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Tag Archives: floor nailer
  • Nail Gun Depot's Most Memorable Blog Posts Of 2014

    We're finally here - the end of 2014. A time to celebrate, reflect and look toward the future. What better way to capture the essence of 2014 at Nail Gun Depot, than to take a look at some of the Nail Gun Network's most influential blog posts of the year. Take a second to check out some of our most popular posts of 2014!
    BeA Upholstery Stapler
    NGD's Top Picks: Hall of "Frame"
    1. How To Install Hardwood Floors: Perfect for the first-timer or budding expert, get start-to-finish tips for installing hardwood flooring. Learn which tools work best for the job and what it takes to lay beautiful new floors.
    2. Choosing An Air Compressor For Pneumatic Tools: If you use a pneumatic (air-powered) tool, you must use an air compressor to make it operate - but do you have the right air compressor for your tool? Find out in this blog.
    3. NGD Construction & Manufacturing Tool Index: For the DIYer or casual woodworker, find out which tools power the fastening industry. From construction and remodeling to manufacturing - we've got you covered.
    4. American Made Fasteners - A Senco Tradition: Not many manufacturers can boast the phrase "Made In America." At Senco, these words represent more than 80% of the fasteners they produce. Learn more about what makes Senco unique.
    5. How To Build & Install Your Own Kitchen Cabinets: Getting the kitchen cabinets you dream about can be more cost effective than one might think. Find out what you need to know to get the job done right.
    STAFDA Logo
    Viewer's Choice: Most Popular
    1. What's The Difference Between Brad Nailers & Finish Nailers?: An age old question, get the answers you need on the Nail Gun Network.
    2. What's The Difference Between A Floor Nailer & Flooring Stapler?: Don't use the right tool for the wrong job. Discover which flooring tool is best for your application with Nail Gun Depot.
    3. What Type Of Nail Is Correct For My Application?: Get the inside scoop on which nail you need for your project. From framing to finishing, we've got an answer for everyone.
    4. The Nail Gun Buyer's Guide: Shopping for a nail gun? Maybe you aren't familiar with what's out there. Find out which nailer is the right one for you.
    5. How To Choose The Right Upholstery Stapler: If you work with upholstery, an upholstery stapler is a must-have tool in your arsenal. In this article, find out which features are best for different upholstery applications.
    Nail Gun Network Logo
    And with that, we conclude our last post of 2014. Don't worry, we're only taking a break from blogging for the next two weeks - making time to celebrate the holidays with friends and family. Look for an all-new Nail Gun Network post January 6, 2015!
    Wishing A Happy Holiday Season To All,
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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  • Must-Have Flooring Tools & Accessories

    If you remodeled or built a home recently, you've probably considered hardwood or laminate flooring for at least one room of the house. A must-have feature in new home construction and older home renovation, hardwood and laminate flooring has grown significantly in popularity throughout the last 10-15 years. We've shown you "How To Install A Hardwood Floor," but what about the best tools to get the job done efficiently and effectively?
    Hardwood Floor
    To begin, let's recap the two traditional flooring tools that are available, flooring nailers or flooring staplers. For an in-depth look at the difference between these tools, check out "The Difference Between Floor Nailers & Flooring Staplers."
    Bostitch Floor Tool
    Determining which type of flooring tool to use is up to you. Today, we're just looking at a few of the best tools from each category, available for use on hardwood and laminate flooring applications.
    Powernail Stapler
    Let's start with flooring staplers. If you are looking for a top-of-the-line hardwood stapler, Bostitch offers an industry-leading line of flooring staple guns to choose from. Pneumatic or air-powered, two top-selling models include the Bostitch MIIIFS and the Bostitch EHF1838K. The biggest difference between these models, the MIIIFS is mallet-actuated (meaning you must strike the tool with a rubber mallet to drive the staple), whereas the EHF1838K is trigger-actuated. The MIIIFS is considered the flagship model of Bostitch floor staplers, but for many, the trigger-actuated firing of the EHF1838K is more desirable - especially for DIY users.
    Bostitch MIIIFS
    If you are looking for a less expensive option, 3 PRO is an up-and-coming brand that offers less expensive, durable flooring staplers. Models such as the 3 PRO S9032P and 3 PRO S9040P are inexpensive hardwood tools that are designed to compete with higher-end models from well-known manufacturers. The 3 PRO FSN50 not only drives flooring staples, it can also be used as a nailer.
    3 PRO FSN50
    Moving into floor nailers, you have the option to choose between manual or pneumatic powered tools. Just to refresh, as we mentioned earlier, pneumatic tools are powered by air compressor, whereas a manual floor nailer is powered by human force. Bostitch and Powernail offer a few popular manual tools, but many opt for the easier to operate pneumatic models.
    Wood Floor Thickness
    Two popular pneumatic floor nailers, the Bostitch MIIIFN (the nailer variation of the MIIIFS) and the Powernail 2000 (replaced by Powernail 2000F) come recommended by many users. Again, the MIIIFN is mallet-actuated - as are most pneumatic hardwood nailers and staplers - whereas the Model 2000 relies on a trigger to fire.
    Powernail 2000
    A secondary tool that's worth considering, palm nailers are also frequently used to secure the initial floor board at the base of a wall. Don't underestimate the versatility of these tools - though we don't recommend using a palm nailer for bulk nailing applications. Built specifically for flooring applications, the Powernail Power Palm face nailer is designed with a special nose that allows it to accept flooring nails, an excellent option for hardwood flooring.
    Powernail Power Palm
    There are many other flooring tools to choose from, so don't feel limited to these models - including many others that also come highly-recommended - so be sure to look at all of your available options before selecting a tool. Also, keep in mind that each of these tools runs a specific range and type of fastener, so be sure that the range is relevant to the application.
     

