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Nails, Staples & Screws
Nails, Staples & Screws
  • Nail Gun Depot's Most Memorable Blog Posts Of 2014

    We're finally here - the end of 2014. A time to celebrate, reflect and look toward the future. What better way to capture the essence of 2014 at Nail Gun Depot, than to take a look at some of the Nail Gun Network's most influential blog posts of the year. Take a second to check out some of our most popular posts of 2014!
    BeA Upholstery Stapler
    NGD's Top Picks: Hall of "Frame"
    1. How To Install Hardwood Floors: Perfect for the first-timer or budding expert, get start-to-finish tips for installing hardwood flooring. Learn which tools work best for the job and what it takes to lay beautiful new floors.
    2. Choosing An Air Compressor For Pneumatic Tools: If you use a pneumatic (air-powered) tool, you must use an air compressor to make it operate - but do you have the right air compressor for your tool? Find out in this blog.
    3. NGD Construction & Manufacturing Tool Index: For the DIYer or casual woodworker, find out which tools power the fastening industry. From construction and remodeling to manufacturing - we've got you covered.
    4. American Made Fasteners - A Senco Tradition: Not many manufacturers can boast the phrase "Made In America." At Senco, these words represent more than 80% of the fasteners they produce. Learn more about what makes Senco unique.
    5. How To Build & Install Your Own Kitchen Cabinets: Getting the kitchen cabinets you dream about can be more cost effective than one might think. Find out what you need to know to get the job done right.
    STAFDA Logo
    Viewer's Choice: Most Popular
    1. What's The Difference Between Brad Nailers & Finish Nailers?: An age old question, get the answers you need on the Nail Gun Network.
    2. What's The Difference Between A Floor Nailer & Flooring Stapler?: Don't use the right tool for the wrong job. Discover which flooring tool is best for your application with Nail Gun Depot.
    3. What Type Of Nail Is Correct For My Application?: Get the inside scoop on which nail you need for your project. From framing to finishing, we've got an answer for everyone.
    4. The Nail Gun Buyer's Guide: Shopping for a nail gun? Maybe you aren't familiar with what's out there. Find out which nailer is the right one for you.
    5. How To Choose The Right Upholstery Stapler: If you work with upholstery, an upholstery stapler is a must-have tool in your arsenal. In this article, find out which features are best for different upholstery applications.
    Nail Gun Network Logo
    And with that, we conclude our last post of 2014. Don't worry, we're only taking a break from blogging for the next two weeks - making time to celebrate the holidays with friends and family. Look for an all-new Nail Gun Network post January 6, 2015!
    Wishing A Happy Holiday Season To All,
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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  • New Tools On Nail Gun Depot

    Want to stay updated on what's new in the tool and fastener industry? As part of our commitment to providing the latest and greatest in power fastening tools, Nail Gun Depot is excited to announce the following recently launched tools, now on NGD.
    Fein ASCS6.3
    Let's start with an innovative - the first of its kind - cordless screw gun motor for QuikDrive, powered by Fein. The Fein ASCS6.3 cordless motor for QuikDrive auto-feed screw fastening systems is compatible with ALL QuikDrive auto-feed attachments, thanks to a pre-installed QuikDrive adapter - bringing a whole new level of compatibility to the QuikDrive family of screw guns. An 18V Li-Ion battery powers the system, eliminating the need for power cords and electrical outlets on the job site. Drive more than 600, 3" deck screws per battery charge. A high-output, brushless EC motor runs up to 266 in/lb-feet, featuring an efficient and maintenance-free design. To top this package off, the Fein ASCS6.3 includes a three-year warranty on the motor and batteries, when registering your tool online.
    QuikDrive PRO300S
    Another addition to the QuikDrive line up, be sure to check out the QuikDrive PRO300M25K wood decking kit. Just in time to finish up your deck building project before the winter, the PRO300M25K drives special 1-1/2" to 3" collated Deck-Drive screws into wood deck surfaces. The PRO300SM25K kit includes the QuikDrive PRO300S auto-feed decking attachment, an extension for stand up driving, a decking nose clip for consistent screw placement, a quiver for keeping screws at your fingertips, rugged tool case, and Makita screw driver motor. Item includes a manufacturer's lifetime warranty.
    Senco SCN63LDXP
    Moving to a tool for specialized use, Senco has launched the SCN63LDXP structural foam insulation nailer, capable of driving 15 degree, 2-3/8" to 2-1/2" wire coil framing nails. Designed specifically for the installation of continuous structural foam insulation panels, the SCN63LDXP Coil Nailer drives nails through up to 1" thick foam insulation panels. The Senco SCN63LDXP features a long drive lock out, ensuring the proper seating of a nail head - through the foam - against the substrate. The unique safety foot guide ensures proper alignment and reduces damage to the foam surface when fasteners are driven. The SCN63LDXP fastening system reduces installation time and improves productivity on the job site or for in-plant operations. Additional features on this tool include 360 degree adjustable exhaust, tool-free depth of drive adjustment, comfort grip, adjustable nail canister, e-z load design, debris shield and a five-year limited warranty from Senco. Please note this tool is to ONLY be used to install continuous foam insulation with a foam thickness of up to 1" deep - NEVER use on bare wood, metal or other hard surfaces. The drive blade will extend beyond the safety element in the actuated position. This tool is rated for Atlas ThermalStar LCi-SS insulation.
    Free Paslode Car Charger
    Last, but certainly not least, be sure to check out our Paslode Halloween Spooktacular, where you get a free car charger adapter on qualifying Paslode cordless finish and trim tools.
    Your Source For Nailer News,
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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  • What's A Cap Stapler/Nailer - And Why Should I Use One?

