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Nails, Staples & Screws
Nails, Staples & Screws
  • What Are Scrails - And Why Should I Use Them?

    Have you heard of a scrail? Scrails can be driven using most pneumatic nailers, but offer better holding power than a standard nail. These fasteners are driven at a rate twice as fast as collated screws - and eight times faster than bulk. Available in a variety of collations, heads and coatings, the ease and speed of a scrail increases productivity and saves labor cost. Find out more about scrails on the Nail Gun Network.

    Relatively new to the fastener market, scrails, manufactured by Fasco, are available in 20-22 degree plastic strip, 30 degree plastic strip, 15 degree wire coil and 15 degree (90 degree) plastic coil. Just as you would with a traditional nail, you will need to stay within the range of fastener that your nail gun works with - visit the tool manufacturer's specs for nail length and diameter.

     
    Scrails
    Bulk and collated screws commonly feature a Phillip's or Square drive. Scrails on the other hand, are available with Phillip's, Square, Pozidrive and Torx heads. They are also available in a range of heads including flat, composite, combo trim and more. You can choose between fine, coarse and double threads.
     
    Scrail Heads
    Depending on your application, the coating of the scrail is essential. For subfloor, pallet, crating and manufactured housing, a yellow zinc coating is typically recommended. Colored screws for composite lumber are available in brown, cedar, gray and tan. Hot-dipped galvanized coated scrails are recommended for any pressure treated lumber application. If corrosion resistance is required, scrails are also available in 304 and 316 stainless steel.
     
    Scrail Collation
    Odd to look at, scrails have become a revolutionary new item within the fastener industry. These handy fasteners can save time and money for contractors and DIYer's alike.
     
    Ready to start using scrails? Feel free to contact a customer service specialist at Nail Gun Depot to ensure you are ordering the correct product for your application.
     
    Best Of Luck On Your Next Project,
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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  • New Tools, New Year

    Welcome back to the Nail Gun Depot blog, we hope your 2013 holiday season was relaxing and enjoyable. With the holidays over, it's back to work for most of us - so let's take a look at some new tools to help you start 2014 with improved productivity.

    We believe it is important to start the year with growth, as we proudly add a new brand to our lineup of quality tools - welcoming 3 PRO to our products page. 3 PRO offers a rapidly growing line of tools that is catching on fast with contractors and DIYers. We now carry three flooring tools by 3PRO, the FSN50 flooring nailer and staple gun, the S9032P flooring stapler and the S9040P floor stapler. All three of these pneumatic flooring tools are easy to use and provide the end user with a durable, competitively priced product. Consider trying out a 3 PRO flooring tool if you are looking for a less costly solution to floor installation - and don't forget, our selection of fasteners will help you complete any project with ease.

    Continuing with product growth and expansion, check out our recently updated lineup of Senco DuraSpin screws, bits and accessories. Building on our existing inventory of fasteners for Senco's DuraSpin screw guns, we are now able to offer a greater selection of DuraSpin screws and bits than ever before. Senco is recognized for providing top quality tools and fasteners, so rest assured, your project will be built to last - whether you are installing drywall or building a new deck! You can check out our selection of DuraSpin screws here.

    Another exciting development at Nail Gun Depot, look for our ALL-NEW "How-To" page, which is scheduled to launch in early 2014! Our mission at Nail Gun Depot is more than selling tools and fasteners, we want to create an experience for all of our customers - and part of that experience is helping a customer understand how their tool works and projects to use it on. Building a long-term relationship with each of our customers is top priority, which is why we are proud to offer this How-To page as part of our commitment to serving our customer's needs. Learn how your tool works via interactive, manufacturer videos and how-to posts. You can also check out posts that include project ideas, repair tips and tool safety.

    Have an idea for our new "How-To" page? Submit your thoughts to us at sales@nailgundepot.com.

     
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot

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  • Nail Components (Pt 2)

    Welcome to the second part of our series on nail components. Last week, we talked about nail types, shank types and point types. If you missed part-one, you can check it out here. In the second half, we are going to look at finish types and the importance of angle.

    While the shape of the nail is pivotal to its use, you also want to pay careful attention to the finish. The finish of a nail can determine whether or not it can be used outside, the type of surface it works with and its durability.

     

    Finish:

    Bright: This finish is used for your basic hardware nail. There is no coating, it is just plain steel. This finish offers no corrosion resistance, meaning it can not be used on any exterior applications where it will be exposed to precipitation.

    Electro-Galvanized: Similar to the bright finish, electro-galvanized nails are coated with zinc via an electrical charge. These provide slightly more corrosion resistance than the bright finish, BUT should still not be used for exterior projects that are exposed to weather.

    Hot-Dipped Galvanized: These nails are dipped in liquid zinc to provide good corrosion resistance. The resulting finish is composed of a clumpy, zinc exterior. These nails can be used for exterior applications.

    Stainless Steel: This finish offers resistance to corrosion for the lifetime of the nail. Stainless is able to be used for exterior projects and works particularly well with wood such as cedar and redwood. It is popular in markets that have a significant amount of moisture in the air.

