in the explosion of the Internet and e-commerce - surviving several events that have shaped the world we live in today. The NGD site we have come to know has lived through several refreshes and reconfigurations, the addition of new tools and technology, and the demise of outdated products. With annual visitors in the millions, Nail Gun Depot offers one of the largest, most comprehensive collections of fastening products available. From nailers to staplers, screw guns and fasteners, we've got something for every application. Don't take our word, see it for yourself!
    Nail Gun Depot 15th Anniversary
    Did you know Nail Gun Depot isn't just an e-commerce site, it's an information database? Choose from several resources to help pair the correct tool or fastener with your application. For example, the Fastener Finder feature on Nail Gun Depot let's you choose your tool - searching the site and matching your query with the appropriate fasteners. Need a bit more? Visit the Nail Gun Network blog and content database for how to projects, tool news, maintenance tips, and virtually everything else you need to know about power fastening tools.
    Nail Gun Network Logo
    But wait, there's more! Without loyal customers, Nail Gun Depot would be nothing. We want to take a second (or year) to thank all of our customers and visitors, whether you have purchased from us once - or visit the site weekly - thank you for your continued support. To remain one of the best in customer service, we are excited to announce a refreshed, mobile-friendly Nail Gun Depot is on its way. Look for the new Nail Gun Depot to launch later in 2015. Other initiatives on the way include a 15th Anniversary Giveaway - featuring Nail Gun Depot's "Bleed Orange Bundle" - as well as several other smaller giveaways and promotions throughout 2015 to thank our customers for 15 years in business. Look for a more extensive, larger Nail Gun Network too!
    Nail Gun Depot Brands
    It's customers like you that keep Nail Gun Depot alive and growing - so thank you again from the entire staff at Nail Gun Depot.
    Here's To Nailing Another 15 Years,
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
    Read More
  • DIY Tips: How To Install Flawless Drywall

    In honor of Nail Gun Depot's Screw Gun Showdown, let's take a look at one of the top uses for a screw fastening system, installing drywall. An important step in any major home renovation or remodeling project, knowing how to install drywall can save time and money. Learn how to install drywall, the best tools for the job, and other useful DIY tips - here on the Nail Gun Network.
    Quik Drive Drywall Attachment
    Most new construction projects mandate the use of drywall screws when installing drywall. Screws are certainly ideal, as their thread provides better holding power - especially in climates where wood is prone to expand and contract regularly. In some circumstances, drywall nails can be used to hang wallboard, but beware, over time nail popping and other imperfections to the wall might occur as the wood frame expands and contracts. For long-term quality, we recommend using collated drywall screws and a screw gun - for fast, easy, cost-effective drywall installation. Senco DuraSpin and Simpson Quik Drive are two competitive screw fastening systems that continue to offer best-in-class performance.
    Project Note: Most Drywall Screws Require A Phillips Drive.
    Another benefit to using screws over nails for drywall installation, it generally takes less screws to complete the project. Be certain to consult your local building code before beginning installation of drywall, as different regions have different requirements. Beyond building code, don't fall victim to silly, yet expensive errors.
    Senco DuraSpin Drywall Installation
    Even for beginners, drywall installation is relatively easy to pick up. Just pay careful attention to the following:
    • Prior to installation, make sure the lumber you are fastening drywall board to is within an acceptable range of moisture content, less than 19 percent by most standards. As damp wood dries out, it can lead to popping of fasteners - and splitting at seams.
    • Don't overlook sagging panels - particularly when installing a ceiling. Make sure to drive extra screws into place while pressing firmly on the loose board. In some extreme cases, an additional brace or bracket may be required to guarantee a firm fit. Likewise, watch for bulging at your vertical seams. If the drywall board swells at the seam - once it has been taped and sealed - it may require sanding. You can prevent this issue by ensuring there is no gap between drywall boards during installation.
    • Don't take the easy route when it comes to corners. Use a corner guard versus drywall tape and spackle. A corner guard will hold up better in the long run and is typically easier to work with than tape. You should also mark your studs and joists prior to installation of a drywall board. This will help improve the accuracy of your drive and will prevent additional repair work in problem areas.
    • Watch for imperfections in drywall tape. Don't ignore bubbles, streaks, splits or other noticeable imperfections in drywall tape as it is laid. If air is allowed between the tape and base, it will lead to separation later on. Tape that is not secured properly can eventually peel and will require repair and repainting. In areas where warm and cold air are allowed to converge regularly, eventual loosening and separation of tape from the drywall base is almost inevitable.
    • Make sure your screw gun is set to the proper depth. Depending on the thickness of the board, determine the appropriate screw length and depth adjustment for your tool. Driving too deep can cause noticeable divets in the drywall. Driving too short leaves the screw's head protruding. If installed properly, the screw's head should sit slightly below the drywall surface - leaving just enough room for compound to smooth the surface.
    Drywall Board
    To recap, make sure your framing is dry, mark your studs and joists for accurate drive locations, hold the drywall board firmly against the wood frame while fastening in place, line up boards for accuracy, scan and repair imperfections, and enjoy.
    Here's To Flawless DIY Drywall,
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
    Read More
  • How To Choose Stainless Steel Fasteners

