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Tag Archives: max
  • Introduction To Air Compressors

    Welcome back to a new year of the Nail Gun Network! We hope you had a relaxing holiday break - but alas, it's time to get back to work. Easing into the routine swing, let's start 2015 with a breakdown and categorization of air compressors - so you can find the right compressor to handle your projects.
    Senco Air Compressors
    If you use pneumatic (air-powered) fastening tools, you have to use an air compressor to bring them to life. Air compressors provide power to your pneumatic nail guns, staple guns, paint sprayers, ratchets and other air-driven tools - they can also be used to inflate tires, blow dust or debris, and more. The application(s) you need an air compressor for, will determine the type of compressor you require.
    Senco Compressor Kit
    First, let's take a brief look at how an air compressor works. Air compressors feature a motor, which forces air into a storage tank. Depending on the type of compressor, a user will attach their tool(s) to the compressor via an air hose or hoses. Every time the user fires their pneumatic tool, air in the storage tank is released through the air hose - activating the tool. As the storage tank depletes its air, the motor kicks-in and returns the tank to a designated air pressure. For some compressors, such as MAX's AKHL1250E, an expansion tank is also available.
    MAX Expansion Air Tank
    Smaller projects - with low volume use - can typically get by with a smaller, single-stage compressor. Single-stage compressors feature one-piston motors, which force air into their storage tank for consumption. As the compressor depletes its supply of air, the motor kicks back on to replenish it. These compressors are typically useful for small workshops, residential garages, or DIY applications. Because they are typically smaller in size, they are also useful for renovation and remodeling projects, where space might be limited. Keep in mind, these compressors are not designed to power multiple tools at once - or tools that require a good amount of energy to fire, such as framing nailers. Finish and trim nailers and fine wire staplers are typically intended for this type of compressor.
    Bostitch Trim
    For heavy-duty applications in construction or manufacturing, such as home-building, assembly line work and more, two-stage compressors should be a better fit for use. Two-stage air compressors feature a second piston - providing quicker refill times to the storage tank. The storage tank is also typically larger in size, allowing more air to be stored during use. Two-stage compressors are also designed to power multiple tools at once - improving operation efficiency. The downside to these compressors, they typically weigh more, are more expensive, and make more noise during operation.
    Bostitch Pneumatic Framing
    When shopping for an air compressor, consider the manufacturer required pressure for the tool(s) you are looking to power. Every manufacturer should provide the CFM and PSI required to operate safely. The CFM or Cubic Feet per Minute determines how many tools can be run at once on an air compressor. The PSI or Pounds per Square Inch directs the maximum range of operating pressure with which an air compressor can run properly. Disregarding either of these factors can lead to permanent damage to your tools and/or air compressor - as well as possible injury to the user. When selecting an air compressor, choose a model with a higher CFM rating than the tool or tools you are planning to operate - this will allow for a margin of error.
    Senco PC1010N
    When you start shopping for a compressor, you will also notice the difference in design between certain models. Depending on your application, there are four main designs available for portable air compressors. Generally, the most basic option available, most hot dog shaped compressors have small, cylindrical tanks - this style is generally the easiest to transport, but offers the least power. Models such as the Senco PC1010 exemplify a well-built, popular compressor within this segment. Similar in size, a pancake compressor features an oblong tank that resembles the shape of a tire. Bostitch offers the BTFP02011 pancake compressor (replaced by Bostitch BTFP02012) as part of a 3-tool combo kit for finish and trim. Still capable of being carried by hand, twin-stack compressors feature two tanks (generally one above the other), which allows them to restore maximum air pressure quicker than a single-tank design, such as the hot dog or pancake. A great example of the twin-stack compressor, RolAir offers its FC2002 model - also known as "The Bull" for its rugged nature. One of the heaviest-duty designs for portable compressors, wheelbarrow compressors are too heavy to carry by hand, but feature a single-wheel design with handles - allowing this type of compressor to be rolled from jobsite to jobsite. J-Air is a reliable, popular manufacturer of this style compressor. For fixed workstations that require high-volume use, stationary compressors are also available. There is also a selection of other wheeled compressors available for heavy-duty use, that function similarly to the wheelbarrow design.
    RolAir Bull Compressor
    One final point to consider, determine the source of power that will work best for your compressor. For almost every hot dog, pancake or twin-stack compressor, electric power is your only available option. However, larger compressors, such as wheelbarrow models, generally are available with either the option for gasoline or electric power. Crews in new construction tend to favor gas power, as it can sometimes be hard to find electric on a jobsite. Many gas-powered compressors also feature more powerful motors. Depending on the application - and if electric is easily accessible - you might prefer the emission-free design of electric compressors though.
    J-Air Compressors
    If you work in cold climates, make sure you shop for a compressor with a cold start valve. Many compressors include this feature out of the box, but if not, you could have a hard time starting your air compressor in frigid temperatures. Standard on many new compressors, an oil-free pump design reduces wear and tear maintenance. For high-volume use, check to make sure the compressor includes more than one connection for pneumatic air hoses - to ensure you can run several tools at once. Also, make sure the compressor has the proper cooling systems installed to handle the applications you plan to use it for - this will help to avoid overheating or damage to the compressor motor.
     
