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Tag Archives: Construction Stapler
  • Name-Brand Quality On Budget - Everwin & SureFit Make A...

    There's a lot of "generic" competition when it comes to hardware and power tools. For the most part, these brands quickly earn a reputation for cheap, disposable products. But, every now and again, you find someone that gets it right. Those few select companies that can engineer a tool or fastener to name-brand specification, but still maintain bargain-brand pricing. Over the years, we've seen our share of winners - and losers - but two of our best finds yet are just now gaining the notoriety they deserve, especially when used together. That's right, we're talking about Everwin Pneumatic tools - paired with our top-quality lineup of SureFit fasteners.

    Everwin Tri-App

    Here's why these two should be on YOUR radar.

    Everwin Pneumatic may be relatively new to market, but they are far from inexperienced. In fact, the concept for Everwin was born in 2012, when several veteran tool engineers realized they could manufacture a pneumatic nailer, comparable in quality to products from Bostitch, Hitachi, MAX and others of the like, but without the vast overhead their competitors embrace.

    Everwin Tools

    The outcome? A rapidly growing selection of pneumatic nailers and staplers, built to match the name-brand build quality a contractor or assembler requires, but offered at a fraction of the cost.

    Everwin Pneumatic

    To date, Everwin has branched into several new categories of collated fastening tools, including wide and medium crown construction staplers, siding nailers, and carton closing staplers. Despite growth, Everwin's core product line, industrial coil nailers, remains the backbone of their business. Launching with the PN57 and PN70 model pallet nail guns, Everwin now offers more than ten industrial coil nailers, mostly pallet coil nailers for both handheld and automated use. To see Everwin's full selection of tools, click here.

    Everwin Construction Stapler

    Take the plunge, we promise you'll love your Everwin just as much as its brand-name counterpart. With money to spare. But wait, there's more...

    Everwin Pallet Nailer

    You'll need a quality fastener to go with your quality tool. We recommend SureFit fasteners, designed and built to brand-name specification - but available at a fraction of the cost. With a selection of collated framing nails, coil nails, roofing nails, hanger nails, finish nails, brads, carton staples, stick staples and several other series' to choose from, we suggest SureFit for any compatible nailer or stapler. Don't forget to add a box of SureFit nails or staples to your order!

    SureFit Nails

    Still need an extra push? How about discount freight shipping, delivered to your door. Your volume fastener order may qualify for special freight shipping rates on Nail Gun Depot. Check best available rates to your area during checkout.

     

    ~The Team At Nail Gun Depot

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  • How To Choose & Use A Staple Gun

    Learn the basics in selecting the correct staple gun for your project. We take a look at construction staplers, upholstery staplers and more. Topics include wire type and gauge, as well as the importance of crown size for staplers. You can learn more by visiting Nail Gun Depot's "Choosing A Staple Gun For Your Project" tutorial.

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  • Choosing A Staple Gun For Your Project