    Growing in popularity and demand, stainless steel nails, staples and screws are quickly becoming the fastener of choice for premium-quality construction projects. While these fasteners are costlier than those made of other materials - they provide the best protection against rust and other deterioration causing agents. Find out how to select the right grade of stainless steel for your project - here on the Nail Gun Network.
    Stainless Steel Deck Screw
    Before we start, let's take a brief look at stainless steel itself. Stainless steel is composed of high amounts of chromium, the element that provides corrosion resistance and additional strength to stainless. It is chromium that gives the steel its rough, adherent, corrosion resistant surface. Its self-healing properties (if oxygen is present) provide further enhancement. A popular metal for its appearance, stainless steel is now becoming an integral component in quality-construction projects - particularly in coastal regions.
    There are several different grades of stainless steel fastener, however, most contractors will be most familiar with three main classes: 302, 304 and 316. The lower grade option, 302 stainless steel has a greater carbon count, reducing its corrosion resistance. A less expensive form of stainless steel, 302 is softer and more likely to strip. This type of stainless is best used in projects where corrosive agents are less prominent - such as interior projects.
    Stainless Steel Fasteners
    The next major classification, 304 stainless steel is the most widely recognized stainless product available. Known for its balance of nickel and chromium, 304 grade stainless steel is more durable and offers better corrosion resistance than 302 grade. Less expensive than its 316 grade cousin, 304 stainless steel fasteners typically offer the best balance of corrosion resistance, versatility and cost. This grade of stainless steel typically provides an adequate amount of strength and protection in most instances.
    304 Stainless Steel
    An even stronger form of stainless steel, 316 grade stainless is the preferred grade for projects where exposure to high chloride salt is prevalent. Popular in coastal regions, 316 stainless is resistant to chloride corrosion - and is recommended for all seaside applications. The downside to 316 grade stainless, it is costlier than its lower-grade counterparts.
    316 Stainless Steel
    In addition to these three grades, look for 18-8 as a generic grade for stainless steel. The grade of 18-8 can refer to grades ranging from 302-305. Generally, you will not want to go below the rating of 18-8 in terms of stainless steel fasteners.
    Make sure to select the appropriate grade of stainless steel for your project. Depending on the environment of your application, choosing the right grade of stainless steel can determine the long-term quality of your project. To find the appropriate stainless steel fasteners for your tool on Nail Gun Depot, simply search the applicable category of fasteners and choose from items labeled as stainless. Be sure to check back often, as we continue to expand our stainless steel nail, staple and screw product lines.
    Your Guide To Stainless Steel Fasteners,
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
    Read More
  • Maintaining Pneumatic Tools & Compressors For Cold Weather

    If you live in a region susceptible to winter weather, as most North Americans do, it's crucial that your pneumatic tools and air compressors are properly maintained for the cold. If at all possible, it's best to avoid using pneumatic tools in temperatures below freezing - however, for contractors that depend on their tools for a living, there are measures that can be taken to help protect the integrity and performance of your tools or compressor from the freezing cold. Find out more - right here on the Nail Gun Network.
     
    Cold Weather Tool & Compressor Maintenance
    Let's start with cold weather maintenance tips for an air compressor. As an air compressor runs, moisture builds up in the tank from compression taking place. While it is good practice to make sure the tank is drained after every use (particularly in damp, humid climates), it is especially important in cold or freezing temperatures, as this water moisture can freeze and seize up the entire unit. To drain your compressor, simply release the drain valve, which is typically located on or near the bottom of the tank. Make sure you do this while the tank is under some pressure - then, take care to close the valve or valves until the air stops leaking. NOTE: never twist the valves with pliers.
     
    Other cold weather tips for your compressor, consider using heat lamps to keep the compressor regulator from freezing. You can also put your compressor on a continuous run cycle, if available on the model you own. Need help picking out a compressor? You can visit Nail Gun's Introduction To Air Compressors.
     