    Your Floor Tool Experts,
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot

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  • The Nail Gun Buyer's Guide

    If you've come to the Nail Gun Depot, chances are you know what a nail gun is, what it does, and how it is used. Nailers come in a variety of shapes and sizes, designed to fulfill tasks that range from framing to finishing to flooring - depending on the user's needs. With a variety of options available, which tool is right for you? Find out the features you need, to take on the projects you want to build, right here.

     

    Let's start by covering the types of nail guns or nailers you might encounter:

    From top-to-bottom, the largest of the nail gun family is the framing nailer. Framing nailers are built to tackle large jobs that require heavy duty fasteners (nails) - such as framing, fencing and pallet building. The industries that benefit most from this type of tool include home-building, construction and manufacturing. Similar to the framing nailer, roofing nailers are almost identical in appearance, however these nail guns are designed specifically to fastening roofing shingles.

    For projects that are a bit less intense, finish nailers are recommended for jobs such as door and window trim, paneling, baseboard, casing, crown molding, furniture, shelving and cabinetry. A close relative to finish nail guns, brad nailers drive an even smaller - brad - nail, and are designed for small trim work and furniture repair. Typically, using a brad nail gun will prevent the need for wood putty to cover up a hole where the fastener has been driven - but these nailers can only be used on lighter-duty projects, since the fastener is not as large as a finish nail. Last but not least, a pin nailer might be your best option for crafting or small trim projects, such as cabinet doors and bird house building. For anyone in renovation or remodeling, having a good finish and brad nailer is key to success.

    Designed specifically for hardwood and laminate floor installation, floor nailers are the last of the commonplace nail guns that most contractors or DIYer's will require. These nailers are built to install a variety of hardwood floor sizes and thicknesses. Typically activated with a mallet, floor nailers are only built for flooring applications. Find Your Nailer Now

     

    Pneumatic or Cordless?

    The age old debate between contractors, do I want a cordless nailer or a pneumatic, air-powered nail gun? Most heavy-duty nail gun users swear by pneumatic tools, as they are generally a bit more reliable and do not require re-charging on the job site. The downside to a pneumatic tool, it requires the use of an air compressor. For workshop woodworkers, using nailers such as finish, brad and pin models, a small compressor such as the Senco PC1010 will be more than capable. For heavy-duty, high-intensity use on a construction site, look to a larger compressor such as the Senco PC0970, as it has a larger tank and is capable of providing enough air-pressure for larger tools - including framing nailers.

    If you choose a cordless nail gun, you will need to keep a battery charger handy to keep your tool running - once the battery wears down. Cordless framing nailers also require a fuel cell to provide the necessary pressure to drive a fastener. The benefit to a cordless tool, you can reach beyond the length of an air hose and can get into tighter, hard to reach areas. You also eliminate the need for an air compressor with a battery-powered nailing tool. This is generally the appeal that makes these types of tools desirable to DIY builders.

     

    Terms to look for when shopping for your next nail gun:

    You'll more than likely encounter some - or all - of the following terms, when comparing nailers.One of the most important features you will want to look for, an adjustable depth of drive lets you select how far you want your nail (or other fastener) driven into the object you are fastening. Another option to look for, directional exhaust plates allow you to select the direct your tool shoots it's exhaust - this feature is particularly beneficial in dusty areas. Last, but not least, you will also want to be sure your nailer has a jam clearing feature - to avoid lost time and/or costly repairs if/when your tool jams.

