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  • Tips & Tools To Build The Perfect Deck

    Summer is approaching quickly, which means its time to enjoy the longer evening hours with some much needed time outdoors. For many Americans, this means relaxing on their deck or patio. An important feature on new and old homes alike, a large, well-built deck can add major profit margins to your home's resale value. If you are considering the addition of a new deck to your home, or are replacing an existing one, learn about some of the tips and tools that will help you build the ultimate deck - here on Nail Gun Depot's blog.

    The actual process of building a deck can take weeks - or even months - depending on its size and the amount of resources you have to pour into it. Because it is such an intricate and drawn out process, we are just going to focus on the major milestones in the deck building process. If this is your first woodworking or deck building project, we recommend you consult a professional to help you create the deck of your dreams. One or two missed steps can lead to expensive repairs and time lost.

    If you are building a new deck, you will have to start with its foundation - also known as its footing. Typically, footing(s) are poured concrete that you then attach post anchors and beams to, with a power drill. Meanwhile, you will also have to anchor and attach a ledger board to the wall of your house - or the supporting structure - to anchor the deck. You will then anchor the joists to the ledger board.

    Once you have installed joists to the beams and the frame is in place, you will then need to consider how you want to attach the flooring of your deck. There are a couple ways to go about flooring installation. You will want to use a deck screw, treated for outside use - Senco offers a full line-up of deck screws. If you choose to do a traditional deckfloor install, you should think about using a screw gun with an extension, such as the Senco DuraSpin DS425-AC (6W0012N). The benefit to using this screw gun for deck floors - or any sub-floor installation - is that it has an extendable arm, which eliminates the need to bend over or kneel down to drive screws. Quik Drive also offers decking attachments that are comparable in form and function to that of DuraSpin - and come with a lifetime warranty.

    If you don't like the appearance of deck screws, you can opt for a slightly different method of floorboard installation. The CAMO Marksman Pro, Hidden Deck Fastening System, drives CAMO deck screws in at an angle to create the appearance of a fastener free deck. Like the DS425-AC DuraSpin, the CAMO Marksman Pro will work with hardwood and composite decking applications. The Marksman Pro works with most power drills, by simply positioning the system over a board, loading your fasteners, and driving the deck screws in with the drill.

    In addition to the flooring installation, you will also need to build stairs - assuming the deck is going to connect with the ground below it - and install a railing that surrounds the deck. Depending on the type of wood you are using, if you are building a wood deck, check to see how long the wood needs to set before it is ready for stain.

     

    For more information on deck building tools and fasteners, contact a representative at Nail Gun Depot.

     

    Helping You Build The Deck Of Your Dreams,

    The Team At Nail Gun Depot

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  • Paslode's 50th Nailer, Senco's 21 Gauge Pinner & Other Tools

    While we've been busy talking about spring projects, some of our favorite brands have been updating their lineup of nailers, staplers and fastening tools. Part of Nail Gun Depot's commitment to serving the latest tools and technology to our customers, we are excited to announce the following new and updated products that are now available to NGD customers.

    If you've been working in the construction trade for some time, you have most likely used a Paslode tool at some point. For those who are true to the brand, you'll be excited to hear Paslode is commemorating their 50th Anniversary of service to the construction and building industry in a very special way. To celebrate, Paslode will now offer a Special Edition 50th Anniversary Framing Nailer. The Paslode 50th Anniversary Framing Nailer (511990) (replaced by Paslode F-350P PowerMaster Pro Framing Nailer - 515000) might look familiar, as it is a beefed up version of the F-350S Framing Nailer. You will notice it is sporting an all-new, Paslode orange color scheme - paired with a full one-year warranty from the manufacturer. The 50th Anniversary Framing Nailer joins the reliability and durability of the Paslode brand, paired with the manufacturer's unique brand characteristics.

    Another important manufacturer with a rich history in construction and renovation, Senco has just announced the release of its all-new Finish Pro 21LXP Pin Nailer (8M0001N). The 21 gauge Senco 21LXP is designed to fill the gap between 18 gauge brad nailers and 23 gauge pin nailers - capable of driving 5/8" to 2" 21 Gauge Headed Pins and 21 Gauge Headless Pins. The FinishPro 21LXP also features automatic magazine adjustment for different fastener lengths, reversible belt hook, rear exhaust with embedded muffler, comfort grip handle, ultra-narrow nose, on board storage for extra no-mar pad and jam clearing wrench, and last-nail-lockout to prevent dry firing. If you are interested in this pin nailer, you can pre-order it on Nail Gun Depot and be one of the first to own this all-new tool. This item will release to the public around May 2014.