    Now that your compressor is running, let's take a look at cold weather maintenance for pneumatic tools. First and foremost, make sure you are lubricating your tool with cold weather tool oil, such as Senco's PC1295 Moisture Shield cold weather air tool oil. Using a cold weather lubricant such as this one, is great preventative maintenance that is easy and inexpensive. You can apply a manufacturer approved cold weather tool oil to the tool itself - and the air line.
     
    Senco PC1295 Cold Weather Pneumatic Tool Oil
    Other cold weather tips for your pneumatic tool, when starting use in freezing temperatures, as the compressor builds up, WITHOUT fasteners in the tool, hook up your pneumatic nailer or stapler to the compressor and fire @ 40 PSI to help warm up the tool before use. NOTE: Make sure the tool has no fasteners in its magazine before/during firing to avoid damaging the tool or work surface and prevent injury.
     
    You can also rotate pneumatic tools - while keeping the idle tools warm. Using pipe insulation that fits over a coupler is another method that helps create a barrier between the tool and cold air. Can't decide which pneumatic tool is right for your application, check out Nail Gun's Construction Tool Index.
     
    Cold Weather Construction
    We can't guarantee all of these tips will work for everyone, but if used appropriately, they might save you some major repair expense and downtime on the job. Tools and compressors that are not maintained or used as the manufacturer specifies are susceptible to damage and destruction - so save yourself time, money, and a major headache, and prepare your equipment for responsible use.
     
    Your Tool Tip Experts,
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
    Read More
  • How To Build & Upholster Your Own Salvage Pallet Ottoman

    To make sure you get the latest and greatest tips and techniques of the industry, the Nail Gun Network occasionally hosts a guest blogger or expert contributor. Today, we are excited to let Shelly Miller Leer of ModHomeEc and the Upholstery Club take control of the Nail Gun Network, with her special project post, "Salvaged Pallet Ottoman." Pay careful attention to how she uses her brand-new BeA 71/16-436LN, 22 gauge long nose upholstery stapler.
    Whether you're sick of your old beat up coffee table, or you just need more pizazz in your space, creating an upholstered ottoman from a salvaged pallet is an easy weekend project. It's a little bit carpentry and a little bit upholstery. The biggest benefit of creating your own upholstered coffee table (or dog lounger) is that it's custom - you choose the fabric and the details. My inspiration came from a photo. It can be as simple as that.

     

    Materials:
    • A chemical free pallet
    • 1" x 4" pieces of pine or other wood to frame the bottom of the pallet
    • 1- 1/2" long wood screws
    • 2 yards of scrap fabric (burlap) to cover all but the bottom of the pallet
    • A piece of 2" foam (two pieces can be glued together to create a large enough piece)
    • Batting
    • 2+ yards of fabulous fabric
    • Spray adhesive for foam
    • Furniture legs and hardware
    • A black marker

     

    Tools:

    • Drill and drill bits
    • Scissors
    • Electric knife (to cut foam)
    • Glue gun (optional)
    Let's quickly talk about pallets. Not all pallets are suitable for an upholstered ottoman. Choose one that looks new, is sturdy, and requires the least amount of retrofitting. Pallets are rough and uneven. That's part of the charm and it's a good conversation point when bragging about your custom created ottoman.

    1. Measure and cut your wood pieces to fit the uneven bottom edge of the pallet

    2. Drill holes and secure the wood planks with screws so that they don't interfere with the placement of the corner leg plates

    3. Measure and drill holes for leg hardware. You may want the leg hardware to be attached so that you know how far the fabric can come under the frame.

    4. Flip frame over and wrap up the top and all sides like you're wrapping a present using burlap or scrap fabric

    *** The standard upholsterer's method to cover a square or rectangular frame is to secure the fabric with staples in the center of one side, move to the opposite side, then the two adjacent sides. You always start in the center and move out towards the corners, pulling and smoothing diagonally towards the corners, but leaving approximately 5-6" open at the corners for folding and fine tuning. This works for dining chair seats and all angular pieces.

    5. Place covered frame on top of 2" foam, making sure there's at least 1/2" over hang on all sides. Trace around frame with a big black marker.

     

    6. Keeping electric knife blade perpendicular to the foam, cut foam as traced

     

    7. Use spray adhesive to secure the foam to the burlap base

     

    8. Measure and cut batting to fit over the foam and wood frame

     

     

    9. This is important - DO NOT roll the batting UNDER the bottom of the frame. Secure it on the bottom of each side. You don't want a lumpy bottom edge.
     