    Aluminum: This metal offers less durability than stainless, but also boasts a corrosion-free lifespan. It is typically used for applications such as attaching aluminum trims or gutters.

    Copper: Copper, being a more expensive material, is typically only used when fastening to other copper materials. It is used more for appearance than utility.

    Blue Oxidized: This finish is the result of degreasing and heat cleaning, which leaves the nail with a blue coating. This finish is typically used with plaster.

    Vinyl Coating: Vinyl coated nails provide enhanced holding strength and are easier to drive. The downside to vinyl coating is that these nails are not useable for outdoor or exterior projects.

    Cement Coating: The cement (resin) coating is applied to the nail to improve holding strength and can make the nail easier to drive. It should not be used for applications that will be exposed to weather and precipitation, so exercise caution if using for exterior projects.

    Phosphate Coating: The use of a phosphate coating improves holding strength and provides an excellent surface – for use with paint or putty. The phosphate attracts paint and retains it better than most other nail finishes.

     

    Angle:

    The angle of a nail is based on the variation in degree that the nail sits from the vertical (base). The angle of nail required varies from nail gun to nail gun – but typically sits in a range between 15 and 34 degrees – if the nailer is angled. If a nail gun is angled, the manufacturer should list the degree of angle required in the nail gun’s specs.

    From nails to nailers, there are a plethora of choices to select from when choosing the right tools for your project. We hope that this two-part series on nail components will help you in determining which nail works best for your needs.

     

    We always appreciate feedback and comments. Feel free to reach out to us at sales@nailgundepot.com if you have an idea or request for a future blog post – or simply want to offer input on a topic.

     

    Good Luck In Selecting Your Next Nail,

    The Team At Nail Gun Depot

     

    P.S. We will be taking a two-week break from blogging during Christmas and the New Year to observe the holidays and enjoy time with friends and family - Our store will remain open during regular business hours. Keep an eye out for our next post on January 7, 2014.

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  • Nail Components (Pt 1)

    We've talked a lot about using nail guns, but what about the nails that go in them? We get questions all of the time asking about the components of a nail. The type? The shank? Point and finish?

    What makes each nail different? The average person only knows about one type of nail, the simple flat head design with a smooth shank and blunt diamond point. This is the most common style for nails used in everyday construction, but what about other nail types? Let's take a look at some of the variations in nail design and function - but first, let's go over some basic terms that define the structure of a nail.

    A nail is composed of three parts - the head (top), the shank (body) and the point (tip). Size and length will vary depending on the type of job you are working on - your nail gun will tell you which size nails it will work with. Finally, you have the finish of the nail, which represents the nail's exterior - and can come coated (resin), galvanized (dipped) or untreated.

     

    Now that we know some of the basic terms regarding the structure of a nail, it's time to look at the variations in their structure.

     

    Type:

    Flathead: This is the most common type of head for a nail. Available in different forms such as full (regular), clipped (reduced head size) and off center (head sits to the side of base), this nail's larger head size offers stronger holding capability.

    Brad & Finish Nails: These nails are typically used for finishing work, such as attaching trim and molding. Having a smaller head means these nails do not have the holding strength of their flathead counterpart, but they are able to fit in tighter places and are less noticeable to the naked eye, after installation.

    Duplex: The duplex nail is intended for temporary use, featuring a double head for easy removal. These nails resemble a push-pin, and are designed to work as a placeholder - before a permanent application has been made.

     

    Shank:

    Smooth: The smooth shank is the most common shank that can be found on nails. The easiest to produce, this type of shank also provides the least amount of holding strength.

    Ring: The ring design on a shank provides improved holding strength and can be recognized by the threaded rings that run along the body of the nail. Its appearance resembles a smooth body nail running through a spring.

    Screw: A screw design has a body similar to its screw counterpart, but is driven into wood without the traditional screw head. It features a spiral design that covers about 3/4 of the nail's body.

    Spiral: Similar to the screw, this shank spirals the entire body of the nail.

     

    Point:

    Blunt: This is the most common of nail points. It reduces splitting when being driven, which makes it an asset to anyone using a nailer.

    Long: This point is mostly used in drywall installation, as it has a long, sharp, needle-like tip that can be driven deep.

    Chisel: This type of point is mostly used for heavy duty projects, such as pallet-building and industrial assembly. The chisel tip also helps to avoid splitting.

    Flat: This point does not have a sharp or jagged edge. It features a smooth point.

    Clinch: This point is off center, but is sharp like the chisel. One side of this point is shorter than the other.

     

    Have we sparked your interest? Check back next week for the second half of this two-part series on nail components.

     

    Best Of Luck On Your Next Project,

    The Team At Nail Gun Depot

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  • Nail Gun Basics

    Don't let using a nailer or nail gun be an intimidating experience... learn the basics right here on Nail Gun Depot!

    Step 1: Choose a Nail Gun

    • What type of project are you working on? Will you need a framing nail gun, brad nail gun (for light trim and molding, this gun shoots smaller nails that won’t split the wood and are less visible), trim nail gun (these nails are slightly thicker than brad nails), flooring nail gun, roofing nail gun or concrete nail gun? Choose the nail gun that is best for you. For most at home projects, such as decking and framing, you would want to choose a framing nail gun.
    • Strip or coil? This refers to the way the nails are collated. Strip nails come in a strip, coil nails in a coil. Coil nail guns allow for less reloading, as they hold more nails.  If you are doing a big job or are a professional, this is the way to go. Most DIYers choose a strip nail gun.

