CALL CART ACCOUNT

ITEMS IN CART: 0

$0.00

translate
Projects & Applications
Projects & Applications
  • How To Build & Upholster Your Own Salvage Pallet Ottoman

    To make sure you get the latest and greatest tips and techniques of the industry, the Nail Gun Network occasionally hosts a guest blogger or expert contributor. Today, we are excited to let Shelly Miller Leer of ModHomeEc and the Upholstery Club take control of the Nail Gun Network, with her special project post, "Salvaged Pallet Ottoman." Pay careful attention to how she uses her brand-new BeA 71/16-436LN, 22 gauge long nose upholstery stapler.
    Whether you're sick of your old beat up coffee table, or you just need more pizazz in your space, creating an upholstered ottoman from a salvaged pallet is an easy weekend project. It's a little bit carpentry and a little bit upholstery. The biggest benefit of creating your own upholstered coffee table (or dog lounger) is that it's custom - you choose the fabric and the details. My inspiration came from a photo. It can be as simple as that.

     

    Materials:
    • A chemical free pallet
    • 1" x 4" pieces of pine or other wood to frame the bottom of the pallet
    • 1- 1/2" long wood screws
    • 2 yards of scrap fabric (burlap) to cover all but the bottom of the pallet
    • A piece of 2" foam (two pieces can be glued together to create a large enough piece)
    • Batting
    • 2+ yards of fabulous fabric
    • Spray adhesive for foam
    • Furniture legs and hardware
    • A black marker

     

    Tools:

    • Drill and drill bits
    • Scissors
    • Electric knife (to cut foam)
    • Glue gun (optional)
    Let's quickly talk about pallets. Not all pallets are suitable for an upholstered ottoman. Choose one that looks new, is sturdy, and requires the least amount of retrofitting. Pallets are rough and uneven. That's part of the charm and it's a good conversation point when bragging about your custom created ottoman.

    1. Measure and cut your wood pieces to fit the uneven bottom edge of the pallet

    2. Drill holes and secure the wood planks with screws so that they don't interfere with the placement of the corner leg plates

    3. Measure and drill holes for leg hardware. You may want the leg hardware to be attached so that you know how far the fabric can come under the frame.

    4. Flip frame over and wrap up the top and all sides like you're wrapping a present using burlap or scrap fabric

    *** The standard upholsterer's method to cover a square or rectangular frame is to secure the fabric with staples in the center of one side, move to the opposite side, then the two adjacent sides. You always start in the center and move out towards the corners, pulling and smoothing diagonally towards the corners, but leaving approximately 5-6" open at the corners for folding and fine tuning. This works for dining chair seats and all angular pieces.

    5. Place covered frame on top of 2" foam, making sure there's at least 1/2" over hang on all sides. Trace around frame with a big black marker.

     

    6. Keeping electric knife blade perpendicular to the foam, cut foam as traced

     

    7. Use spray adhesive to secure the foam to the burlap base

     

    8. Measure and cut batting to fit over the foam and wood frame

     

     

    9. This is important - DO NOT roll the batting UNDER the bottom of the frame. Secure it on the bottom of each side. You don't want a lumpy bottom edge.
     

    10. Corners are crucial to make this ottoman look professional. Make neat, tidy, hospital corners that are smooth, unpuckered and clean. This is the same technique as you'll use with your top fabric. Make it look professional!

    11. Trim off excess batting.

     

    12. Cut your fabric so that you'll have at least 3" of excess fabric on each side. This is known as "pull" - and you'll need it.

     

    13. Place fabric on top. Align any pattern, make sure everything is straight and start with the center of one side. Pull fabric under and attach just like you did the batting, only pull the fabric under the frame bottom. It's front to back, side to side, and move out towards the corners.

     

    *** The technique of pulling and smoothing at a diagonal and out towards the corners is what shows you know what you're doing. You want a smooth, even, slightly rounded top edge.

    14. Now make those corners look good by making that square corner as in the picture. Your hands are your best tool and sometime you'll need to get the frame on the floor and really be able to control the fabric.