    10. Corners are crucial to make this ottoman look professional. Make neat, tidy, hospital corners that are smooth, unpuckered and clean. This is the same technique as you'll use with your top fabric. Make it look professional!

    11. Trim off excess batting.

     

    12. Cut your fabric so that you'll have at least 3" of excess fabric on each side. This is known as "pull" - and you'll need it.

     

    13. Place fabric on top. Align any pattern, make sure everything is straight and start with the center of one side. Pull fabric under and attach just like you did the batting, only pull the fabric under the frame bottom. It's front to back, side to side, and move out towards the corners.

     

    *** The technique of pulling and smoothing at a diagonal and out towards the corners is what shows you know what you're doing. You want a smooth, even, slightly rounded top edge.

    14. Now make those corners look good by making that square corner as in the picture. Your hands are your best tool and sometime you'll need to get the frame on the floor and really be able to control the fabric.

    15. When the corner is just right, secure it with your stapler on the bottom of the frame.

    16. Trim off excess fabric, close around leg plates, attach legs.

     

    17. (Optional) Create and insert a time capsule and cover the bottom of the ottoman with a piece of scrap fabric as a dust cover by folding the edges under 1/2" and stapling in place every 3" around the bottom, folding back at the legs.

     
    Now that you have the insight, prepare your tools and get started on your own pallet ottoman. The Nail Gun Network would like to send a special thanks to Shelly Leer, who developed and wrote this guest post. If you are interested in learning more about upholstering techniques and project ideas, check her out or take one of her classes on ModHomeEc or the Upholstery Club.
    Here's To Starting Your Own Project,
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
    Read More
  • How To Select The Right Finish Nailer For Your Project

    Shopping for a new finish nailer can be a daunting task if you haven't done your homework first. While many models look and feel very similar, there are certain features that set one finish nailer apart from the other. Depending on your needs, this can play a major role in making an informed decision - leading to a purchase. Let's take a look at the differences between certain types of finishing nail guns.
    Bostitch Smart Point
    Let's start with 15 gauge finish nailers. These tools are ideal for projects such as cabinet and furniture building, picture frame assembly, trim and molding installation, and upholstery trim applications. Look for an angled nail magazine on most 15 gauge finish nailers. While there aren't many cordless 15 gauge models available, the Senco F-15 Fusion fills the void - quite well - eliminating the need for an air compressor with its 18V Lithium Ion Battery. Furthermore, the Senco Fusion (available in 15 gauge, 16 gauge - straight and angled, and 18 gauge variations) recently took top honors in a comparison test conducted by Popular Mechanics Magazine.
    Senco Fusion
    Similarly, 16 gauge finish nailers are ideal for many of the same applications as their 15 gauge counterpart. This includes projects such as installing door and window trim, baseboards, paneling, crown modeling, door jambs and more. The biggest difference between the two tools, 16 gauge finish nailers are generally smaller and lighter. Because 16 gauge nails have a slightly smaller diameter, many believe that the 15 gauge nail provides more holding power - depending on the type project you are looking to complete. You can find a wide variety of both angled and straight magazine 16 gauge finish nailers. Another cordless tool that ranks highly with contractors, the Paslode IM250A-Li drives 16 gauge angled finish nails and comes with a five-year warranty from Paslode.
    Paslode IM250A-Li
    Arguably, the most popular among finish nailer buyers who are purchasing a tool for DIY or occasional-use, 18 gauge brad nailers are built to handle trim, paneling, furniture repair and so much more. Brad nailers act as the catch-all tool for finish and trim applications. Keep in mind, brad nailers that can handle a 2" or larger fastener lend the most versatility. One of our favorites, Bostitch recently launched its Smart Point line of finsh and brad nailers. These tools are pneumatic, which means you'll need an air compressor, but offer some of the most precise nail placement available. The advantage to Smart Point, a narrow nose allows the user to access hard to reach areas with ease - while also reducing surface damage caused during firing. Similar to the Fusion family, Bostitch offers a Smart Point nailer in 15 gauge (DA and FN), 16 gauge, and 18 gauge variations.
    Bostitch Smart Point Nose
    Last in the finish fastening family, pin nailers offer the least holding power, but are perfect for projects that require a small nail, such as those used in birdhouse building, small trim, picture frame work, and light wood assembly. Commonly available in either a 21 gauge or 23 gauge variation - 23 gauge being most popular - pin nailers are ideal for any application that requires a narrow fastener. Pin nails are also available in both headless and headed variations, just be sure that the tool you are using is compatible with the fastener you are intending to use. When it comes to pin nailers, Grex maintains a commanding share of the market - offering six different models of 23 gauge pin nailer. Affordable and reliable, Grex pin nailers are a safe choice for any first-time buyer.
    Grex 23 Gauge Pin Nailers
    Now that you know the difference between finish, brad and pin nailers - which one best suits you?
    Your Finish Nailer Experts,
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
    Read More
  • How To Build & Install Your Own Kitchen Cabinets