    If you work with housewrap or roofing underlayments, and you are still using a standard hammer-tacker, it's time to think about an upgrade that can improve the quality of your work - and ultimately increase productivity on the job. If you saw the title, you already know we're talking about adding a cap tool (stapler or nailer) to your arsenal. There are quite a few options available, including tools from Bostitch, Senco, Hitachi and Paslode, but one brand that specializes in cap nailers and cap staplers, Stinger Cap Systems' specifically designs their tools for applications that require a cap nail or cap staple.
     
    Stinger CN100
    What's the benefit of a cap fastener over a standard staple? The cap helps to protect and expand the surface area (holding power) of the fastener - which means the fastener is better able to withstand harsh weather conditions - protecting the housewrap or fabric from separating or tearing. Many manufacturers require capped fasteners be used with their wrap or felt, due to the increased strength and protection they provide. Cap tools can also be used for a variety of other applications including foam board installation, carpet padding and more. In other words, these tools are perfect for any material that is thick, but maintains a soft consistency.
     
    Stinger Cap Tool
    If you are looking at cap nailers, there are a couple good options available, which include the Hitachi NV50AP3 and Bostitch N66BC-1; if you are looking to drive a larger and wider range of fasteners. If you are looking for a smaller cap nail (1" to be precise), we suggest the Stinger CN100. Similar to a cap stapler, these tools are designed for roofing, sidewall and insulation board - check with the material manufacturer to determine whether a nail or staple is required for your application.
     
    Senco BC58
    Moving into cap staplers, a few of the more popular options, look to Senco's BC58 cap button stapler, Paslode's CS150 cap stapler, Pneu Tools Rap-A-Cap 58 (RC-58), and of course, Stinger brand cap tools - including the CH38 (manual fire), CH38A (auto fire) and CS150 (air-powered) cap tools. Depending on the material - and surface it is being installed to - you will need to determine whether a nail or staple is necessary for your application.
     
    Paslode CS150
    Before you buy a cap tool, be sure to consider these factors: manual vs. auto-firing tool; the role that tool weight and balance plays on your application; and the level of maneuverability required for the job. For heavy-duty, high-volume use, you will most likely choose an auto-fire cap tool. The benefit to a manual cap stapler, such as the Stinger CH38, the tool is lightweight and smaller in size - which makes it easier to maneuver. For most pneumatic variations of cap stapler, plan on any of the tools previously mentioned weighing between four and five pounds - before caps and staples have been loaded. Pneumatic tools also require an air compressor to operate, another factor that should be taken into consideration depending on the flexibility of your jobsite.
     
    Stinger CH38
    Need additional help? Let one of our trained technicians guide you to the perfect cap tool for your project.
     
    Capping Your Fastening Tool Knowledge,
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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  • The Senco DuraSpin Screw Gun & Fastener Buyer's Guide

    If you are working with drywall, building a deck, or installing subfloor, chances are you will be using a screw gun or collated screw fastening system. While there are more than a handful of options available to consumers, a rising star in the segment, you should consider the Senco DuraSpin lineup of collated screw fastening tools. With a recently refreshed product line (within the last year or so), Senco's DuraSpin tools are ready to stand up to the projects your throw at them.
     