    Last but not least, we are expanding our selection of hog ring tools and "C" ring fasteners. In addition to our selection of BeA hog ring pliers, we will be expanding our inventory to include a variety of Bostitch hog ring tools and fasteners. These handy tools can assist on a variety of projects, from attaching automotive upholstery to fastening wire fencing. Stay tuned to Nail Gun Depot as we continue to expand our lineup of hog ring pliers.

    Whether you're celebrating Paslode's 50th, or testing a new Senco nailer, count on NGD for new tools and fasteners.

    Keeping You Up To Date With Tool News,
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot

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  • How To Build A Raised Garden Bed

    Spring has officially sprung, which means it's time to get outside and pick up where you left off on those leftover outdoor projects from last year. One project to consider, learn how to build raised garden beds with the team at Nail Gun Depot.

    An increasing demand for sustainable living has led many people - both rural and urban - to grow their own food. The perfect place to manage and monitor the growth of your food source, especially in urban areas, consider building a raised garden bed to harvest mini-crops. Once built, these sustainable planters will continue to provide a renewable food supply - year after year.

    Building one or two of these large planters is easier than you might think - it only requires a few hours, a nailer or screw gun, fasteners, a power saw, and lumber. Once built, you will want to fill each "box" with a soil and compost mixture, creating a nutrient rich fertilizer that can boost and sustain the growth of your garden. The purpose of these beds is to raise the soil up, creating a built in drainage system and reducing the amount of space needed between plants - helping to crowd out weeds.

    To get started, dig a trench around the space you want to install your raised garden bed(s). The trench should outline the shape of the garden bed, typically designed in a rectangular formation. The size of a raised garden bed can vary, with small ones that are 3' by 6' - ranging to larger ones that can double in size. Typically, these beds should be 1' to 2' high, as it might be hard to produce enough "fill-dirt" if the bed is much deeper. While there is not a "correct" size, you want each garden bed to be small enough that you can reach the center when planting, watering and harvesting.

    Once a trench has been dug out, begin laying your lumber to create a frame that fits into the trench that was formed. Note that if you are using a pressure treated wood (or any lumber that has been exposed to chemicals), you will want to insert a layer of landscape fabric into the bed of the planter to protect against any chemical seepage. Be sure to also use only galvanized or stainless steel nails or screws, to reduce/eliminate rust corrosion.

    Build each wall of your raised garden bed separately, then attach them together at the end of the project. You will want to use either a framing nailer, such as the Hitachi NR83AA3 (replaced by Hitachi NR83AA4), or a collated screw gun, such as the Senco DuraSpin DS-312. Once the walls are in place, you will want to also install a ledge along the frame of the bed, to rest on and/or lay gardening tools.

    Now that your garden bed frame has been built, you can elect to install an irrigation system or greenhouse cover, depending on the budget for your project and the vegetation you are looking to grow. Build your raised garden bed to accommodate the crops you are intending to plant. Tropical plants will require a greenhouse-like environment (including heat in the winter), whereas tomatoes only require sunlight and water from late-spring to early-fall.

    PROJECT NOTE: If you plan to keep any plant alive during the winter, you will need to protect them from the outside elements of colder climate areas.

    After adding your fertilizer mixture and planting your crop, be sure to protect your garden from predators such as deer and other wildlife that will eat your plants. Install a tall wire or chain fence around the garden bed(s) to prevent deer and other wildlife from feeding on your veggies. If budget allows, build an open, small-framed structure around your beds to protect them from animals - without blocking sun and rain from reaching them. You might find a Hog Ring Tool beneficial for fastening the wire.

     

    All that's left to do is tend to your crops and enjoy the sustainable foods that you grew in your backyard.

     

    Here's To Getting Your Hands Dirty,

    The Team At Nail Gun Depot

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  • Tools And Projects That Are Worth The Investment

    Are you getting ready to start a new home improvement project, know the category of tool you need, but can't decide whether it's worth spending extra to get a top of the line model? We usually talk about tool categories for a project, but what about the features of a tool that makes it unique to the competition? Today, we're going to focus on a few of our favorite tools to splurge on, paired with the projects they are built to tackle. Learn which tools and projects are worth the investment.