    Chilly temperatures and shorter periods of daylight mean one thing - winter is near. With Halloween less than a week away, it's time to start thinking about the indoor projects you've been putting off all summer. If you're looking to renovate your kitchen, consider building and/or installing your own kitchen cabinets - a project that can save thousands of dollars if done correctly.
    OMER Cabinet Trim
    Before you start, make sure you are up for the challenge. If you've never tackled a project like this before, you might want to purchase pre-built cabinets and jump straight to installation. If you decide to start from scratch, keep in mind this project will take a good amount of time and dedication to complete - especially for larger kitchens. However, for the master woodworker, the end result could be well worth the time - just make sure you have a helper or two for lifting and mounting.
    Building Your Cabinets
    If you are starting from scratch, make sure you have the proper materials. Traditionally, cabinets are about 24" deep and 34.5" tall - with a 25" deep counter top - which adds up to an overall height of 3 feet. To calculate the placement for upper cabinets, add 18" to 20" to the counter height. Subtract the difference from your overall ceiling height to determine the size range available for your upper cabinets. Keep in mind, regular wall cabinet depth is 12" to 14". Lower cabinet width can range from 12" to 60" - divided down in 3" increments. Make sure you also account for door size when planning the size of your cabinets.
    Next, you will need to cut your materials for assembly. For the sides, appearance really doesn't matter (unless it's an edge cabinet) - as long as your material is sturdy enough to support the cabinet, counter and all of the contents inside your cabinet. You might find that 3/4" plywood or manufactured board works well. Once the sides have been cut to proper dimensions, clamp your two sides together and use a saw to cut out a toe-kick (notch) where the base of your floor cabinets will be. For upper cabinets, you will not need a toe-kick. To finish up prepping material, cut the bottom panel, the face panels, as well as two base panels and two top braces - base panels and top braces not needed for wall cabinets.
    Moving to assembly, you will want to put together the base first. Make sure you have a high-quality wood glue and power drill or screw gun available for this step, as you will attach your base panels to the bottom panel. Make sure to allow the proper amount of space for your toe-kick before gluing together. Drive screws into the base panels to confirm a secure fit. Add your side panels, secure the top braces, and nail the back on using a finish nailer. Use braces or corner brackets to secure the unit and reinforce its integrity. Install shelves and face panels before attaching your cabinets to the wall.
    Depending on the thickness of board you are working with, Bostitch is now offering its all-new Smart Point line of finish nailers. Smart Point finish nailers feature a unique nose that increases the capability of these tools - while decreasing the amount of damage caused to a surface during firing.
    Bostitch Smart Point
    Installing Your Cabinets
    For time conscious DIYer's and renovators that skipped the previous steps and purchased pre-built cabinets from the store, it's now time to install your new kitchen cabinets. Installation is relatively easy - especially for floor cabinets. Simply fit your cabinets where they are intended to be installed, and drive screws through the back panel into studs in the wall. For wall cabinets - where additional support is imperative - you will also need to secure "L" brackets into studs in the wall, to help support these hanging cabinets at their base.
    To drive screws quickly and effectively, we recommend a Senco DuraSpin Screw Gun. With several different fasteners to choose from, the new Senco DuraSpin comes highly recommended by many of the Pro's.
    Senco DuraSpin
    Fit your door panels and fasten - assuming they haven't been installed yet. Depending on the type of kitchen cabinet you are building or installing, you will also have to install your counter, sink, decorative trim or any additional accessories not mentioned.
    Be sure to pay careful attention to manufacturer specs on any material or pre-manufactured goods. Always follow manufacturer assembly, installation and safety requirements. Keep in mind that this is an overview of tips and tricks for kitchen cabinet assembly and installation. Every kitchen is different, and might require additional steps or measurements be taken.
    Here's To Nailing Your Next Cabinet Installation,
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
    Read More
  • How To Get The Most From Your Pneumatic Staple Gun

    Are you learning how to use a pneumatic stapler? Get the most out of your staple gun - find out how right here on the Nail Gun Network, by Nail Gun Depot.
    Let's start with loading the tool. Loading a staple gun can vary from tool to tool; however, the following provides general instruction for loading a typical pneumatic stapler.