    Available in both electric (corded) and battery (cordless) variations, Senco DuraSpin screw systems are adaptable, based on the needs of their user. While an electric model, such as the DS332-AC, will guarantee use wherever an outlet is available, cordless DuraSpin models, such as the DS312-18V, let a user go beyond the length of a cord - we just recommend keeping a spare battery on hand for large-scale projects.
     
    Maybe you would rather have an attachment that can be used with a power screw driver? Senco's DuraSpin has a solution for that too, with one of their auto-feed attachments. Available as an attachment (DS320) or as a full kit with power screw driver included (DS440-AC), there are a variety of options available to suit different degrees of demand.
     
    When we start talking about features, DuraSpin doesn't fall short of the mark either. One of our favorites, look for Senco's patented corner-fit feed system - which allows you to maneuver the screw gun in hard to reach corners and narrow spaces that a typical screw system would not be able to fit. If you choose to get the DS440-AC or one of the auto-feed attachments offered by Senco, look for an adjustable arm that permits a user to stand during labor intensive projects, which would otherwise require them to bend over or kneel.
     
    Now that we know more about the DuraSpin tools, what about the screws? Nail Gun Depot offers more than 80 variations of DuraSpin screw, designed for drywall, wood and metal - for both interior and exterior applications. Available in a plethora of shapes, sizes, material - and even color - there is a DuraSpin screw that will meet the needs of your project application.
     
     
    Need an accessory? DuraSpin collated screw fastening tools have a selection of replacement bits, attachments, washers and other parts that can be acquired individually - to deck out your decking tool. You can check out a variety of available DuraSpin bits here.
     
    Giving You The Tools To Get The Job Done Right,
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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  • American Made Fasteners - A Senco Tradition

    This Friday is Independence Day, July Fourth, a time in America where we celebrate the birth of the United States - and everything the nation has come to represent. For many, the term "Made in America" is still a deciding factor when making a product purchase, whether it's a truck, tool - or even a fastener. One of the last large-scale examples of a fastener manufacturer that is "Made in America," Senco Brands, located in Cincinnati, produces more than 80 percent of their fasteners - Nails & Staples - here in the State of Ohio.
     
    One of the largest fastener production plants in the U.S., the Senco factory spans a whopping 500,000 square feet - and includes fastener manufacturing, tool research and development (not production), a warehouse and office space.
     
    The trip each American made fastener makes at the Senco plant is as follows. Starting off as a spool of metal wire, each collated fastener journeys through the plant, as it goes from unrecognizable wire to the nails and staples that help build America's infrastructure.
     
    The wire enters a machine that cuts the thread into partially finished nails, including head, shank and point. From there, the nails go onto a conveyor that sorts and organizes them - so that they are all facing the same direction as required for collation. Each fastener then goes through a finishing process - prior to being prepared for collation. For Wire Coil Nails, the fasteners are then welded to a wire and spun into coils - keep in mind this process varies depending on the type of collation for a fastener (adhesive for staples, paper-tape strip nails, etc). Once the collated nails are complete, they are packaged and stored for delivery to distributors, such as Nail Gun Depot.
     
    A fascinating process, this short video highlights Senco's American Made Tradition.
     
     
     
    Your Source For All-American Fasteners,
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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  • Repairing Nail Pops - There's No Joke About This Tricky Project

    It might be April Fool's Day, but we aren't joking around with this tricky project, repairing a nail pop. Nail pops occur over time, when a nail begins to separate from the stud it is anchoring drywall to. As the nail begins to work itself out, it eventually applies enough pressure to the spackle or putty above it, to force the putty away from the drywall - eventually exposing the nail's head. Nail pops can be caused by a variety of reasons - from wood beams that swell with humidity to a settling foundation.

    An occasional nail pop is nothing to get excited about, but if you notice other problems such as severe cracking, bulges or discoloration in your walls and ceiling - consult a building inspector to have your home evaluated for a more serious issue. More often than not, a nail pop is caused by the convergence of warm and cold climate(s), which causes wood to swell and contract. They are also more common in older homes, as screws were not a preferred method of drywall fastening 20-30 years ago. Current builders and contractors have the option of using a screw gun, such as Senco's DuraSpin tools, when installing drywall. In the past, nails and nailers were typically used for drywall installation. Because a nail has a smooth body, it doesn't command the same holding power that the tracks on a screw do - making it easier to slip out of position.