    Bostitch 3-Tool Combo Kit
    Last, but not least, consider the manufacturer of your future compressor. There are several reliable brands available, some of which we recommend, including compressors from Senco, RolAir, J-Air, MAX and Bostitch. Be sure to compare each compressor's features prior to making a purchase.
    Blowing Away Your Air Compressor Knowledge,
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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  • Visiting The 2014 STAFDA Show

    You were probably surprised to see there wasn't a new NGD blog post yesterday. Well, we're making up for it today, now that we're back from STAFDA.
    STAFDA 2014
    To summarize the entire 2014 STAFDA show, we would have to write a book. With several hundred exhibitors - and many more attendees - STAFDA is a mecca for the tool and fastener industry. Every year, the Specialty Tools & Fasteners Distributors Association (STAFDA) puts on the event, hosting the convention in various cities across the U.S.
    STAFDA 2014
    This year, STAFDA visited Charlotte, NC. Home to the NASCAR Hall of Fame and other attractions, here's a brief overview of NGD's trip to North Carolina.
    Charlotte, NC
    As tool and fastener technology continues to grow, STAFDA is a great place to catch a glimpse of the latest and greatest within the industry. Among highlights of the show, we caught a close-up glance at the Bostitch Smart Point nailers - as well as their all-new cordless carton closing staplers. We also saw QuikDrive's new cordless motor (powered by Fein), capable for use with all QuikDrive attachments. Stinger featured all of their cap fastening tools - and we saw an up close demonstration of the stand-up CAMO hidden-deck fastening tool.
    CAMO EdgePro
    From Senco, STAFDA served as the launching point for two new tools, the RoofPro 445XP and the SCN63LDXP structural foam insulation nailer. MAX displayed their completely refreshed CN565S2 coil siding nailer - and Jaaco featured their ballistic pin tool (designed for fastening foam board to wood, steel and concrete - with available nosepiece attachments for washers).
    Pneu Tools
    Pneu Tools also debuted their new concept, a camouflage tool color scheme - pictured above. And we visited our friends at Cadex to check out their rock-solid line of finish and trim tools - including the CB18.50A (replaced by Cadex V2/18.50).
    BeA Rolling Tool
    We also got the chance to view and demo some new and exciting product lines - including products that are still in the concept phase. For 2015, look for new tools from Grex, Fasco, BeA, Everwin, Omer and many of your other favorite brands. Look for expanded product offerings on NGD as well - with new attachments, compressors and accessories coming to the site. For those interested in automated fastening solutions, we have something special in the works as well.
    Your Tool & Fastener Experts,
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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  • Top Resources For Tool Testing & Comparison