    15. When the corner is just right, secure it with your stapler on the bottom of the frame.

    16. Trim off excess fabric, close around leg plates, attach legs.

     

    17. (Optional) Create and insert a time capsule and cover the bottom of the ottoman with a piece of scrap fabric as a dust cover by folding the edges under 1/2" and stapling in place every 3" around the bottom, folding back at the legs.

     
    Now that you have the insight, prepare your tools and get started on your own pallet ottoman. The Nail Gun Network would like to send a special thanks to Shelly Leer, who developed and wrote this guest post. If you are interested in learning more about upholstering techniques and project ideas, check her out or take one of her classes on ModHomeEc or the Upholstery Club.
    Here's To Starting Your Own Project,
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
    Read More
  • How To Build & Install Your Own Kitchen Cabinets

    Chilly temperatures and shorter periods of daylight mean one thing - winter is near. With Halloween less than a week away, it's time to start thinking about the indoor projects you've been putting off all summer. If you're looking to renovate your kitchen, consider building and/or installing your own kitchen cabinets - a project that can save thousands of dollars if done correctly.
    OMER Cabinet Trim
    Before you start, make sure you are up for the challenge. If you've never tackled a project like this before, you might want to purchase pre-built cabinets and jump straight to installation. If you decide to start from scratch, keep in mind this project will take a good amount of time and dedication to complete - especially for larger kitchens. However, for the master woodworker, the end result could be well worth the time - just make sure you have a helper or two for lifting and mounting.
    Building Your Cabinets
    If you are starting from scratch, make sure you have the proper materials. Traditionally, cabinets are about 24" deep and 34.5" tall - with a 25" deep counter top - which adds up to an overall height of 3 feet. To calculate the placement for upper cabinets, add 18" to 20" to the counter height. Subtract the difference from your overall ceiling height to determine the size range available for your upper cabinets. Keep in mind, regular wall cabinet depth is 12" to 14". Lower cabinet width can range from 12" to 60" - divided down in 3" increments. Make sure you also account for door size when planning the size of your cabinets.
    Next, you will need to cut your materials for assembly. For the sides, appearance really doesn't matter (unless it's an edge cabinet) - as long as your material is sturdy enough to support the cabinet, counter and all of the contents inside your cabinet. You might find that 3/4" plywood or manufactured board works well. Once the sides have been cut to proper dimensions, clamp your two sides together and use a saw to cut out a toe-kick (notch) where the base of your floor cabinets will be. For upper cabinets, you will not need a toe-kick. To finish up prepping material, cut the bottom panel, the face panels, as well as two base panels and two top braces - base panels and top braces not needed for wall cabinets.
    Moving to assembly, you will want to put together the base first. Make sure you have a high-quality wood glue and power drill or screw gun available for this step, as you will attach your base panels to the bottom panel. Make sure to allow the proper amount of space for your toe-kick before gluing together. Drive screws into the base panels to confirm a secure fit. Add your side panels, secure the top braces, and nail the back on using a finish nailer. Use braces or corner brackets to secure the unit and reinforce its integrity. Install shelves and face panels before attaching your cabinets to the wall.
    Depending on the thickness of board you are working with, Bostitch is now offering its all-new Smart Point line of finish nailers. Smart Point finish nailers feature a unique nose that increases the capability of these tools - while decreasing the amount of damage caused to a surface during firing.
    Bostitch Smart Point
    Installing Your Cabinets
    For time conscious DIYer's and renovators that skipped the previous steps and purchased pre-built cabinets from the store, it's now time to install your new kitchen cabinets. Installation is relatively easy - especially for floor cabinets. Simply fit your cabinets where they are intended to be installed, and drive screws through the back panel into studs in the wall. For wall cabinets - where additional support is imperative - you will also need to secure "L" brackets into studs in the wall, to help support these hanging cabinets at their base.
    To drive screws quickly and effectively, we recommend a Senco DuraSpin Screw Gun. With several different fasteners to choose from, the new Senco DuraSpin comes highly recommended by many of the Pro's.
    Senco DuraSpin
    Fit your door panels and fasten - assuming they haven't been installed yet. Depending on the type of kitchen cabinet you are building or installing, you will also have to install your counter, sink, decorative trim or any additional accessories not mentioned.
    Be sure to pay careful attention to manufacturer specs on any material or pre-manufactured goods. Always follow manufacturer assembly, installation and safety requirements. Keep in mind that this is an overview of tips and tricks for kitchen cabinet assembly and installation. Every kitchen is different, and might require additional steps or measurements be taken.
    Here's To Nailing Your Next Cabinet Installation,
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
    Read More
  • What Are Concrete/Steel Nailers - And When To Use Them?

