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Tag Archives: how to
  • DIY Tips: How To Install Flawless Drywall

    In honor of Nail Gun Depot's Screw Gun Showdown, let's take a look at one of the top uses for a screw fastening system, installing drywall. An important step in any major home renovation or remodeling project, knowing how to install drywall can save time and money. Learn how to install drywall, the best tools for the job, and other useful DIY tips - here on the Nail Gun Network.
    Quik Drive Drywall Attachment
    Most new construction projects mandate the use of drywall screws when installing drywall. Screws are certainly ideal, as their thread provides better holding power - especially in climates where wood is prone to expand and contract regularly. In some circumstances, drywall nails can be used to hang wallboard, but beware, over time nail popping and other imperfections to the wall might occur as the wood frame expands and contracts. For long-term quality, we recommend using collated drywall screws and a screw gun - for fast, easy, cost-effective drywall installation. Senco DuraSpin and Simpson Quik Drive are two competitive screw fastening systems that continue to offer best-in-class performance.
    Project Note: Most Drywall Screws Require A Phillips Drive.
    Another benefit to using screws over nails for drywall installation, it generally takes less screws to complete the project. Be certain to consult your local building code before beginning installation of drywall, as different regions have different requirements. Beyond building code, don't fall victim to silly, yet expensive errors.
    Senco DuraSpin Drywall Installation
    Even for beginners, drywall installation is relatively easy to pick up. Just pay careful attention to the following:
    • Prior to installation, make sure the lumber you are fastening drywall board to is within an acceptable range of moisture content, less than 19 percent by most standards. As damp wood dries out, it can lead to popping of fasteners - and splitting at seams.
    • Don't overlook sagging panels - particularly when installing a ceiling. Make sure to drive extra screws into place while pressing firmly on the loose board. In some extreme cases, an additional brace or bracket may be required to guarantee a firm fit. Likewise, watch for bulging at your vertical seams. If the drywall board swells at the seam - once it has been taped and sealed - it may require sanding. You can prevent this issue by ensuring there is no gap between drywall boards during installation.
    • Don't take the easy route when it comes to corners. Use a corner guard versus drywall tape and spackle. A corner guard will hold up better in the long run and is typically easier to work with than tape. You should also mark your studs and joists prior to installation of a drywall board. This will help improve the accuracy of your drive and will prevent additional repair work in problem areas.
    • Watch for imperfections in drywall tape. Don't ignore bubbles, streaks, splits or other noticeable imperfections in drywall tape as it is laid. If air is allowed between the tape and base, it will lead to separation later on. Tape that is not secured properly can eventually peel and will require repair and repainting. In areas where warm and cold air are allowed to converge regularly, eventual loosening and separation of tape from the drywall base is almost inevitable.
    • Make sure your screw gun is set to the proper depth. Depending on the thickness of the board, determine the appropriate screw length and depth adjustment for your tool. Driving too deep can cause noticeable divets in the drywall. Driving too short leaves the screw's head protruding. If installed properly, the screw's head should sit slightly below the drywall surface - leaving just enough room for compound to smooth the surface.
    Drywall Board
    To recap, make sure your framing is dry, mark your studs and joists for accurate drive locations, hold the drywall board firmly against the wood frame while fastening in place, line up boards for accuracy, scan and repair imperfections, and enjoy.
    Here's To Flawless DIY Drywall,
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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  • How To Install Hardwood Floors

    With the housing market slowly taking a positive turn, many consumers are beginning to once again buy and sell houses. At the same time, many house hunters are looking for homes they can rehab - giving them a chance to put their personal style into the home they will live. A popular trend in rehab and renovation, and one of the first things many home-buyers will add to their home if it's not already there, installing hardwood floors can enhance your home's appearance - and even add value. Learn how to install hardwood floors, on the blog by Nail Gun Depot.
     
    Your first step in hardwood floor installation is determining the type of wood you want to use, including species, board width and thickness. The finish and color of your hardwood flooring will play a major role in the overall appearance of a room, so make sure you choose flooring that matches your furniture, cabinets, counters and wall color. Know the measurements of the space you will be installing a new floor, to get the most accurate pricing and quantity of materials needed. Thicker wood is typically more expensive, but can add strength to your floor system. If you are working with a tight budget though, you will most likely want to use a thinner cut of wood.
     
     
    When measuring a room for flooring installation, measure the width and length, then multiply for square footage. Order 10-15% extra material to allow for mistakes and irregular board lengths - such as when lining floor boards up to a wall.
     
    Before you even begin to install your hardwood floor, inspect the sub-floor to make sure it is sturdy and free of squeaks. At a minimum, sub-flooring needs to be 3/4" thick. If there is a squeak, drive a long drywall screw into the sub-floor at the joist where the squeak happens. Be sure the sub-floor is clean and free of any debris.
     