    Looking for a comprehensive overview of features, quality and value for your next fastening tool? Want an expert opinion? Getting the answers you need can be easier than many think - especially in the Internet Age. Let's take a look at some of NGD's favorite sources for tool and fastener reviews. Tested first by the pros - so you can get the best in quality and value.
    Nailers
    For those that still rely on print publications for tool news, these magazines have become a "staple" in workshops across the country:
    Journal of Light Construction - One of the most trusted sources for tool reviews, the Journal of Light Construction (JLC) provides construction industry insight - with a heavy emphasis on the tools that power your projects. Get tips, tricks and unbiased knowledge from the pro's of this industry. JLC covers a wide variety of tools, including reviews for Senco, Bostitch, Hitachi, MAX and other key players within the fastening tool segment. Issues reflect specific industries including roofing, flooring, framing and more.
    Tools of the Trade - A sister publication to JLC, Tools of the Trade (TOTT) strictly focuses on the tools that power construction, renovation and manufacturing operations. Also recognized as a trusted source, TOTT is only published twice per year. However, its online database keeps content available year-round, should you have a specific tool you are researching. Both TOTT and JLC offer in-depth, rigorous tool comparison tests.
    Pro Tool Reviews - Another publication that shares its space in print as well as online, Pro Tool Reviews features reviews and analysis of many popular tools within the fastening industry. Covering all tool segments, Pro Tool Reviews is a great source for tool information - from manual hand tools to power fastening devices. They are also known for their annual innovation awards, where they recognize the best of the best newly launched tools each year.
    Maybe you are more in-tune with the blogosphere? For those that are tech savvy, there's a plethora of tool blogs to choose from - including our own of course! While we have a laundry list of great choices to recommend, we have selected three that frequently review and reference nail guns, staple guns, screw guns, air compressors and other tools pertinent to fastening. A few of our top picks, be sure to check out Tool Skool, Tool Box Buzz and HomeFixated. All three of these online resources are run by industry experts - so you can rest assured you are getting an accurate and educated representation of the tools you need. With project ideas, tool reviews and much more available - be sure to take some time to see what the bloggers have to say about your tool too.
    Nail Gun Network Logo
    Looking for expert knowledge specific to nailers, staplers and screw fastening systems? You can find new tool releases, how-to projects, tool demos, buyer's guides and more - right here on Nail Gun Depot's very own Nail Gun Network. We combine the best tool and fastener information available - announcing up-to-date facts and features on new product-lines, right as they launch. Whether you are looking for a new project to tackle, tips on getting the most out of your tools, or simply want to stay current on tool and fastener news - we've got it all.
    Have an idea or suggestion for the Nail Gun Network? Let us know at Sales@NailGunDepot.com.
    Your Nailer News Experts,
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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  • The Nail Gun Buyer's Guide

    If you've come to the Nail Gun Depot, chances are you know what a nail gun is, what it does, and how it is used. Nailers come in a variety of shapes and sizes, designed to fulfill tasks that range from framing to finishing to flooring - depending on the user's needs. With a variety of options available, which tool is right for you? Find out the features you need, to take on the projects you want to build, right here.

     

    Let's start by covering the types of nail guns or nailers you might encounter:

    From top-to-bottom, the largest of the nail gun family is the framing nailer. Framing nailers are built to tackle large jobs that require heavy duty fasteners (nails) - such as framing, fencing and pallet building. The industries that benefit most from this type of tool include home-building, construction and manufacturing. Similar to the framing nailer, roofing nailers are almost identical in appearance, however these nail guns are designed specifically to fastening roofing shingles.

    For projects that are a bit less intense, finish nailers are recommended for jobs such as door and window trim, paneling, baseboard, casing, crown molding, furniture, shelving and cabinetry. A close relative to finish nail guns, brad nailers drive an even smaller - brad - nail, and are designed for small trim work and furniture repair. Typically, using a brad nail gun will prevent the need for wood putty to cover up a hole where the fastener has been driven - but these nailers can only be used on lighter-duty projects, since the fastener is not as large as a finish nail. Last but not least, a pin nailer might be your best option for crafting or small trim projects, such as cabinet doors and bird house building. For anyone in renovation or remodeling, having a good finish and brad nailer is key to success.