    Before you start, it's crucial that you have the proper staples. The type of staple that your tool takes will vary from model to model, and manufacturer to manufacturer. Check your tool's specs or manual if you are confused about the type of staple it takes.You can also search for your tool's staples using the Fastener Finder on NGD.

    Once you have identified the correct staples, you need to load them. Most staple guns come in either a top or bottom loading variation. Medium and heavy wire pneumatic staplers generally load from the top, while most fine wire staplers load from the bottom.

    Before loading, be sure to disconnect the air supply and keep the stapler pointed away from you at all times - as you should for any firing tool.

    For a top loading stapler, pull the magazine follower back until it locks into position. After the follower is locked into position, place the strip of staples over the magazine rail. The staples should move freely, back and forth on the rail. The last step is to unlock the follower and release it - so that it pushes the staples into the nose of the staple gun for firing.

    If you have a bottom load stapler, locate the release first - which is generally found at the rear of magazine. Depress the release and slide the magazine rail away from the nose. Turn the stapler upside down and insert the staples into the channel, towards the nose of the stapler. Make sure the pointed ends of the staples are loaded - so they will fire into your application. After the staples have been loaded, slide the magazine rail back, towards the nose, until it locks into place. Now you are ready to connect your air supply and test fire.

    Staple guns are designed for a variety of applications, from upholstering furniture to decking and siding applications. With more than 200 available options on NGD, we're confident you can find the right stapler to get your project done right.

    Your Source For Staple Gun Knowledge,
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
    Read More
  • Tips & Tools To Build The Perfect Deck

    Summer is approaching quickly, which means its time to enjoy the longer evening hours with some much needed time outdoors. For many Americans, this means relaxing on their deck or patio. An important feature on new and old homes alike, a large, well-built deck can add major profit margins to your home's resale value. If you are considering the addition of a new deck to your home, or are replacing an existing one, learn about some of the tips and tools that will help you build the ultimate deck - here on Nail Gun Depot's blog.

    The actual process of building a deck can take weeks - or even months - depending on its size and the amount of resources you have to pour into it. Because it is such an intricate and drawn out process, we are just going to focus on the major milestones in the deck building process. If this is your first woodworking or deck building project, we recommend you consult a professional to help you create the deck of your dreams. One or two missed steps can lead to expensive repairs and time lost.

    If you are building a new deck, you will have to start with its foundation - also known as its footing. Typically, footing(s) are poured concrete that you then attach post anchors and beams to, with a power drill. Meanwhile, you will also have to anchor and attach a ledger board to the wall of your house - or the supporting structure - to anchor the deck. You will then anchor the joists to the ledger board.

    Once you have installed joists to the beams and the frame is in place, you will then need to consider how you want to attach the flooring of your deck. There are a couple ways to go about flooring installation. You will want to use a deck screw, treated for outside use - Senco offers a full line-up of deck screws. If you choose to do a traditional deckfloor install, you should think about using a screw gun with an extension, such as the Senco DuraSpin DS425-AC (6W0012N). The benefit to using this screw gun for deck floors - or any sub-floor installation - is that it has an extendable arm, which eliminates the need to bend over or kneel down to drive screws. Quik Drive also offers decking attachments that are comparable in form and function to that of DuraSpin - and come with a lifetime warranty.

    If you don't like the appearance of deck screws, you can opt for a slightly different method of floorboard installation. The CAMO Marksman Pro, Hidden Deck Fastening System, drives CAMO deck screws in at an angle to create the appearance of a fastener free deck. Like the DS425-AC DuraSpin, the CAMO Marksman Pro will work with hardwood and composite decking applications. The Marksman Pro works with most power drills, by simply positioning the system over a board, loading your fasteners, and driving the deck screws in with the drill.

    In addition to the flooring installation, you will also need to build stairs - assuming the deck is going to connect with the ground below it - and install a railing that surrounds the deck. Depending on the type of wood you are using, if you are building a wood deck, check to see how long the wood needs to set before it is ready for stain.

     

    For more information on deck building tools and fasteners, contact a representative at Nail Gun Depot.

     

    Helping You Build The Deck Of Your Dreams,

    The Team At Nail Gun Depot

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