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Projects & Applications
Projects & Applications
  • Video: Test Driving The Paslode CF325XP Cordless Framing Nailer

    Get up-close and personal with the Paslode CF325XP cordless framing nailer in this four video series. Learn about the tool's key applications, how to maximize productivity with it, and how you can benefit from the technical features on this Paslode framing nailer.

     

     

     

     

     

    ~ The Team At Nail Gun Depot

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  • Cyber Weekend Early Bird Teaser - Preview Deals Now

    Nail Gun Depot's CYBER WEEKEND SALE Starts Friday November 25th. Preview The Deals Here:

    Access Deals Starting 11/25/16 Here: CYBER WEEKEND SALE

    Cyber_Weekend_2016_Generic_SM

    Cyber Weekend 2016 Opener SM

    Framing Nailer Camo Hat CW 2016 SM

    Dewalt Screw Driver Set SM

    Hitachi Instant Cyber Discount CW 2016 SM

    Makita 5007F CW 2016 Promo SM

    Senco 3-Tool Kit CW 2016 SM

    MAX Banner CW 2016 SM

    Upholstery Tools CW 2016 SM

    Grex Edge Guide CW 2016 SM

    Paslode T-Shirt CW 2016 SM

    Senco PC1010 CW 2016 SM

    SmartPoint CW 2016 SM

    Bostitch Flooring CW 2016 SM

    Freeman Floor CW 2016 SM

     

    ~The Team At Nail Gun Depot

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  • Announcing Nail Gun Depot's New Headquarters & Distribution...

    If you haven't heard, we've moved! As many of you already know, 2016 has been a BIG year for Nail Gun Depot. In the shadow of our 15th Anniversary celebration last year, we launched a brand-new, mobile optimized website last spring, expanded our already expansive online product lineup for the summer, and have now extended our physical footprint - by 40,000 square feet - to round out the year.

    Nail Gun Depot Headquarters

    Our new headquarters and fulfillment center, located at 1740 Carillon Blvd. in Cincinnati, is our largest location yet. Boasting an expansive 50,000 square foot structure, our new facility includes a full-service repair center, corporate offices and call center, a showroom, and a spacious distribution and fulfillment center.

    NGD Warehouse

    As always, expect the same great service as before. Our website, phone and email will all remain the same, as we transition into our new home.

    So, what does this mean for you?

    With a larger distribution center, we will now have the ability to stock more products and maintain a greater inventory. Stay tuned to NailGunDepot.com for inventory additions, and be sure to subscribe to the Nail Gun Network for the latest product news and updates!

    NGD Offices

    On behalf of everyone at Nail Gun Depot, thank you for your continued business. We look forward to growing with you in the years ahead.

     

    ~The Team At Nail Gun Depot

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  • Tips For Comparing Brad Nailers & Pin Nailers

    The Nail Gun Network proudly presents the following guest post, adapted from Senco's "Pro Tips" Blog.

    Comparing Brad Nailers and Pinners: 18, 21 and 23 Gauge

    Senco 21 Gauge Pin Nailer

    There’s a lot to consider when choosing the right nailer for your job. The differences between an 18, 21 or 23-gauge system may seem slight, but can make or break your project.

    Finish and Trim Applications

    For finish and trim applications, the standard tool has been the 18-gauge pneumatic nailer. Its nails are more narrow than 15 or 16-gauge variations, and as a result, they are less likely to split narrow trim and molding.

    Delicate Moldings and Pre-Finished Crown

    When it comes to delicate moldings or pre-finished trim, pros will often switch to a 23-gauge pin nailer. In these applications, an 18-gauge has the tendency to split the wood, especially hardwoods, or leave unsightly marks. On the other hand, headless or slight-head 23-gauge pins are extremely thin and nearly invisible, eliminating the concern for splitting and damage.

    It is important to note, in some cases, 23-gauge pins may not have the holding strength required for a solid connection, and an adhesive may be necessary to assist with permanent placement.

    Senco Sample Finish Nail

    Things to Consider

     

    While an examination of height, weight, length and magazine size of the respective nailers will reveal more similarities than differences, there are other factors to consider when choosing the most appropriate tool.

    Senco Pin Nailer

    The 18-Gauge

    The 18-gauge brad nailer offers the most versatility across multiple applications, and is a cost-competitive option. Plus, the widespread availability of 18-gauge brads is a plus. But, there are a few drawbacks to consider. Since it requires the nose piece to be depressed for actuation, an 18-gauge brad nailer can leave a dent in softer wood. The thicker head of an 18-gauge nail can also mean more touch-up work, and because it’s the largest of the three, working with an 18-gauge nailer in tight corners can be a challenge.

    The 21-Gauge

    When compared to the 18-gauge, a 21-gauge pinner is more expensive, provides less columnar strength, and fastener lengths are much more limited. However, a 21-gauge pinner is over a third smaller. It leaves a much smaller indent than an 18-gauge brad, improving aesthetics. Plus, it’s more compact and lightweight, is easier to maneuver in tight spaces, and its ultra-thin nose improves line of sight. For example – if your project involves MDF, and an 18-gauge is just too much firing power, consider the 21 gauge pinner.