    Let's start from the ground up, finding the right Framing Nailer to fasten the bones or frame of your project. One of the most popular choices according to Nail Gun Depot's customers, the Paslode CF325Li (902600) cordless framing nailer (replaced by Paslode CF325XP) is built to handle heavy duty work, with long term success. This framing nail gun drives 2" to 3-1/4" 30 degree paper tape strip nails without a cord or compressor. Powered by a fuel cell and rechargeable battery, reach the unreachable - this is the perfect framing tool for tight fitting spaces. Thinking about finishing a basement? This Paslode is the perfect tool to frame your walls. The CF325Li is a popular, contractor grade tool that gets a thumbs up from our customers.

    Once framing is complete, most contractors will use a screw gun to attach drywall to the wood studs. Available in both battery-powered and electrical-powered variations, the Senco DuraSpin Collated Screw System is among the most popular options available on the market today. Trusted by contractors for their quality and versatility, Senco's DuraSpin screw guns drive a range of collated screws from 5/8" to 3" in size. If you're in the market, look at the DS312-18V or DS332-AC to maximize the available range of screws accepted.

    PROJECT NOTE: If finishing a basement, stick to the basics. Less is more in many instances. Putting a lot of intricate detail and fancy upgrades into a basement does not typically return the investment. Unless budget is no object, look at tasteful updates that will boost resale value.

    Another popular upgrade, you might be looking to install new hardwood floors in your home. Hardwood flooring can add big value to a home and can help make it more attractive to a prospective buyer, if it is done correctly. Starting a hardwood installation properly means using tools to get the job done right - which is exactly why we recommend our next tool to splurge on. Known for making quality flooring tools, the Bostitch MIIIFS Hardwood Floor Stapler is one of the best-selling floor staplers offered at Nail Gun Depot. This flooring stapler has passed the test of time - and comes with a seven-year warranty to support its reputation. A quality pneumatic tool, the MIIIFS drives 15.5 gauge 1/2" crown flooring staples from 1-1/2" to 2" in length.

    PROJECT NOTE: Be sure to know the thickness of the floors you are installing. The typical range of thickness is 1/2" to 3/4" flooring, though other variations are available. Compare different breeds of wood to see which hardwood floor will match your walls and furniture best.

    Ready for small, around the house updates? For trim, molding, shelves, cabinets and more, you'll be looking for either a Finish or Brad Nailer. Once again, Senco is at the top of our must-have tool list with their Fusion line of Cordless Finish and Brad Nailers, which are among the most competitive options available to the market today. Models of the Fusion include the F-15, a 15 Gauge Angled Finish Nailer; the F-16A, a 16 Gauge Angled Finish Nailer; the F-16S, a 16 Gauge Straight Finish Nailer; and the F-18, an 18 Gauge Brad Nailer. These battery-powered finishing tools have been recognized by top-tier industry publications including Popular Mechanics and the Journal of Light Construction, thanks to their durability, versatility and available features.

    PROJECT NOTE: Adding crown molding to your home can infinitely improve appearance - and even boost resale value. This is an inexpensive upgrade that can payoff big when trying to sell your home. Look to match crown molding and baseboards for an aesthetically pleasing design. When working with a dining room or living space, consider adding a matching chair rail too.

    Last but not least, you have a fresh, new look for your home, but need some new furniture and decor to add that final, personal touch. When you've run out of ways to improve your house itself, look for ways to compliment its design - through decor. One way to do this is through refinishing and reupholstering furniture. For all of your upholstery work, make sure you choose a staple gun with the capability to take on a wide range of projects, which is why we recommend the Duo-Fast EIC-3118 (66118) 22 Gauge Electric Upholstery Stapler (replaced by Fasco-Maestri 7C-16 3/8" Crown Electric Stapler). This Duo-Fast upholstery stapler is electric powered, meaning there is no need for an air compressor. This tool will run 3/8" to 9/16" leg 22 gauge 3/8" crown fine wire staples, perfect for furniture upholstery and light wood assembly.

    PROJECT NOTE: Measure the length, width and depth of the seating pad and multiply three times the amount of any given dimension to calculate the amount of fabric you will need for your surface - this rule applies to a single surface, calculate for each chair separately. Measure from the longest point if working with a curved or angled shape.

    Ready to splurge on a quality, new tool? Contact Nail Gun Depot with any questions about these and other tools. Want to compare models? We can help with that too!