    Typically, we look at the commonplace nail guns and staplers that can be found in most workshops or contractor's vans, but what about the tools that are not as common - yet equally important in function? This week, let's take a look at Concrete/Steel Nailers and their significance in the construction trade.

     

    For the average do-it-yourself homeowner, chances are you won't have a need for one of these high-powered fastening tools - unless you are working with the basement's foundation or building a structure with concrete. The place where concrete/steel nailers (also known as "t-nailers") shine is as simple as their name - applications that require a nail being driven into concrete. Where a user would ordinarily have to drill into concrete to attach wood or other materials, the concrete nail gun eliminates the need for drilling, which saves time. Depending on the intensity of your application, these tools can range in price and durability, with lower-end models, such as the Spotnails MT9764, available on Nail Gun Depot for less than $250, while higher-end models, such as the Aerosmith SurePin CT90, can cost $1,000 or more.

     

    Using a concrete nailer on a surface that is not solid enough can result in cracking or damage to the material, such as wood - or even cement - so it's important that you use the appropriate nailer for the project you are completing. See our article on Brad Nailers vs. Finish Nailers for finish and trim applications.

     

    Also, keep in mind that a concrete/steel t-nailer will require different types of collated fasteners than other nail guns. These fasteners are commonly known as Concrete Pins and/or T-Nails. They are harder than a traditional nail and feature a special, tack design, to increase grip power. Applications that allow concrete pins and t-nails to perform optimally include the installation of furring strips, plywood to concrete nailing, wire lath installation, steel banding to concrete, wood to metal, decking, fencing, subfloor to concrete slab and more.

     
    If you are interested in learning more about these tools and fasteners, please visit our Concrete/Steel T-Nailers page or call 888.720.7892.
     
    Helping To Secure Your Concrete Applications,
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
    Read More
  • The Nail Gun Buyer's Guide

    If you've come to the Nail Gun Depot, chances are you know what a nail gun is, what it does, and how it is used. Nailers come in a variety of shapes and sizes, designed to fulfill tasks that range from framing to finishing to flooring - depending on the user's needs. With a variety of options available, which tool is right for you? Find out the features you need, to take on the projects you want to build, right here.

     

    Let's start by covering the types of nail guns or nailers you might encounter:

    From top-to-bottom, the largest of the nail gun family is the framing nailer. Framing nailers are built to tackle large jobs that require heavy duty fasteners (nails) - such as framing, fencing and pallet building. The industries that benefit most from this type of tool include home-building, construction and manufacturing. Similar to the framing nailer, roofing nailers are almost identical in appearance, however these nail guns are designed specifically to fastening roofing shingles.

    For projects that are a bit less intense, finish nailers are recommended for jobs such as door and window trim, paneling, baseboard, casing, crown molding, furniture, shelving and cabinetry. A close relative to finish nail guns, brad nailers drive an even smaller - brad - nail, and are designed for small trim work and furniture repair. Typically, using a brad nail gun will prevent the need for wood putty to cover up a hole where the fastener has been driven - but these nailers can only be used on lighter-duty projects, since the fastener is not as large as a finish nail. Last but not least, a pin nailer might be your best option for crafting or small trim projects, such as cabinet doors and bird house building. For anyone in renovation or remodeling, having a good finish and brad nailer is key to success.

    Designed specifically for hardwood and laminate floor installation, floor nailers are the last of the commonplace nail guns that most contractors or DIYer's will require. These nailers are built to install a variety of hardwood floor sizes and thicknesses. Typically activated with a mallet, floor nailers are only built for flooring applications. Find Your Nailer Now

     

    Pneumatic or Cordless?