    Everything you need to know about staple guns. Learn the difference between gauge and crown, what makes one type stapler different from another, and most importantly, which stapler is the best one for you.
    BeA Upholstery Stapler
    What Type Of Staple Gun Do I Need?
    • Construction Stapler: When you think of a staple gun, the first thought that might come to mind is a construction stapler - in other words, not your average office stapler. Most construction staplers look very similar to a nail gun, and they typically aren't far off in operation - that is, until you load your fasteners into the magazine. Construction staplers vary in size, depending on the project you need them for. Finish staplers are great for trim work - while heavy-duty construction staplers can be used for sheathing, cabinet framing, furniture construction and more.
    • Upholstery Stapler: Upholstery staplers and fine wire construction staplers maintain similar characteristics - in fact, there's even a slight category overlap in some 20 gauge models - so it's important that you make sure the tool you purchase is intended for the correct application. Some upholstery staplers are intended specifically for upholstering applications, while others leave some room for versatility. To make upholstering easier, some models of upholstery stapler come with a long nose, for reaching into tight spaces.
    • Flooring Stapler: Flooring staplers, again, look very much like their flooring nailer counterpart. Flooring staplers are designed for the installation of hardwood and engineered wood flooring. Hardwood floor staplers come in two variations - either mallet actuated or trigger actuated. A mallet actuated flooring stapler requires the strike of a rubber mallet to drive the staple into place. Carpet staplers are more of a mixture between hammer staplers and upholstery staplers.
    • Packing Stapler: Carton closing staplers - also known as packaging staplers - are designed specifically for corrugated box closing applications, typically associated with packing and shipping. Carton closing staplers come in several variations, ranging from air-powered (pneumatic), to cordless battery - or even manual - operation. The size of corrugate you are intending to staple will determine the size of staple and stapler you require. For applications in manufacturing or assembly line production, packaging staplers are also available in bench-mounted and clinch stapling variations, designed for repetitive, high-volume use.
    • Hammer Stapler: Hammer staplers, also known as hammer tackers or slap staplers, are manually actuated tools that require the striking of a surface to operate - in the same manner as a hammer. Hammer staplers are generally used in carpet, insulation, housewrap and roofing felt installation.
    • Cap Stapler: Cap staplers are most commonly found in the roofing industry. These specialty staplers operate the same as a regular staple gun, but also drive a plastic cap in tandem with the staple. The cap provides greater holding power and offers added protection for the staple. Cap staplers are used for roofing felt, housewrap, foam board and other select applications.
    Stinger Cap Stapler
    What Crown Stapler Should I Choose?
    • Narrow Crown: Narrow crown staplers are generally used for finish and trim applications, such as molding, trim, cabinets, drawers, fascias and other fine-grained applications. The smaller crown allows the stapler to penetrate a surface without being overly noticeable.
    • Medium Crown: Medium crown staplers are preferred in subflooring, pallet building, vinyl siding, furniture assembly, sheathing and similar applications. A medium crown offers a wider range of clinch, but is not quite as rugged as a wide crown.
    • Wide Crown: Wide crown staplers and staples are intended for heavy-duty use - primarily in construction, for projects in truss building, housewrap, roofing, lathing and more. Look to use a wide crown stapler for many of the same applications as a medium crown, but where it doesn't matter if the staple affects the appearance of your project. Wide crown staples are bulkier, but offer greater holding capability.
    C-Wire Staples
    What's The Difference In Wire (Gauge) Type?
    • Fine Wire: Fine wire staples are the thinnest variation of staple, generally ranging from 20 - 22 gauge in thickness. It's important to note, that the gauge and crown of staple are two different things. The gauge is the thickness of the staple, whereas the crown is the width.
    • Medium Wire: Medium wire staples are generally measured in the 18 - 19 gauge range of thickness. Medium wire will provide more holding power than a fine wire staple, but is not the best option for heavy-duty applications in construction.
    • Heavy Wire: Heavy wire staples are the thickest variation of staple, mostly found in 15 - 16 gauge thickness. Heavy wire will provide the greatest holding power of the three, but will also take up the most area when fastened. Heavy wire staples are good for applications that require stapling to a thick surface.

     

    Other clamp fastening tools serve as extended family to the staple gun, such as hog ring pliers, corrugated fastening tools and flaring staplers; however, these specialized tools are typically intended for industrial use or manufacturing.
    Bostitch Cordless Carton Stapler
    Just as you should with any other power tool, be sure that safety is your top priority when using a staple gun. Always be aware of your surroundings, how you handle the tool, and make sure you are equipped with the proper safety gear.
    ~The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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  • The Staple Gun Buying Guide

    Are you shopping for a pneumatic stapler? Maybe you already own one, but want to see what else is out there? If you are researching staple guns, look no further.
     
    As much as we love to talk about nail guns - after all, it's in our name - today, let's take a look at the various staple guns and pneumatic staplers that are available for construction, renovation and manufacturing.
     
    Staples Variety
    Let's start with one of the most commonly referenced segments within the staple gun industry - construction staplers. Available in several variations - depending on the application - you can choose between fine wire, narrow crown, medium crown and wide crown staplers. Fine wire construction staplers are generally used for furniture upholstery, light wood assembly, roof paper and insulation. Using a slightly larger staple, narrow crown staple guns or finish staplers are designed for applications that include: cabinets, casebacks, drawers, sheathing, underlayment, molding and trim. Next in line, medium crown staplers are capable of handling larger, more intense projects including: floor decking, roof sheathing, soft wall sheathing, subflooring, pallet construction, vinyl siding and insulation installation. The last and largest (size) segment of construction stapler, wide crown staple guns are built to handle the toughest of tough applications. These heavy-duty staplers are built for insulation sheathing, wire lathing, housewrap, attaching corrugated to pallets, furniture and cabinet frame assembly, or any other application that requires a wide crown staple. If you are looking for a solid, durable construction stapler, consider the MAX TA238A for smaller finish and trim applications, or the Senco WC150XP for larger projects.
     
    Senco WC150XP
    For less intense projects - primarily those that include upholstering or securing fabric - an upholstery stapler will be your best option. You will find that upholstery staplers commonly overlap with their fine wire construction stapler cousin. If you are strictly planning to use this pneumatic (or electric) tool for attaching upholstery, make sure the tool is specifically designed for upholstering - versus assembly. These staplers are particularly useful for furniture and vehicle upholstery, light wood assembly, dust covers, cabinet backs, felt insulation, roofing felt, molding, bedding and packaging. Our friends at ModHomeEc recommend the Duo-Fast EIC-3118 Electric Stapler (replaced by Fasco-Maestri 7C-16 3/8" Crown Electric Stapler - 63100) for the novice - or a BeA Long Nose Upholstery Stapler for long-term, skilled use. You can read their entire review of Nail Gun Depot here.
     