    Providing Tools That Get The Job Done Right,
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot

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  • The Difference Between Brad Nailers & Finish Nailers

    Are in the middle of a home improvement project, but caught on which fastening tool you need to complete it? If you are doing simple upgrades around the house, you are most likely shopping for either a finish or brad nail gun - but which one is right for you? To the untrained eye, these tools would appear to be the same, but in reality, each has a very different purpose.

    Let's start with what makes each of these power fastening tools unique. A brad nailer is designed to run 18 gauge, fine wire brad nails. These small nails are very hard to drive manually, which makes a brad nailer essential to any major home renovation project where brads are needed. On top of that, brad nails are almost invisible to the naked eye once they have been driven into wood. In fact, there is a good chance you will not need carpenter's putty to conceal a brad nail that has been driven into trim. The downside to using brad nails/nailer, these fasteners do not have the holding strength to be used for larger, heavier projects, such as large crown molding or baseboards.

    For larger, more bulky wood trim, you will need to use a finish nailer, such as the Paslode IM250A-Li Cordless Finish Nailer. Finish nail guns will run 15 or 16 gauge finish nails, which are slightly larger than a brad nail, giving them increased holding strength. The biggest downside to using a finishing nail gun, because of the larger diameter fastener, you will almost certainly need to cover nail openings with putty. Furthermore, if you try to use a finish nailer on a small piece of trim, there is an increased probability for wood splitting and the formation of imperfections on the wood.

    Ideally, you'll want to have both tools handy for projects, especially if you are regularly working with trim and molding. If you have to choose between buying one or the other, your best bet is to start with a brad nailer, as it can handle most light trim work and will require less touch-up after installation. If you are installing shelving or a mantle, you will probably want to go with the higher strength, finish nail. The downside to only using a finish nail gun, it has the potential to split thin wood and might require additional touch up on small trim and lighter duty projects. While a finish nailer can tackle many of the same projects as a brad nailer - and then some - the brad nailer will maintain best overall appearance on small trim work.

    Once you have determined whether a brad nailer or a finish nailer will best suit your needs, be sure to also consider whether a cordless, battery-powered nailer or a pneumatic, air-powered nailer will be the most efficient choice for your project. For the around-the-house DIY'er, you might find that the battery powered brad or finish nail gun is best, as it does not require an air compressor to run and can be used in hard to reach places. Senco's Fusion line of finish and brad nailers, the F-15 Finisher, F-16 Finisher and F-18 Brad Nailer, stand as excellent, industry-leading examples of cordless nail guns. For a contractor or individual that has a regular use for either tool, consider a pneumatic nailer, as they typically offer better long-term reliability than their battery-powered sibling - and do not require recharging. Brands such as Bostitch, Hitachi and Senco all offer high-quality, air-powered finish and brad nailers.

    Ready to nail your next project? Feel free to drop a line if you need more information, or would like to research a specific tool.

    Your Leading Source For Nail Gun Knowledge,
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot

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  • How To Install Hardwood Floors

    With the housing market slowly taking a positive turn, many consumers are beginning to once again buy and sell houses. At the same time, many house hunters are looking for homes they can rehab - giving them a chance to put their personal style into the home they will live. A popular trend in rehab and renovation, and one of the first things many home-buyers will add to their home if it's not already there, installing hardwood floors can enhance your home's appearance - and even add value. Learn how to install hardwood floors, on the blog by Nail Gun Depot.
     
    Your first step in hardwood floor installation is determining the type of wood you want to use, including species, board width and thickness. The finish and color of your hardwood flooring will play a major role in the overall appearance of a room, so make sure you choose flooring that matches your furniture, cabinets, counters and wall color. Know the measurements of the space you will be installing a new floor, to get the most accurate pricing and quantity of materials needed. Thicker wood is typically more expensive, but can add strength to your floor system. If you are working with a tight budget though, you will most likely want to use a thinner cut of wood.
     
     
    When measuring a room for flooring installation, measure the width and length, then multiply for square footage. Order 10-15% extra material to allow for mistakes and irregular board lengths - such as when lining floor boards up to a wall.
     
    Before you even begin to install your hardwood floor, inspect the sub-floor to make sure it is sturdy and free of squeaks. At a minimum, sub-flooring needs to be 3/4" thick. If there is a squeak, drive a long drywall screw into the sub-floor at the joist where the squeak happens. Be sure the sub-floor is clean and free of any debris.
     