    The age old debate between contractors, do I want a cordless nailer or a pneumatic, air-powered nail gun? Most heavy-duty nail gun users swear by pneumatic tools, as they are generally a bit more reliable and do not require re-charging on the job site. The downside to a pneumatic tool, it requires the use of an air compressor. For workshop woodworkers, using nailers such as finish, brad and pin models, a small compressor such as the Senco PC1010 will be more than capable. For heavy-duty, high-intensity use on a construction site, look to a larger compressor such as the Senco PC0970, as it has a larger tank and is capable of providing enough air-pressure for larger tools - including framing nailers.

    If you choose a cordless nail gun, you will need to keep a battery charger handy to keep your tool running - once the battery wears down. Cordless framing nailers also require a fuel cell to provide the necessary pressure to drive a fastener. The benefit to a cordless tool, you can reach beyond the length of an air hose and can get into tighter, hard to reach areas. You also eliminate the need for an air compressor with a battery-powered nailing tool. This is generally the appeal that makes these types of tools desirable to DIY builders.

     

    Terms to look for when shopping for your next nail gun:

    You'll more than likely encounter some - or all - of the following terms, when comparing nailers.One of the most important features you will want to look for, an adjustable depth of drive lets you select how far you want your nail (or other fastener) driven into the object you are fastening. Another option to look for, directional exhaust plates allow you to select the direct your tool shoots it's exhaust - this feature is particularly beneficial in dusty areas. Last, but not least, you will also want to be sure your nailer has a jam clearing feature - to avoid lost time and/or costly repairs if/when your tool jams.

    Depending on the job your are working on, pay attention to features such as trigger size (if you wear gloves while working), easy adjustment for different nail or fastener sizes, and a rugged exterior design to handle the projects you throw at your nailer.

    Keep an eye out for brands such as Senco, Paslode, Hitachi, Bostitch and MAX, as these manufacturers all have a strong track record for building reliable, long-lasting tools. Also keep an eye out for the length of warranty offered by a manufacturer. Most brands will come with a one-year limited warranty, but certain tools go above and beyond - such as Senco's XP (XtremePro) line of nailers that include a five-year limited warranty, or Bostitch's seven-year limited warranty that is offered on select tools.

     

    Your Leading Source For Nail Gun Knowledge,

    The Team At Nail Gun Depot

    Read More
  • Tips & Tools To Build The Perfect Deck

    Summer is approaching quickly, which means its time to enjoy the longer evening hours with some much needed time outdoors. For many Americans, this means relaxing on their deck or patio. An important feature on new and old homes alike, a large, well-built deck can add major profit margins to your home's resale value. If you are considering the addition of a new deck to your home, or are replacing an existing one, learn about some of the tips and tools that will help you build the ultimate deck - here on Nail Gun Depot's blog.

    The actual process of building a deck can take weeks - or even months - depending on its size and the amount of resources you have to pour into it. Because it is such an intricate and drawn out process, we are just going to focus on the major milestones in the deck building process. If this is your first woodworking or deck building project, we recommend you consult a professional to help you create the deck of your dreams. One or two missed steps can lead to expensive repairs and time lost.

    If you are building a new deck, you will have to start with its foundation - also known as its footing. Typically, footing(s) are poured concrete that you then attach post anchors and beams to, with a power drill. Meanwhile, you will also have to anchor and attach a ledger board to the wall of your house - or the supporting structure - to anchor the deck. You will then anchor the joists to the ledger board.

    Once you have installed joists to the beams and the frame is in place, you will then need to consider how you want to attach the flooring of your deck. There are a couple ways to go about flooring installation. You will want to use a deck screw, treated for outside use - Senco offers a full line-up of deck screws. If you choose to do a traditional deckfloor install, you should think about using a screw gun with an extension, such as the Senco DuraSpin DS425-AC (6W0012N). The benefit to using this screw gun for deck floors - or any sub-floor installation - is that it has an extendable arm, which eliminates the need to bend over or kneel down to drive screws. Quik Drive also offers decking attachments that are comparable in form and function to that of DuraSpin - and come with a lifetime warranty.