    Depending on the job your are working on, pay attention to features such as trigger size (if you wear gloves while working), easy adjustment for different nail or fastener sizes, and a rugged exterior design to handle the projects you throw at your nailer.

    Keep an eye out for brands such as Senco, Paslode, Hitachi, Bostitch and MAX, as these manufacturers all have a strong track record for building reliable, long-lasting tools. Also keep an eye out for the length of warranty offered by a manufacturer. Most brands will come with a one-year limited warranty, but certain tools go above and beyond - such as Senco's XP (XtremePro) line of nailers that include a five-year limited warranty, or Bostitch's seven-year limited warranty that is offered on select tools.

     

    Your Leading Source For Nail Gun Knowledge,

    The Team At Nail Gun Depot

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  • How To Install Hardwood Floors

    With the housing market slowly taking a positive turn, many consumers are beginning to once again buy and sell houses. At the same time, many house hunters are looking for homes they can rehab - giving them a chance to put their personal style into the home they will live. A popular trend in rehab and renovation, and one of the first things many home-buyers will add to their home if it's not already there, installing hardwood floors can enhance your home's appearance - and even add value. Learn how to install hardwood floors, on the blog by Nail Gun Depot.
     
    Your first step in hardwood floor installation is determining the type of wood you want to use, including species, board width and thickness. The finish and color of your hardwood flooring will play a major role in the overall appearance of a room, so make sure you choose flooring that matches your furniture, cabinets, counters and wall color. Know the measurements of the space you will be installing a new floor, to get the most accurate pricing and quantity of materials needed. Thicker wood is typically more expensive, but can add strength to your floor system. If you are working with a tight budget though, you will most likely want to use a thinner cut of wood.
     
     
    When measuring a room for flooring installation, measure the width and length, then multiply for square footage. Order 10-15% extra material to allow for mistakes and irregular board lengths - such as when lining floor boards up to a wall.
     
    Before you even begin to install your hardwood floor, inspect the sub-floor to make sure it is sturdy and free of squeaks. At a minimum, sub-flooring needs to be 3/4" thick. If there is a squeak, drive a long drywall screw into the sub-floor at the joist where the squeak happens. Be sure the sub-floor is clean and free of any debris.
     
     
    Next, you will want to put down a layer of vapor barrier paper. This paper helps to prevent moisture from forming underneath your hardwood, which can eventually lead to cupping or mold if left untreated. You'll want to use 15 pound tar paper or felt, allowing at least 4" of overlap between sheets. Secure the barrier by stapling - and be sure to pencil a line on the baseboards to show where joists are located. You are now ready to begin your installation.
     
    Start installation with the longest wall, and work your way across the room. Remove the shoe molding from the wall and create a chalk line 3/8" from the baseboard, to allow for expansion and contraction due to humidity and climate change. Begin with a long board for the first row. Line up the board's edge to the chalk line and drill pilot holes through the board into the sub-floor and joist. You will want to face nail each board at every joist, using a nail-set. Repeat this for the whole first row of boards - choosing board length at random to stagger the boards. A trick of the trade, lay all of your boards out prior to nailing, to get an idea of length and ensure the boards do not line up uniformly. Lay the floor boards perpendicular to the joists below. This will help to anchor the floor and will add to its sturdiness and integrity. A simple trick to help you determine direction, look at your sub-floor and see which direction the nails run along the joists.
     
     
    Once you have installed a few rows of boards, drill additional pilot holes into each board's tongue, and hand-nail the rolls. Once you have enough clearance, begin using a pneumatic floor nailer, such as the Bostitch Miiifn or the Senco SHF200. You can also use a manual floor nailer, such as the Bostitch MFN201, depending on preference. Keep in mind a pneumatic nailer will probably cost a little more than its manual counterpart, but the ease of use and time that a pneumatic tool saves will justify its use in most cases. You will also need to decide whether to use a flooring nailer versus a flooring stapler. Be sure to research the proper length of a nail or staple for the tool you are using - and the board it is fastening.
     
     
    Position the lip of your pneumatic floor nailer over a board's edge and strike firmly, using a flooring mallet. This will drive the nail into the tongue of the board. The industry standard, drive at least two nails per board - placing them roughly 10" apart. For tongue and groove flooring, make sure each end fits into the corresponding end of the next board. If this is not completed properly, your floor will be left with fairly large gaps. When you approach the opposite wall from where you began the flooring installation, you will again return to drilling pilot holes and using a nail-set, as the pneumatic nail gun will not fit properly.
     