     
    Next, you will want to put down a layer of vapor barrier paper. This paper helps to prevent moisture from forming underneath your hardwood, which can eventually lead to cupping or mold if left untreated. You'll want to use 15 pound tar paper or felt, allowing at least 4" of overlap between sheets. Secure the barrier by stapling - and be sure to pencil a line on the baseboards to show where joists are located. You are now ready to begin your installation.
     
    Start installation with the longest wall, and work your way across the room. Remove the shoe molding from the wall and create a chalk line 3/8" from the baseboard, to allow for expansion and contraction due to humidity and climate change. Begin with a long board for the first row. Line up the board's edge to the chalk line and drill pilot holes through the board into the sub-floor and joist. You will want to face nail each board at every joist, using a nail-set. Repeat this for the whole first row of boards - choosing board length at random to stagger the boards. A trick of the trade, lay all of your boards out prior to nailing, to get an idea of length and ensure the boards do not line up uniformly. Lay the floor boards perpendicular to the joists below. This will help to anchor the floor and will add to its sturdiness and integrity. A simple trick to help you determine direction, look at your sub-floor and see which direction the nails run along the joists.
     
     
    Once you have installed a few rows of boards, drill additional pilot holes into each board's tongue, and hand-nail the rolls. Once you have enough clearance, begin using a pneumatic floor nailer, such as the Bostitch Miiifn or the Senco SHF200. You can also use a manual floor nailer, such as the Bostitch MFN201, depending on preference. Keep in mind a pneumatic nailer will probably cost a little more than its manual counterpart, but the ease of use and time that a pneumatic tool saves will justify its use in most cases. You will also need to decide whether to use a flooring nailer versus a flooring stapler. Be sure to research the proper length of a nail or staple for the tool you are using - and the board it is fastening.
     
     
    Position the lip of your pneumatic floor nailer over a board's edge and strike firmly, using a flooring mallet. This will drive the nail into the tongue of the board. The industry standard, drive at least two nails per board - placing them roughly 10" apart. For tongue and groove flooring, make sure each end fits into the corresponding end of the next board. If this is not completed properly, your floor will be left with fairly large gaps. When you approach the opposite wall from where you began the flooring installation, you will again return to drilling pilot holes and using a nail-set, as the pneumatic nail gun will not fit properly.
     
    Once the last board is secured and in place, clean the newly installed hardwood flooring with a damp cloth, using only a water and/or vinegar solution. Finished hardwood is very durable, but can easily be damaged by exposure to dense moisture, direct sunlight, heavy items being dropped, or items scratching across its surface. If you take good care of your hardwood floors, they can last a lifetime.
     
    Good Luck On Your Next Flooring Project,
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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  • Specialty Fastening Tools You Need To Know About

    We talk a lot about the mainstream fastening tools that most of our customers can relate to their job site, but what about the specialty tools that go beyond a traditional finish nailer or flooring stapler? That's right, we're talking about the big-guns. These tools are not available at your big box stores. They are custom built - designed with the capability to function above and beyond the norm. Sometimes, it takes a little bit more to get the job done right. Now is your chance to discover some of these tools that can make your job easier - tools that you can't just find anywhere.
     
    Let's start with one of our favorite specialty fabricators, Motion Devices, a company that takes Senco brand tools and gives them a unique twist in function. A new addition to the Nail Gun Depot site, the Senco MD0054 is a prime example of tool fabrication that provides added value to the user. To the ordinary eye, this tool would appear to be a Senco FP42, however, upon further examination, not only can this tool be used as a finish nailer, but can also act as a floor nailer via a removable attachment. In combining the function of multiple tools, the MD0054 will ultimately save a floor installer or general contractor on the amount of tools they need.
     
    Senco MD0054
     
    Another great example, the MD4913 utilizes the popular Senco SNS200XP, converting it into a medium crown tube closing clinch stapler. The Senco MD4913 tube closing clinch stapler is designed to secure plastic and metal end caps on mailing and shipping tubes. Likewise, the MW4941 Wide Crown Clinch Stapler is ideal for softwood and corrugated cardboard applications. Enhancements to this tool include a new remote firing valve for fast and powerful operation, a high-strength compostive magazine, and an extremely durable exhaust cap to prevent damage.
     