    If you don't like the appearance of deck screws, you can opt for a slightly different method of floorboard installation. The CAMO Marksman Pro, Hidden Deck Fastening System, drives CAMO deck screws in at an angle to create the appearance of a fastener free deck. Like the DS425-AC DuraSpin, the CAMO Marksman Pro will work with hardwood and composite decking applications. The Marksman Pro works with most power drills, by simply positioning the system over a board, loading your fasteners, and driving the deck screws in with the drill.

    In addition to the flooring installation, you will also need to build stairs - assuming the deck is going to connect with the ground below it - and install a railing that surrounds the deck. Depending on the type of wood you are using, if you are building a wood deck, check to see how long the wood needs to set before it is ready for stain.

     

    For more information on deck building tools and fasteners, contact a representative at Nail Gun Depot.

     

    Helping You Build The Deck Of Your Dreams,

    The Team At Nail Gun Depot

    Read More
  • How To Choose The Right Upholstery Stapler

    Remodeling a chair or piece of furniture? If you work with - or are planning to do upholstery work - you will want to find an upholstery stapler that properly suits your needs. To the novice, you will want to select your staple gun based on its specific application. Upholstery staplers are designed for applications that range from industrial use to amateur fabric work. Finding the right one for you can be easy - if you know what to look for.

    For those just getting into upholstering, you will probably want to select your stapler based on the application you are intending to use it for. First, you will need to measure the material you are working with, to determine the gauge (thickness), crown (width) and leg (length) of the staple necessary for your project. Once you know the gauge of staple needed, you can find the appropriate stapler - you will also see that a variety of brands are available to choose from including Senco, BeA, Duo-Fast, Spotnails, Grex and more.

    Depending on the thickness of material, you will probably choose between a 20 gauge or 22 gauge upholstery stapler. Next you will need to decide whether you want a pneumatic (air-powered) tool or an electric tool. If you do not have an air compressor, an electric tool will bypass the need for one - however, pneumatic upholstery staplers are typically less expensive. One of Nail Gun Depot's most popular items, the Duo-Fast EIC-3118 electric upholstery stapler (replaced by Fasco-Maestri 7C-16 3/8" crown electric stapler) eliminates the need for an air compressor - without sacrificing performance.

    Once you have gained some additional experience, you might want to upgrade to a long nose upholstery stapler. The extended nose on these staple guns allows them to reach into tighter spaces. The BeA 71/16-436LN long nose, pneumatic upholstery stapler, is a top of the line tool that comes recommended by many upholsterers - including the writers at ModHomeEc. You can see their review of Nail Gun Depot's stapler selection here. Long nose upholstery staplers are typically used for more skilled projects, projects that require a higher level of intricacy. If you are sticking to small, simple upholstery work, using a regular nose upholstery stapler should yield the necessary results for your project.

     

    Helping You Fabricate Your Next Project,

    The Team At Nail Gun Depot

    Read More
  • How To Build A Raised Garden Bed

    Spring has officially sprung, which means it's time to get outside and pick up where you left off on those leftover outdoor projects from last year. One project to consider, learn how to build raised garden beds with the team at Nail Gun Depot.

    An increasing demand for sustainable living has led many people - both rural and urban - to grow their own food. The perfect place to manage and monitor the growth of your food source, especially in urban areas, consider building a raised garden bed to harvest mini-crops. Once built, these sustainable planters will continue to provide a renewable food supply - year after year.

    Building one or two of these large planters is easier than you might think - it only requires a few hours, a nailer or screw gun, fasteners, a power saw, and lumber. Once built, you will want to fill each "box" with a soil and compost mixture, creating a nutrient rich fertilizer that can boost and sustain the growth of your garden. The purpose of these beds is to raise the soil up, creating a built in drainage system and reducing the amount of space needed between plants - helping to crowd out weeds.

    To get started, dig a trench around the space you want to install your raised garden bed(s). The trench should outline the shape of the garden bed, typically designed in a rectangular formation. The size of a raised garden bed can vary, with small ones that are 3' by 6' - ranging to larger ones that can double in size. Typically, these beds should be 1' to 2' high, as it might be hard to produce enough "fill-dirt" if the bed is much deeper. While there is not a "correct" size, you want each garden bed to be small enough that you can reach the center when planting, watering and harvesting.