    Duo-Fast Upholstery Stapler
    For packaging and shipping, carton closing staplers are specifically designed to seal corrugated boxes and packaging materials. These tools are almost always found in warehouses or shipping facilities. For small to medium usage, consider a top carton stapler or plier stapler for package closing. For heavy-duty, high volume use, look to a larger carton closing tool - designed for manufacturing and assembly - such as a bench mounted carton stapler or post bottomer carton stapler. In the Nail Gun Depot shipping department, we are currently using Bostitch's latest cordless top carton closers, the DSW-3519 and DSW-3522.
     
    Bostitch Cordless Carton Closing Stapler
    Hammer staplers, also known as hammer tackers, are most commonly used for carpet, roof paper and housewrap installation. Similar to a hammer, these staplers are actuated each time the user brings the tool into contact with a surface - using a driving force. We recommend a variation of the Duo-Fast hammer tacker (replaced by Powernail HT-750 classic hammer stapler) for carpeting. For roofing or siding, consider a Stinger cap stapler.
     
    Stinger Hammer Cap Stapler
    Interested in flooring staplers? Check out our recent article on Must-Have Flooring Tools.
     
    Powernail Hardwood Floor Stapler
    Branching out from the typical staple gun(s) a builder or remodeler would come in contact with, there are several specialty staple guns available - such as bedding staplers and bar code staplers. Among a class of specialty fastening tools - mainly for manufacturing applications - bedding staplers are used for the production and manufacturing of mattresses and box spring sets. Designed for a different - yet equally important set of applications - bar code staplers (also known as label staplers) are used in construction, pallet/crating, packaging and residential interiors. Designed for stapling bar code tags to lumber, the BeA 380/10-400 is a powerful new addition to Nail Gun Depot's lineup of specialty tools.
     
    BeA Bar Code Stapler
    Need more information about a particular model or type of pneumatic, electric or manual staple gun? Just ask, we're here to help!
     
    Your Staple Gun Source,
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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  • How To Get The Most From Your Pneumatic Staple Gun

    Are you learning how to use a pneumatic stapler? Get the most out of your staple gun - find out how right here on the Nail Gun Network, by Nail Gun Depot.
    Let's start with loading the tool. Loading a staple gun can vary from tool to tool; however, the following provides general instruction for loading a typical pneumatic stapler.

    Before you start, it's crucial that you have the proper staples. The type of staple that your tool takes will vary from model to model, and manufacturer to manufacturer. Check your tool's specs or manual if you are confused about the type of staple it takes.You can also search for your tool's staples using the Fastener Finder on NGD.

    Once you have identified the correct staples, you need to load them. Most staple guns come in either a top or bottom loading variation. Medium and heavy wire pneumatic staplers generally load from the top, while most fine wire staplers load from the bottom.

    Before loading, be sure to disconnect the air supply and keep the stapler pointed away from you at all times - as you should for any firing tool.

    For a top loading stapler, pull the magazine follower back until it locks into position. After the follower is locked into position, place the strip of staples over the magazine rail. The staples should move freely, back and forth on the rail. The last step is to unlock the follower and release it - so that it pushes the staples into the nose of the staple gun for firing.

    If you have a bottom load stapler, locate the release first - which is generally found at the rear of magazine. Depress the release and slide the magazine rail away from the nose. Turn the stapler upside down and insert the staples into the channel, towards the nose of the stapler. Make sure the pointed ends of the staples are loaded - so they will fire into your application. After the staples have been loaded, slide the magazine rail back, towards the nose, until it locks into place. Now you are ready to connect your air supply and test fire.

    Staple guns are designed for a variety of applications, from upholstering furniture to decking and siding applications. With more than 200 available options on NGD, we're confident you can find the right stapler to get your project done right.

    Your Source For Staple Gun Knowledge,
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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  • How To Load A Pneumatic Stapler

    Learn how to load your air stapler properly. Loading a pneumatic stapler varies slightly from tool to tool, but the following instructions demonstrate how to load most common models. Learn more on Nail Gun Depot.

    First, you must ensure you have the proper staple - this will determine whether or not the tool can even be used. After identifying the correct staples, you are ready to load them.

    Most staple guns are either top or bottom loading. Medium and heavy wire pneumatic staplers generally load from the top, while most fine wire staplers are bottom load. Before loading, be sure to disconnect the air supply and keep the stapler pointed away from you.
    A top loading stapler is fairly straight forward. Pull the magazine follower back until it locks into position. After the follower is locked into position, place the strip of staples over the magazine rail. The staples should move freely back and forth on the rail. The last step is to unlock the follower and release it so that it pushes the staples into the nose of the staple gun for firing.
    Bottom load staplers operate differently. First, locate the magazine release, generally found at the rear of magazine. Depress its release and slide the magazine rail away from the nose. Turn the stapler upside down and insert the staples into the channel toward the nose of the stapler. After the staples have been loaded, slide the magazine rail back toward the nose until it locks into place.
     
    Now you are ready to connect your air supply and test fire.
     

    The Team At Nail Gun Depot

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