    Compared to a 23-gauge pin, a 21-gauge fastener provides better shear strength and more holding power. But, it’s about 10% bigger.

    Senco Finish Woodwork

    The 23-Gauge

    A 23-gauge micro-pinner, such as the Senco 23LXP, eliminates almost any need for touch up finishing. But, 23-gauge headless pins are not structural, and due to the reduced holding power, adhesive may be necessary to create a permanent bond. Don't let this scare you, 23-gauge pin nailers are imperative to anyone dealing with trim woodwork.

    Need some extra advice? Nail Gun Depot's expert customer service team is happy to help!

     

    ~The Team At Nail Gun Depot

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  • Nailing Versus Stapling For Roof Shingles

    If you work in or around the U.S. roofing industry, an age-old question you are bound to hear - which is better, nailing or stapling roofing shingles? Get expert advice on both options, as well as tips to calculate materials usage and more!

    Let's start with stapling.

    In the past, when it came to the debate of roofing nails versus staples, the industry was split down the middle. After all, it's no surprise roofers loved staples for attaching shingles to roofing. Staples cost less than nails, offer exceptional holding strength, and cover a greater area of space with a more versatile and compact collation. Paired with the fact staplers are typically easier to handle than a coil nailer - and a stapler is less complex to repair - it's easy to see why stapling would be the preferred method for fastening shingles.

    Senco RoofPro 455XP Roofing Nailer

    PRO TIP: When estimating nail or staple usage for your roofing project, you should budget 400 nails or staples per square. Breaking it down further, you'll typically use four fasteners per 3-tab shingle. However, always consult your local building authority for exact code requirements.

    Bostitch Roofing Nailer

    Flash forward to present day, where coil roofing nails dominate the market. But what changed?

    Within the last two decades, the roofing industry has shifted its preference toward the roofing nail. What's ironic, it can actually be argued the staple has better holding power compared to the nail. Nonetheless, here's why coil roofing nails have gained such popularity over staples.

    Hitachi NV45AB2 Coil Roofing Nailer

    While many factors have led modern roofers to use nails more often than staples, the strongest argument doesn't actually involve the quality of either fastener, but rather depends on the patience and precision of the end user. The problem with attaching a shingle to roof using staples, if the positioning of the staple is not perpendicular to the shingle itself, holding strength is greatly compromised. Staples are also much easier to over-drive, or under-drive, both scenarios that can further contribute to holding issues. With roofing nails this issue doesn't exist, because the nail has a round head - just make sure the nail gets driven straight into the shingle.

    Other benefits to using coil roofing nails include higher capacity magazine load, adjustable depth of drive on most roofing nailers, and most roofing nails maintain a universal design for ease of compatibility.

    Stinger Cap Coil Roofing Nailer

    In some areas of the U.S. today, staples have even been banned from shingle to roof installation, due to the likelihood of improper installation. Depending on region, other regulations may dictate type of galvanization or coating, or even require stainless steel in coastal areas. As always, please confirm code requirements with your local building authority prior to starting a project.

     

    ~ The Team At Nail Gun Depot

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  • What Size Air Compressor Do I Need For My Tool?

    If you're using pneumatic tools, there's no avoiding the need for an air compressor. But when it comes to compressors, you'll find they come in a variety of shapes and sizes - so how much compressor do you really need? Use these simple guidelines to determine which air compressor suits your needs best.

    In most scenarios, a portable hand-carry air compressor will provide more than enough power to keep your pneumatic fastening tool up and running. Take this for instance - a small 1HP portable unit (delivering 2.0 CFM – cubic feet of air per minute) allows a large nail gun to operate at about 15 nail drives per minute. That same compressor will run a medium-size finishing nailer at about 30 nail drives per minute, and will run a small brad nailer at over 70 drives per minute. So as you can see, the specs of the tool will ultimately dictate the air compressor's performance.

    Senco PC1131 Workshop

    Each tool takes a “breath” of compressed air, which then provides the driving force necessary to sink each fastener. The larger the pneumatic tool, the more air it requires to operate, which is also known as “air consumption per cycle”.

    PRO TIP: If you divide the air consumption per cycle into the CFM of any given air compressor, you will determine the possible drives per minute. This simple calculation should tell you if the compressor is able to properly power the tool you are intending to use.

    Senco Compressors

    All that's left to do is determine how quickly you're planning to run the tool. A professional construction contractor may need the extra juice to operate one - or more - large tools at a high rate of speed. In this instance, a wheelbarrow compressor (either gasoline or electric depending on preferred power source) will provide the necessary power required. If similar output is required, but the application is in a fixed location (think assembly line), a large stationary compressor may also work.

    For those running one or two smaller air tools, a portable electric compressor should provide more than enough energy - especially if used with an additional expansion (holding) tank of air. If you are running several small to medium-size air tools, you'll want a compressor rated for 4.0+ CFM. If you're looking to run a finish and trim tool (or similar) individually, a 2.0+ CFM compressor should provide ample power.

    For easy reference, we've included this handy chart below, provided by Senco.

    Senco Compressor Chart

    Which compressor will best suit your project?

     

    ~The Team At Nail Gun Depot

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