    Once a trench has been dug out, begin laying your lumber to create a frame that fits into the trench that was formed. Note that if you are using a pressure treated wood (or any lumber that has been exposed to chemicals), you will want to insert a layer of landscape fabric into the bed of the planter to protect against any chemical seepage. Be sure to also use only galvanized or stainless steel nails or screws, to reduce/eliminate rust corrosion.

    Build each wall of your raised garden bed separately, then attach them together at the end of the project. You will want to use either a framing nailer, such as the Hitachi NR83AA3 (replaced by Hitachi NR83AA4), or a collated screw gun, such as the Senco DuraSpin DS-312. Once the walls are in place, you will want to also install a ledge along the frame of the bed, to rest on and/or lay gardening tools.

    Now that your garden bed frame has been built, you can elect to install an irrigation system or greenhouse cover, depending on the budget for your project and the vegetation you are looking to grow. Build your raised garden bed to accommodate the crops you are intending to plant. Tropical plants will require a greenhouse-like environment (including heat in the winter), whereas tomatoes only require sunlight and water from late-spring to early-fall.

    PROJECT NOTE: If you plan to keep any plant alive during the winter, you will need to protect them from the outside elements of colder climate areas.

    After adding your fertilizer mixture and planting your crop, be sure to protect your garden from predators such as deer and other wildlife that will eat your plants. Install a tall wire or chain fence around the garden bed(s) to prevent deer and other wildlife from feeding on your veggies. If budget allows, build an open, small-framed structure around your beds to protect them from animals - without blocking sun and rain from reaching them. You might find a Hog Ring Tool beneficial for fastening the wire.

     

    All that's left to do is tend to your crops and enjoy the sustainable foods that you grew in your backyard.

     

    Here's To Getting Your Hands Dirty,

    The Team At Nail Gun Depot

    Read More
  • Tools And Projects That Are Worth The Investment

    Are you getting ready to start a new home improvement project, know the category of tool you need, but can't decide whether it's worth spending extra to get a top of the line model? We usually talk about tool categories for a project, but what about the features of a tool that makes it unique to the competition? Today, we're going to focus on a few of our favorite tools to splurge on, paired with the projects they are built to tackle. Learn which tools and projects are worth the investment.

    Let's start from the ground up, finding the right Framing Nailer to fasten the bones or frame of your project. One of the most popular choices according to Nail Gun Depot's customers, the Paslode CF325Li (902600) cordless framing nailer (replaced by Paslode CF325XP) is built to handle heavy duty work, with long term success. This framing nail gun drives 2" to 3-1/4" 30 degree paper tape strip nails without a cord or compressor. Powered by a fuel cell and rechargeable battery, reach the unreachable - this is the perfect framing tool for tight fitting spaces. Thinking about finishing a basement? This Paslode is the perfect tool to frame your walls. The CF325Li is a popular, contractor grade tool that gets a thumbs up from our customers.

    Once framing is complete, most contractors will use a screw gun to attach drywall to the wood studs. Available in both battery-powered and electrical-powered variations, the Senco DuraSpin Collated Screw System is among the most popular options available on the market today. Trusted by contractors for their quality and versatility, Senco's DuraSpin screw guns drive a range of collated screws from 5/8" to 3" in size. If you're in the market, look at the DS312-18V or DS332-AC to maximize the available range of screws accepted.

    PROJECT NOTE: If finishing a basement, stick to the basics. Less is more in many instances. Putting a lot of intricate detail and fancy upgrades into a basement does not typically return the investment. Unless budget is no object, look at tasteful updates that will boost resale value.

    Another popular upgrade, you might be looking to install new hardwood floors in your home. Hardwood flooring can add big value to a home and can help make it more attractive to a prospective buyer, if it is done correctly. Starting a hardwood installation properly means using tools to get the job done right - which is exactly why we recommend our next tool to splurge on. Known for making quality flooring tools, the Bostitch MIIIFS Hardwood Floor Stapler is one of the best-selling floor staplers offered at Nail Gun Depot. This flooring stapler has passed the test of time - and comes with a seven-year warranty to support its reputation. A quality pneumatic tool, the MIIIFS drives 15.5 gauge 1/2" crown flooring staples from 1-1/2" to 2" in length.