    Once the last board is secured and in place, clean the newly installed hardwood flooring with a damp cloth, using only a water and/or vinegar solution. Finished hardwood is very durable, but can easily be damaged by exposure to dense moisture, direct sunlight, heavy items being dropped, or items scratching across its surface. If you take good care of your hardwood floors, they can last a lifetime.
     
    Good Luck On Your Next Flooring Project,
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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  • Specialty Fastening Tools You Need To Know About

    We talk a lot about the mainstream fastening tools that most of our customers can relate to their job site, but what about the specialty tools that go beyond a traditional finish nailer or flooring stapler? That's right, we're talking about the big-guns. These tools are not available at your big box stores. They are custom built - designed with the capability to function above and beyond the norm. Sometimes, it takes a little bit more to get the job done right. Now is your chance to discover some of these tools that can make your job easier - tools that you can't just find anywhere.
     
    Let's start with one of our favorite specialty fabricators, Motion Devices, a company that takes Senco brand tools and gives them a unique twist in function. A new addition to the Nail Gun Depot site, the Senco MD0054 is a prime example of tool fabrication that provides added value to the user. To the ordinary eye, this tool would appear to be a Senco FP42, however, upon further examination, not only can this tool be used as a finish nailer, but can also act as a floor nailer via a removable attachment. In combining the function of multiple tools, the MD0054 will ultimately save a floor installer or general contractor on the amount of tools they need.
     
    Senco MD0054
     
    Another great example, the MD4913 utilizes the popular Senco SNS200XP, converting it into a medium crown tube closing clinch stapler. The Senco MD4913 tube closing clinch stapler is designed to secure plastic and metal end caps on mailing and shipping tubes. Likewise, the MW4941 Wide Crown Clinch Stapler is ideal for softwood and corrugated cardboard applications. Enhancements to this tool include a new remote firing valve for fast and powerful operation, a high-strength compostive magazine, and an extremely durable exhaust cap to prevent damage.
     
    Senco MW4941
     
    A powerful option in the corrugated fastening segment, the BeA W-Type Corrugated Fastener Tool (12000133) virtually eliminates the need for gluing, milling, clamping, screwing and other time-consuming operations. Designed with durability in mind, a corrugated fastener is twice as strong as a regular fastener - meaning this tool is a must have item for anyone that regularly works with corrugated products, such as cardboard. This BeA tool also features a compact design which gives it the agility to seal butt and corner joints with ease.
     
    BeA 12000133
     
    Last, but certainly not least, we couldn't leave the topic of specialty tools without mentioning carton closing staplers. An absolute must have tool for any business that deals in production and distribution, top closing staplers maximize productivity and provide a durable seal required for shipping. Looking for an outstanding example? The Josef Kihlberg A560PN heavy-duty carton stapler is designed to tackle high and low volume closing of corrugated cardboard including box folding, complete overlap and more. Check out our selection of carton closing staplers here.
     
    Josef Kihlberg A560PN
     
    Whether you prefer a fabricated fastening tool or a specialty tool designed to perform a specific job, we've got you covered. Nail Gun Depot offers one of the largest selections of specialty fastening tools - tools that you can't find everywhere - and the technical support to maximize their potential.
     
    Your Go-To Source For Specialty Applications,
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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  • Introducing The Powernail Model 2000

    Nail Gun Depot will now carry Powernail’s new Model 2000 (replaced by Powernail 2000F), the industry's first trigger-pull 20 gauge cleat nailer for hardwood floors!

    The Powernail 2000 (replaced by Powernail 2000F) has a fully adjustable "Flex Foot" that can install hardwood from 5/16” to 9/16” - and every measure of thickness between. The Model 2000 will install engineered products and solids alike, and will even pierce stand-woven bamboo, thanks to its unique drive blade and extra durable 20 gauge PowerCleats. The Powernail 2000 can even install most of today’s click lock systems. 
    Powernail is the first manufacturer to make a nailer that will adapt to a variety of click lock profiles, with a fastener that is strong enough to penetrate MDF cores without folding, bending or curling.

    The Model 2000 uses 1” and 1-¼” 20 gauge L-Cleats, available in five-packs of 1000 count boxes.

     
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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  • Brand New From Duo-Fast & Powernail

    Nail Gun Depot is excited to announce the introduction of Duo-Fast's DFCR175C, the world's first fuel-powered coil roofing nailer. Without the need for air hoses and costly air compressors, this unit is great for both homeowners and professionals alike.
    Another one of a kind tool, the new Powernail Power Palm flooring nailer makes blind and face nailing a breeze. This palm nailer gets as close to the wall as possible - compared to other trim or face nailer options.
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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