     
    Next, you will want to put down a layer of vapor barrier paper. This paper helps to prevent moisture from forming underneath your hardwood, which can eventually lead to cupping or mold if left untreated. You'll want to use 15 pound tar paper or felt, allowing at least 4" of overlap between sheets. Secure the barrier by stapling - and be sure to pencil a line on the baseboards to show where joists are located. You are now ready to begin your installation.
     
    Start installation with the longest wall, and work your way across the room. Remove the shoe molding from the wall and create a chalk line 3/8" from the baseboard, to allow for expansion and contraction due to humidity and climate change. Begin with a long board for the first row. Line up the board's edge to the chalk line and drill pilot holes through the board into the sub-floor and joist. You will want to face nail each board at every joist, using a nail-set. Repeat this for the whole first row of boards - choosing board length at random to stagger the boards. A trick of the trade, lay all of your boards out prior to nailing, to get an idea of length and ensure the boards do not line up uniformly. Lay the floor boards perpendicular to the joists below. This will help to anchor the floor and will add to its sturdiness and integrity. A simple trick to help you determine direction, look at your sub-floor and see which direction the nails run along the joists.
     
     
    Once you have installed a few rows of boards, drill additional pilot holes into each board's tongue, and hand-nail the rolls. Once you have enough clearance, begin using a pneumatic floor nailer, such as the Bostitch Miiifn or the Senco SHF200. You can also use a manual floor nailer, such as the Bostitch MFN201, depending on preference. Keep in mind a pneumatic nailer will probably cost a little more than its manual counterpart, but the ease of use and time that a pneumatic tool saves will justify its use in most cases. You will also need to decide whether to use a flooring nailer versus a flooring stapler. Be sure to research the proper length of a nail or staple for the tool you are using - and the board it is fastening.
     
     
    Position the lip of your pneumatic floor nailer over a board's edge and strike firmly, using a flooring mallet. This will drive the nail into the tongue of the board. The industry standard, drive at least two nails per board - placing them roughly 10" apart. For tongue and groove flooring, make sure each end fits into the corresponding end of the next board. If this is not completed properly, your floor will be left with fairly large gaps. When you approach the opposite wall from where you began the flooring installation, you will again return to drilling pilot holes and using a nail-set, as the pneumatic nail gun will not fit properly.
     
    Once the last board is secured and in place, clean the newly installed hardwood flooring with a damp cloth, using only a water and/or vinegar solution. Finished hardwood is very durable, but can easily be damaged by exposure to dense moisture, direct sunlight, heavy items being dropped, or items scratching across its surface. If you take good care of your hardwood floors, they can last a lifetime.
     
    Good Luck On Your Next Flooring Project,
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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  • Troubleshooting Air Leaks On A Pneumatic Tool

    Have you ever tried firing a pneumatic nailer, only to hear air leak when pulling the trigger? If so, you're not alone. Over time, wear and tear will take its toll on any air tool, regardless of the brand. The best way to prevent an issue on the job, practice preventative maintenance. Keeping pneumatic tools properly lubricated with air tool oil, as well as cleaning them regularly will help prevent wear. Storing tools in plastic helps to keep dust and other elements out - especially when sitting for extended periods of time.
    But what about the unavoidable issues, like an occasional air leak?
    If you try to fire a pneumatic nail gun or stapler, but only hear air leaking when engaging the trigger, it's likely that your tool's "O-Ring" is not sealing properly. When the trigger is not depressed, you may not hear air leaking, as the valve is probably sealed. However, once you engage the trigger, the valve looses its seal, therefore creating a gap for the escaping air you hear coming from your air compressor, as it flows into the tool.
    On a properly working pneumatic tool, when air is forced into the firing valve, this pushes the valve upward, which opens the main cylinder sleeve and allows the air to drive a fastener. If the "O-Ring" fails to seal, the air will escape, creating your leak.
    While this may seem to be a complex repair, don't get rid of your tool just yet - fixing the issue may be easier than you think. Simply stretch the "O-Ring" on the firing valve and apply grease. This should take care of the issue - helping your air tool run properly. Keeping a tool's "O-Ring" lubricated will increase the ring's lifespan, and prevent drying out.
    We must note, this is not the only cause for a pneumatic nailer or stapler to leak air, just a common source when troubleshooting a leak.
    Always remember to stop using your air-powered tool - or any tool - when it is not functioning properly. Take your tool to a certified repair technician or complete any necessary adjustments yourself, before using the tool again. Failure to take the necessary preventative measures can result in injury, or can lead to further damaging of your tool.
    Like this article? You may want to learn more about choosing the right air compressor for your application. An under-powered compressor can also lead to misfire or weak firing of your pneumatic nailer.
    Here's To Many Years Of Service From Your Pneumatic,
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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