    Step 2:  Choose a Nail

    • Clipped head or full head? Clipped head nails are just what they sound like, part of the head has been clipped off. This allows the nails to be collated closer together, which means more nails in the strip and less reloading. The holding power does not differ much, however some coastal states still require full head nails for certain projects.
    • Galvanized or not? Galvanized nails are coated to resist rust and corrosion, so if you are completing an outdoor project or something that will be exposed to moisture, galvanized is what you want.

     

    Step 3: How Will You Power Your Nail Gun?

    • Nail guns can be powered by air, electricity, fuel or batteries. When you buy your nail gun you will need to know how it receives power. Most choose an air powered nail gun for its reasonable price point and ample power. However, air powered tools require an air compressor. Your nail gun will be attached to the compressor by a hose. Your compressor will be either gas powered or plug into the wall. You can purchase nailer kits with a compressor at Nail Gun Depot.

     

    Step 4: Load

    • Load your gun according to the instructions. This is a relatively simple process. The strip nail guns are similar to loading a stapler. Pull back the magazine, insert the nail strip, and release the magazine to allow tension on the nail strip. To load a coil nail gun, open the magazine - inside there will be an adjustable nail tray - set the tray for the length of nail that you are using. Insert the nail coil into the magazine. Toward the nose of the tool, you will find a “feed pawl” which guides the nails into the chamber - so be sure the wire and nail heads are aligned with the proper grooves.

     

    Step 5: Fire

    • Most nail guns will require the nose to be pressed against a surface to fire. This is a safety feature so that the gun is not accidentally shot. There are usually two choices for operation: bump fire and sequential. Sequential requires you to pull the trigger each time you want to shoot a nail. Bump fire eliminates the trigger and fires each time the nail gun is pressed up against a surface
    Now you are on your way to hassle free nailing!
     
    Your Source For Nailer Knowledge,
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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  • Paslode Has Done It Again - Improved RounDrive Framing Nail

    Paslode has improved their RounDrive 30° degree paper tape brite framing nails yet again, making them one of the highest quality framing nails on the market. Let's take a look at some of the improvements, which include ease of drive and improved holding power.

    Ease of Drive:

    RounDrive framing nails now boast improved ease of drive when sinking nails into tough lumber. A more consistent coating area leads to higher retention of the nail's coat. The outer surface of the nail spine also has less contact with other nails when packaged - creating minimal coating wear during handling. Paslode cites an independent study, comparing current Paslode RounDrive nails with new Paslode RounDrive nails - finding the new nails have improved penetration rates up to 40%.

    Holding Power:

    The coating on these nails is also thicker, thanks to a groovy spine on the nail, which captures additional coating as it is applied. Paslode tells us another main reason for improved holding power results from an increase to the surface area of the nail, which makes contact with metal.

    In addition to these improvements, RounDrive 30° degree paper tape brite framing nails continue to offer the same benefits they always have, including: rigid and compact strips that are easy to handle, reinforced nail heads for tighter spacing, and the same number of nails per strip. If you're looking for an improved framing nail, we suggest you try these out.

     
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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  • New Duplex Nailers And Nails Now Available

    We are excited to introduce two new Jaaco duplex nailers and compatible duplex nails, to Nail Gun Depot. Duplex nailers are becoming harder and harder to find, but are still in high demand for niche applications.
    The first new Jaaco duplex nailer is the NP-9021D, which runs 20 degree round head plastic strip nails. The second, the NPCN-3390D, drives 15 degree wire coil nails. Both duplex nailers are extremely versatile, as they both have the ability to run duplex nails and standard single-headed framing nails. Each tool features a powerful motor and well-balanced design. They are excellent for installing concrete forms, wood blocking, firework displays, temporary wood scaffolding and more.
     
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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  • Nail Gun Depot Now Offers Full Line Of Fasco Scrails

    Nail Gun Depot now offers a full line of Fasco Scrails. Scrails can be driven with a nail gun and feature a Phillips or Square drive head, for easy removal. This product can be used anywhere a screw could go. Scrails offer an extremely fast and efficient way to get the job done quickly - without having to worry about floor squeaks or nail popping. They are twice as fast as collated screws - and eight times faster than bulk screws. Scrails are the answer to any project that demands exceptional holding power - with the potential need for disassembling.

    Scrails are available in a wide variety of types and collations including coil or strip, galvanized, stainless steel and a mixture of colors for composite decking. These fasteners are an excellent choice for decking, crating, fencing, framing, sub-flooring, manufactured housing, concrete forms, scaffolding, stage sets, outdoor furniture and much more!

    See how Scrails work here! Fasco Scrails are in stock and ready to be shipped right to your door. For questions concerning this exciting new product, feel free to contact one of our friendly staff members at 888-720-7892, or via chat at www.nailgundepot.com.

     

    The Team At Nail Gun Depot

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