    There are a couple ways to repair a nail pop, depending on the arsenal of tools at your disposal. The simpler solution, take a nail punch to the center of a nail pop, and lightly tap it with a hammer. In the unlikely event that a screw has come loose, simply take a screwdriver and tighten. When using the nail punch, sheetrock and drywall will likely chip away if the nail has not completely protruded through yet, so you will have to use spackle to cover the opening; followed by smoothing, sanding and painting.

    A bit more complex, you can also drive a drywall screw into the drywall, along the same stud where the nail has begun to separate. This is a more permanent solution to the problem, as the screw should secure the drywall in place - whereas using a nail punch does not guarantee the issue will not recur if the nail re-separates. Once the screw is in place, scrape any leftover sheetrock or putty away from the original nail gap and spackle over both the nail and screw opening(s). Smooth, sand and paint as necessary.

    Nail pops can be a tricky problem for homeowners, but can be easily repaired with the proper attention. If you don't feel comfortable repairing the issue yourself, consult a handyman or professional to remedy a solution for your nail pop.

     

    Your How To Helpers,

    The Team At Nail Gun Depot

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  • How To Install Hardwood Floors

    With the housing market slowly taking a positive turn, many consumers are beginning to once again buy and sell houses. At the same time, many house hunters are looking for homes they can rehab - giving them a chance to put their personal style into the home they will live. A popular trend in rehab and renovation, and one of the first things many home-buyers will add to their home if it's not already there, installing hardwood floors can enhance your home's appearance - and even add value. Learn how to install hardwood floors, on the blog by Nail Gun Depot.
     
    Your first step in hardwood floor installation is determining the type of wood you want to use, including species, board width and thickness. The finish and color of your hardwood flooring will play a major role in the overall appearance of a room, so make sure you choose flooring that matches your furniture, cabinets, counters and wall color. Know the measurements of the space you will be installing a new floor, to get the most accurate pricing and quantity of materials needed. Thicker wood is typically more expensive, but can add strength to your floor system. If you are working with a tight budget though, you will most likely want to use a thinner cut of wood.
     
     
    When measuring a room for flooring installation, measure the width and length, then multiply for square footage. Order 10-15% extra material to allow for mistakes and irregular board lengths - such as when lining floor boards up to a wall.
     
    Before you even begin to install your hardwood floor, inspect the sub-floor to make sure it is sturdy and free of squeaks. At a minimum, sub-flooring needs to be 3/4" thick. If there is a squeak, drive a long drywall screw into the sub-floor at the joist where the squeak happens. Be sure the sub-floor is clean and free of any debris.
     
     
    Next, you will want to put down a layer of vapor barrier paper. This paper helps to prevent moisture from forming underneath your hardwood, which can eventually lead to cupping or mold if left untreated. You'll want to use 15 pound tar paper or felt, allowing at least 4" of overlap between sheets. Secure the barrier by stapling - and be sure to pencil a line on the baseboards to show where joists are located. You are now ready to begin your installation.
     
    Start installation with the longest wall, and work your way across the room. Remove the shoe molding from the wall and create a chalk line 3/8" from the baseboard, to allow for expansion and contraction due to humidity and climate change. Begin with a long board for the first row. Line up the board's edge to the chalk line and drill pilot holes through the board into the sub-floor and joist. You will want to face nail each board at every joist, using a nail-set. Repeat this for the whole first row of boards - choosing board length at random to stagger the boards. A trick of the trade, lay all of your boards out prior to nailing, to get an idea of length and ensure the boards do not line up uniformly. Lay the floor boards perpendicular to the joists below. This will help to anchor the floor and will add to its sturdiness and integrity. A simple trick to help you determine direction, look at your sub-floor and see which direction the nails run along the joists.
     
     
    Once you have installed a few rows of boards, drill additional pilot holes into each board's tongue, and hand-nail the rolls. Once you have enough clearance, begin using a pneumatic floor nailer, such as the Bostitch Miiifn or the Senco SHF200. You can also use a manual floor nailer, such as the Bostitch MFN201, depending on preference. Keep in mind a pneumatic nailer will probably cost a little more than its manual counterpart, but the ease of use and time that a pneumatic tool saves will justify its use in most cases. You will also need to decide whether to use a flooring nailer versus a flooring stapler. Be sure to research the proper length of a nail or staple for the tool you are using - and the board it is fastening.
     