    PROJECT NOTE: Be sure to know the thickness of the floors you are installing. The typical range of thickness is 1/2" to 3/4" flooring, though other variations are available. Compare different breeds of wood to see which hardwood floor will match your walls and furniture best.

    Ready for small, around the house updates? For trim, molding, shelves, cabinets and more, you'll be looking for either a Finish or Brad Nailer. Once again, Senco is at the top of our must-have tool list with their Fusion line of Cordless Finish and Brad Nailers, which are among the most competitive options available to the market today. Models of the Fusion include the F-15, a 15 Gauge Angled Finish Nailer; the F-16A, a 16 Gauge Angled Finish Nailer; the F-16S, a 16 Gauge Straight Finish Nailer; and the F-18, an 18 Gauge Brad Nailer. These battery-powered finishing tools have been recognized by top-tier industry publications including Popular Mechanics and the Journal of Light Construction, thanks to their durability, versatility and available features.

    PROJECT NOTE: Adding crown molding to your home can infinitely improve appearance - and even boost resale value. This is an inexpensive upgrade that can payoff big when trying to sell your home. Look to match crown molding and baseboards for an aesthetically pleasing design. When working with a dining room or living space, consider adding a matching chair rail too.

    Last but not least, you have a fresh, new look for your home, but need some new furniture and decor to add that final, personal touch. When you've run out of ways to improve your house itself, look for ways to compliment its design - through decor. One way to do this is through refinishing and reupholstering furniture. For all of your upholstery work, make sure you choose a staple gun with the capability to take on a wide range of projects, which is why we recommend the Duo-Fast EIC-3118 (66118) 22 Gauge Electric Upholstery Stapler (replaced by Fasco-Maestri 7C-16 3/8" Crown Electric Stapler). This Duo-Fast upholstery stapler is electric powered, meaning there is no need for an air compressor. This tool will run 3/8" to 9/16" leg 22 gauge 3/8" crown fine wire staples, perfect for furniture upholstery and light wood assembly.

    PROJECT NOTE: Measure the length, width and depth of the seating pad and multiply three times the amount of any given dimension to calculate the amount of fabric you will need for your surface - this rule applies to a single surface, calculate for each chair separately. Measure from the longest point if working with a curved or angled shape.

    Ready to splurge on a quality, new tool? Contact Nail Gun Depot with any questions about these and other tools. Want to compare models? We can help with that too!

    Providing Tools That Get The Job Done Right,
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot

    Read More
  • The Difference Between Brad Nailers & Finish Nailers

    Are in the middle of a home improvement project, but caught on which fastening tool you need to complete it? If you are doing simple upgrades around the house, you are most likely shopping for either a finish or brad nail gun - but which one is right for you? To the untrained eye, these tools would appear to be the same, but in reality, each has a very different purpose.

    Let's start with what makes each of these power fastening tools unique. A brad nailer is designed to run 18 gauge, fine wire brad nails. These small nails are very hard to drive manually, which makes a brad nailer essential to any major home renovation project where brads are needed. On top of that, brad nails are almost invisible to the naked eye once they have been driven into wood. In fact, there is a good chance you will not need carpenter's putty to conceal a brad nail that has been driven into trim. The downside to using brad nails/nailer, these fasteners do not have the holding strength to be used for larger, heavier projects, such as large crown molding or baseboards.

    For larger, more bulky wood trim, you will need to use a finish nailer, such as the Paslode IM250A-Li Cordless Finish Nailer. Finish nail guns will run 15 or 16 gauge finish nails, which are slightly larger than a brad nail, giving them increased holding strength. The biggest downside to using a finishing nail gun, because of the larger diameter fastener, you will almost certainly need to cover nail openings with putty. Furthermore, if you try to use a finish nailer on a small piece of trim, there is an increased probability for wood splitting and the formation of imperfections on the wood.