    Senco MW4941
     
    A powerful option in the corrugated fastening segment, the BeA W-Type Corrugated Fastener Tool (12000133) virtually eliminates the need for gluing, milling, clamping, screwing and other time-consuming operations. Designed with durability in mind, a corrugated fastener is twice as strong as a regular fastener - meaning this tool is a must have item for anyone that regularly works with corrugated products, such as cardboard. This BeA tool also features a compact design which gives it the agility to seal butt and corner joints with ease.
     
    BeA 12000133
     
    Last, but certainly not least, we couldn't leave the topic of specialty tools without mentioning carton closing staplers. An absolute must have tool for any business that deals in production and distribution, top closing staplers maximize productivity and provide a durable seal required for shipping. Looking for an outstanding example? The Josef Kihlberg A560PN heavy-duty carton stapler is designed to tackle high and low volume closing of corrugated cardboard including box folding, complete overlap and more. Check out our selection of carton closing staplers here.
     
    Josef Kihlberg A560PN
     
    Whether you prefer a fabricated fastening tool or a specialty tool designed to perform a specific job, we've got you covered. Nail Gun Depot offers one of the largest selections of specialty fastening tools - tools that you can't find everywhere - and the technical support to maximize their potential.
     
    Your Go-To Source For Specialty Applications,
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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  • What's A Framing Nailer?

    Framing nailers are designed to tackle the obvious - framing - but did you know they can be useful for other applications? Uses can include anything from framing to sheathing, sub-flooring, truss building and decks. If you work in a construction or renovation trade, chances are you have worked with a framing nailer at least once. Let's take a look at how a framing nail gun works, its uses, and different options available on the market today.
     
    Paslode CF325Li
     
    One of the most important woodworking tools on a home-building site, the framing gun will allow you to drive framing nails into support structures without hesitation. These nail guns are designed for heavy-duty use - and can drive a row of fasteners faster than many woodworkers can hammer one framing nail. As with any tool, framing nailer safety is one of the most important practices you should follow. For more information on nail gun safety, check out our previous blog post here.
     
    If you are researching different framing nailers, you will find that there are two primary types available - cordless or pneumatic. Cordless framing nailers are powered by a compressed-air fuel cell, paired with a rechargeable battery, such as the Paslode CF325Li (replaced by Paslode CF325XP). The older, more traditional sibling, a pneumatic framing nail gun (also known as air-powered), generates its energy through an air compressor, such as the Senco FramePro 325XP. Either of these tool variations are perfect for the job site. A cordless framing gun will typically cost more than its pneumatic counterpart, however, you will find that it is much more flexible to use, as it isn't restricted to the length of an air hose. Consider how versatile you need your nailer to be when shopping for a new one.
     
    Senco FramePro 325XP
     
    A typical framing nailer will be available with either a bump-fire or single-shot mechanism, which will allow you to select between how you trigger a nail to be driven. Bump-firing allows you to suppress the nailer's trigger and continuously drive nails as the gun moves across a section of wood. Single-firing, on the other hand, requires you pull the trigger each time you fire a nail. As a safety precaution, almost every new nail gun will require that the nose be pressed against a surface, in order to fire a nail.
     
    Hitachi NV83A4
     
    The magazine is another area of consideration, when shopping for a framing gun. Depending on your line of work, you will want to consider the benefit of a strip nailer versus a coil nailer. Typically, construction workers and builders who work in high-volume fastening environments prefer the coil nailer, such as the Hitachi NV83A4, as it allows for a larger magazine capacity - which increases productivity. A DIYer or light-use builder might prefer the strip nailer, such as the MAX SN883RH2 (replaced by MAX SN883RH3), as it is lighter weight, easier to load, and generally a bit more versatile. The biggest consideration between a strip or coil nail gun is magazine capacity - just be certain you are purchasing the correct nail for your gun.
     
    MAX SN883RH2
     
    If you need some help identifying the right nail for your nailer, use our Fastener Finder tool on Nail Gun Depot.
     
    Helping You "Nail" Your Next Fastening Tool Purchase,
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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  • Tools To Kickoff Spring

    Despite the leftover winter mess in certain parts of the country, spring is officially on its way - starting in just two short weeks. That means it's time to kickoff spring project season, dusting off your tools - and perhaps adding a few more to the collection.

    While everyone was hibernating for the winter, the team at Nail Gun Depot has been busy at work making sure we have the latest and greatest in tool and fastener innovation at your fingertips, so you can accomplish any outdoor project - from roofing to decking... Let's take a look.