     
    Position the lip of your pneumatic floor nailer over a board's edge and strike firmly, using a flooring mallet. This will drive the nail into the tongue of the board. The industry standard, drive at least two nails per board - placing them roughly 10" apart. For tongue and groove flooring, make sure each end fits into the corresponding end of the next board. If this is not completed properly, your floor will be left with fairly large gaps. When you approach the opposite wall from where you began the flooring installation, you will again return to drilling pilot holes and using a nail-set, as the pneumatic nail gun will not fit properly.
     
    Once the last board is secured and in place, clean the newly installed hardwood flooring with a damp cloth, using only a water and/or vinegar solution. Finished hardwood is very durable, but can easily be damaged by exposure to dense moisture, direct sunlight, heavy items being dropped, or items scratching across its surface. If you take good care of your hardwood floors, they can last a lifetime.
     
    Good Luck On Your Next Flooring Project,
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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  • What's A Framing Nailer?

    Framing nailers are designed to tackle the obvious - framing - but did you know they can be useful for other applications? Uses can include anything from framing to sheathing, sub-flooring, truss building and decks. If you work in a construction or renovation trade, chances are you have worked with a framing nailer at least once. Let's take a look at how a framing nail gun works, its uses, and different options available on the market today.
     
    Paslode CF325Li
     
    One of the most important woodworking tools on a home-building site, the framing gun will allow you to drive framing nails into support structures without hesitation. These nail guns are designed for heavy-duty use - and can drive a row of fasteners faster than many woodworkers can hammer one framing nail. As with any tool, framing nailer safety is one of the most important practices you should follow. For more information on nail gun safety, check out our previous blog post here.
     
    If you are researching different framing nailers, you will find that there are two primary types available - cordless or pneumatic. Cordless framing nailers are powered by a compressed-air fuel cell, paired with a rechargeable battery, such as the Paslode CF325Li (replaced by Paslode CF325XP). The older, more traditional sibling, a pneumatic framing nail gun (also known as air-powered), generates its energy through an air compressor, such as the Senco FramePro 325XP. Either of these tool variations are perfect for the job site. A cordless framing gun will typically cost more than its pneumatic counterpart, however, you will find that it is much more flexible to use, as it isn't restricted to the length of an air hose. Consider how versatile you need your nailer to be when shopping for a new one.
     
    Senco FramePro 325XP
     
    A typical framing nailer will be available with either a bump-fire or single-shot mechanism, which will allow you to select between how you trigger a nail to be driven. Bump-firing allows you to suppress the nailer's trigger and continuously drive nails as the gun moves across a section of wood. Single-firing, on the other hand, requires you pull the trigger each time you fire a nail. As a safety precaution, almost every new nail gun will require that the nose be pressed against a surface, in order to fire a nail.
     
    Hitachi NV83A4
     
    The magazine is another area of consideration, when shopping for a framing gun. Depending on your line of work, you will want to consider the benefit of a strip nailer versus a coil nailer. Typically, construction workers and builders who work in high-volume fastening environments prefer the coil nailer, such as the Hitachi NV83A4, as it allows for a larger magazine capacity - which increases productivity. A DIYer or light-use builder might prefer the strip nailer, such as the MAX SN883RH2 (replaced by MAX SN883RH3), as it is lighter weight, easier to load, and generally a bit more versatile. The biggest consideration between a strip or coil nail gun is magazine capacity - just be certain you are purchasing the correct nail for your gun.
     
    MAX SN883RH2
     
    If you need some help identifying the right nail for your nailer, use our Fastener Finder tool on Nail Gun Depot.
     
    Helping You "Nail" Your Next Fastening Tool Purchase,
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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  • What Type Of Nail Is Correct For My Application?

    At the end of 2013, we posted about the various components of a nail and offered some in-depth explanations as to the importance of these components. If you missed our previous posts on nail components, here is a quick refresher - with some added knowledge.

     
    Collated nails are offered in a variety of degrees, sizes and types. This article will take you step by step in determining the classification, range, type and finish required for your application. A popular choice, check out Nail Gun Depot's SureFit nails, if you are looking for a high quality fastener at a fraction of the cost. Another popular choice, Senco nails offer a wide variety of fasteners to choose from, with genuine, time-tested durability.
     

    The first step is to determine what collation angle your tool is designed to run. Some degrees include 20 °, 35 °, 28 ° and 15 °. The next step would be to classify what types of collation the tool handles. Collations include plastic, wire and paper - which can be used in place of plastic.