    Ideally, you'll want to have both tools handy for projects, especially if you are regularly working with trim and molding. If you have to choose between buying one or the other, your best bet is to start with a brad nailer, as it can handle most light trim work and will require less touch-up after installation. If you are installing shelving or a mantle, you will probably want to go with the higher strength, finish nail. The downside to only using a finish nail gun, it has the potential to split thin wood and might require additional touch up on small trim and lighter duty projects. While a finish nailer can tackle many of the same projects as a brad nailer - and then some - the brad nailer will maintain best overall appearance on small trim work.

    Once you have determined whether a brad nailer or a finish nailer will best suit your needs, be sure to also consider whether a cordless, battery-powered nailer or a pneumatic, air-powered nailer will be the most efficient choice for your project. For the around-the-house DIY'er, you might find that the battery powered brad or finish nail gun is best, as it does not require an air compressor to run and can be used in hard to reach places. Senco's Fusion line of finish and brad nailers, the F-15 Finisher, F-16 Finisher and F-18 Brad Nailer, stand as excellent, industry-leading examples of cordless nail guns. For a contractor or individual that has a regular use for either tool, consider a pneumatic nailer, as they typically offer better long-term reliability than their battery-powered sibling - and do not require recharging. Brands such as Bostitch, Hitachi and Senco all offer high-quality, air-powered finish and brad nailers.

    Ready to nail your next project? Feel free to drop a line if you need more information, or would like to research a specific tool.

    Your Leading Source For Nail Gun Knowledge,
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot

    Read More
  • Repairing Nail Pops - There's No Joke About This Tricky Project

    It might be April Fool's Day, but we aren't joking around with this tricky project, repairing a nail pop. Nail pops occur over time, when a nail begins to separate from the stud it is anchoring drywall to. As the nail begins to work itself out, it eventually applies enough pressure to the spackle or putty above it, to force the putty away from the drywall - eventually exposing the nail's head. Nail pops can be caused by a variety of reasons - from wood beams that swell with humidity to a settling foundation.

    An occasional nail pop is nothing to get excited about, but if you notice other problems such as severe cracking, bulges or discoloration in your walls and ceiling - consult a building inspector to have your home evaluated for a more serious issue. More often than not, a nail pop is caused by the convergence of warm and cold climate(s), which causes wood to swell and contract. They are also more common in older homes, as screws were not a preferred method of drywall fastening 20-30 years ago. Current builders and contractors have the option of using a screw gun, such as Senco's DuraSpin tools, when installing drywall. In the past, nails and nailers were typically used for drywall installation. Because a nail has a smooth body, it doesn't command the same holding power that the tracks on a screw do - making it easier to slip out of position.

    There are a couple ways to repair a nail pop, depending on the arsenal of tools at your disposal. The simpler solution, take a nail punch to the center of a nail pop, and lightly tap it with a hammer. In the unlikely event that a screw has come loose, simply take a screwdriver and tighten. When using the nail punch, sheetrock and drywall will likely chip away if the nail has not completely protruded through yet, so you will have to use spackle to cover the opening; followed by smoothing, sanding and painting.

    A bit more complex, you can also drive a drywall screw into the drywall, along the same stud where the nail has begun to separate. This is a more permanent solution to the problem, as the screw should secure the drywall in place - whereas using a nail punch does not guarantee the issue will not recur if the nail re-separates. Once the screw is in place, scrape any leftover sheetrock or putty away from the original nail gap and spackle over both the nail and screw opening(s). Smooth, sand and paint as necessary.

    Nail pops can be a tricky problem for homeowners, but can be easily repaired with the proper attention. If you don't feel comfortable repairing the issue yourself, consult a handyman or professional to remedy a solution for your nail pop.

     

    Your How To Helpers,

    The Team At Nail Gun Depot

    Read More
  • Items 41 to 50 of 58 total

    1. Page
    2. 1
    3. 2
    4. 3
    5. 4
    6. 5
    7. 6
    8. of 6
Copyright © 2017 Nail Gun Depot All rights reserved. All trademarks and brands are property of their respective owner