    Ready to build your dream deck? Maybe you are in the market for something a bit more modest? Regardless of size or shape, the CAMO Marksman Pro Hidden Deck Fastening System is designed for easy installation. This revolutionary, new deck building accessory will save you time, while producing a high-quality, durable deck that conceals fasteners from sight. The Marksman Pro is perfect for the amateur DIYer or a seasoned contractor looking to increase productivity. The best part? This decking accessory will work with most power drills. Simply load the system with your CAMO fasteners, position over the board being installed, and drive the deck screws into place with your power drill. System fits any 5-1/4" to 5-3/4" deckboard, with automatic 3/16" spacing and dual screw guides that fasten both sides of a board with single placement. The Marksman Pro drives CAMO screws in at an angle, concealing them from sight. If you are looking for a smooth surface deck, this CAMO brand accessory is certain to get the job done right.

    With winter weather taking its toll on your roof, it might be time to make some repairs - if not replacing the entire roof. Spring leads into the start of roofing season, so arm yourself with the proper tools to tackle the job correctly. A great roofing and siding tool to consider, check out the Stinger CN100 Cap Nailer. This cap nailer fires 1" ring shank, cap coil nails with 1" plastic collated caps. Paired with the Stinger 1" NailPac and weighing in under 5 pounds, fire up to 3 cap nails per second with this fast, lightweight tool.


    Another great roofing tool to consider, check out the recently refreshed Senco RoofPro 455XP coil roofing nailer. Built for heavy-duty use, this roofing nailer will drive 3/4" to 1-3/4" roofing nails with ease. We recommend the Senco 455XP for asphalt and fiberglass shingles, waterproof tar paper, new roofs, re-roofing and insulation board - siding attachment available, sold separately.

    Looking for a framing tool to use when building a shed or larger structure? Why not use time-tested technology? The Paslode CF325Li (replaced by Paslode CF325XP) cordless framing nailer is recommended by contractors and industry professionals for its five-year warranty, cordless design and high-volume capabilities. Take this tool from job to job with confidence.

    Arm yourself with the tools and knowledge needed to complete all of your fastener related projects. Find the answers you need at Nail Gun Depot.

    The Team At Nail Gun Depot

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  • Troubleshooting Air Leaks On A Pneumatic Tool

    Have you ever tried firing a pneumatic nailer, only to hear air leak when pulling the trigger? If so, you're not alone. Over time, wear and tear will take its toll on any air tool, regardless of the brand. The best way to prevent an issue on the job, practice preventative maintenance. Keeping pneumatic tools properly lubricated with air tool oil, as well as cleaning them regularly will help prevent wear. Storing tools in plastic helps to keep dust and other elements out - especially when sitting for extended periods of time.
    But what about the unavoidable issues, like an occasional air leak?
    If you try to fire a pneumatic nail gun or stapler, but only hear air leaking when engaging the trigger, it's likely that your tool's "O-Ring" is not sealing properly. When the trigger is not depressed, you may not hear air leaking, as the valve is probably sealed. However, once you engage the trigger, the valve looses its seal, therefore creating a gap for the escaping air you hear coming from your air compressor, as it flows into the tool.
    On a properly working pneumatic tool, when air is forced into the firing valve, this pushes the valve upward, which opens the main cylinder sleeve and allows the air to drive a fastener. If the "O-Ring" fails to seal, the air will escape, creating your leak.
    While this may seem to be a complex repair, don't get rid of your tool just yet - fixing the issue may be easier than you think. Simply stretch the "O-Ring" on the firing valve and apply grease. This should take care of the issue - helping your air tool run properly. Keeping a tool's "O-Ring" lubricated will increase the ring's lifespan, and prevent drying out.
    We must note, this is not the only cause for a pneumatic nailer or stapler to leak air, just a common source when troubleshooting a leak.
    Always remember to stop using your air-powered tool - or any tool - when it is not functioning properly. Take your tool to a certified repair technician or complete any necessary adjustments yourself, before using the tool again. Failure to take the necessary preventative measures can result in injury, or can lead to further damaging of your tool.
    Like this article? You may want to learn more about choosing the right air compressor for your application. An under-powered compressor can also lead to misfire or weak firing of your pneumatic nailer.
    Here's To Many Years Of Service From Your Pneumatic,
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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