     

    When you have completed the nail classification, you will then determine the tool range. The length and diameter are known as the range. Length is the size of the nail, each tool will have a minimum and maximum length. Note: some nails are sized in pennies (symbol, D). Diameter is the thickness of the shank or wire gauge. The bigger the number, the thicker the nail.

     

    The type of nail can be broken into three categories; head, point and shank. Head types include duplex, headless, finish, drywall, clipped and full round which is the most common. The type of point determines how the nail will penetrate into your application and the splitting severity. The most common is chisel (diamond) point and the easiest to drive. It is ideal for soft wood applications. Blunt point allows minimal penetration resistance and is commonly used in pallet construction. Flat point, also known as chisel point, requires the most drive power and is frequently used with a screw shank nail.

     

    The nail shank is the part on the nail which does most of the holding. The shank is one of four types: smooth, spiral, ring or screw. Smooth shank nails have exactly that: a smooth appearance and has the least holding power. Spiral shank nails have either a threaded appearance, like a screw, or they can have a helical twist to them. Screw shank nails are used in hardwood applications. Ring shank nails have a series of rings punched into the surface of the shank and offers the most holding power.

     

    The nail finish can be bright, cement coated, electogalvanized, hot dipped galvanized, flash-coated with zinc, hardened steel, stainless steel or aluminum. These different finishes, coatings or material of nails give different levels of protection of resistance to rusting or other special properties to certain applications.

     

    The factors mentioned above such as degree, collation type, nail size and shank diameter can all affect the compatibility of nails with any nail gun. Contact a Nail Gun Depot Customer Service representative to confirm compatibility and determine the best nail for your application. You can also use Nail Gun Depot's Fastener Finder Tool to locate the right nail for your tool.

     
    Here's To Nailing Your Next Project,
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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  • Practicing Nail Gun & Power Tool Safety

    You have your nailer, stapler or screw gun; you have the proper accessories to tackle your project – but do you practice safety awareness when using your tools? Most job related accidents can be avoided, if you take the proper measures to ensure safety on the job site.

     

    For a 58 year-old carpenter living in Minnesota, a simple mistake almost cost his life, when he accidentally fired a 3-1/2” galvanized framing nail directly into his heart. While building a deck, the man’s framing nailer slipped out of his hands – and when he caught hold of it, hand still on the trigger, the gun’s nose bumped against his chest and fired directly into his heart. Thankfully, the nail missed his main arteries by millimeters, and he survived the ordeal after surgery, avoiding a lethal scenario. You can read the entire story here.

     

    The nail was a lucky miss, but let’s take a look at how this accident could have been avoided. In this example, a simple error could have completely altered the outcome, if the man had removed his hand from the trigger. Even bump action guns still require a suppressed trigger to fire, a safety feature most manufacturers include on their tools. If you feel as if you are going to loose hold of your nail gun or other tool, always take your hand off the trigger. Worst case, a broken tool is better than a life altering injury.

     

    A factor that helped to save this man’s life – staying calm and avoiding panic. Panic increases blood flow, which can increase bleeding from open wounds. In this example where a heart was pierced, panicking could have further reduced his ability to breath, leading to hyperventilation. Staying calm and contacting emergency medical services immediately will improve chances of survival, in life threatening situations. Treat for shock while help is on its way.

     

    As described in the instance above, nail guns are powerful tools, so let’s make sure you are set up for success, which starts with safe handling:

     

    • Start by knowing your tool and how it functions. Read the owner’s manual and look at warnings listed by the manufacturer.
    • Wear the appropriate safety gear for your job site. Safety glasses should always be worn, regardless of the project. Depending on your line of work, a hardhat, hearing protection, harness or gloves might also be required.
    • ALWAYS keep your tool pointed away from yourself and anyone else, especially when activated. When in doubt, treat your nail gun as you would treat any other firearm.
    • Don’t use a tool that is not functioning properly. Have any broken or damaged tool serviced before trying to use.
    • Do not try to drive fasteners on top of other fasteners. This can lead to misfire or backfire – resulting in injury.

     

    There is no guarantee that injury will not occur when handling your tools – on and off the job site – but practicing safety measures, such as the ones mentioned above, will increase your odds of avoiding injury and staying safe when using your nail gun or other tools.

     

    Stay Safe,

    The Team At Nail Gun Depot

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