    Designed specifically for hardwood and laminate floor installation, floor nailers are the last of the commonplace nail guns that most contractors or DIYer's will require. These nailers are built to install a variety of hardwood floor sizes and thicknesses. Typically activated with a mallet, floor nailers are only built for flooring applications. Find Your Nailer Now

     

    Pneumatic or Cordless?

    The age old debate between contractors, do I want a cordless nailer or a pneumatic, air-powered nail gun? Most heavy-duty nail gun users swear by pneumatic tools, as they are generally a bit more reliable and do not require re-charging on the job site. The downside to a pneumatic tool, it requires the use of an air compressor. For workshop woodworkers, using nailers such as finish, brad and pin models, a small compressor such as the Senco PC1010 will be more than capable. For heavy-duty, high-intensity use on a construction site, look to a larger compressor such as the Senco PC0970, as it has a larger tank and is capable of providing enough air-pressure for larger tools - including framing nailers.

    If you choose a cordless nail gun, you will need to keep a battery charger handy to keep your tool running - once the battery wears down. Cordless framing nailers also require a fuel cell to provide the necessary pressure to drive a fastener. The benefit to a cordless tool, you can reach beyond the length of an air hose and can get into tighter, hard to reach areas. You also eliminate the need for an air compressor with a battery-powered nailing tool. This is generally the appeal that makes these types of tools desirable to DIY builders.

     

    Terms to look for when shopping for your next nail gun:

    You'll more than likely encounter some - or all - of the following terms, when comparing nailers.One of the most important features you will want to look for, an adjustable depth of drive lets you select how far you want your nail (or other fastener) driven into the object you are fastening. Another option to look for, directional exhaust plates allow you to select the direct your tool shoots it's exhaust - this feature is particularly beneficial in dusty areas. Last, but not least, you will also want to be sure your nailer has a jam clearing feature - to avoid lost time and/or costly repairs if/when your tool jams.

    Depending on the job your are working on, pay attention to features such as trigger size (if you wear gloves while working), easy adjustment for different nail or fastener sizes, and a rugged exterior design to handle the projects you throw at your nailer.

    Keep an eye out for brands such as Senco, Paslode, Hitachi, Bostitch and MAX, as these manufacturers all have a strong track record for building reliable, long-lasting tools. Also keep an eye out for the length of warranty offered by a manufacturer. Most brands will come with a one-year limited warranty, but certain tools go above and beyond - such as Senco's XP (XtremePro) line of nailers that include a five-year limited warranty, or Bostitch's seven-year limited warranty that is offered on select tools.

     

    Your Leading Source For Nail Gun Knowledge,

    The Team At Nail Gun Depot

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  • What's A Framing Nailer?

    Framing nailers are designed to tackle the obvious - framing - but did you know they can be useful for other applications? Uses can include anything from framing to sheathing, sub-flooring, truss building and decks. If you work in a construction or renovation trade, chances are you have worked with a framing nailer at least once. Let's take a look at how a framing nail gun works, its uses, and different options available on the market today.
     
    Paslode CF325Li
     
    One of the most important woodworking tools on a home-building site, the framing gun will allow you to drive framing nails into support structures without hesitation. These nail guns are designed for heavy-duty use - and can drive a row of fasteners faster than many woodworkers can hammer one framing nail. As with any tool, framing nailer safety is one of the most important practices you should follow. For more information on nail gun safety, check out our previous blog post here.
     
    If you are researching different framing nailers, you will find that there are two primary types available - cordless or pneumatic. Cordless framing nailers are powered by a compressed-air fuel cell, paired with a rechargeable battery, such as the Paslode CF325Li (replaced by Paslode CF325XP). The older, more traditional sibling, a pneumatic framing nail gun (also known as air-powered), generates its energy through an air compressor, such as the Senco FramePro 325XP. Either of these tool variations are perfect for the job site. A cordless framing gun will typically cost more than its pneumatic counterpart, however, you will find that it is much more flexible to use, as it isn't restricted to the length of an air hose. Consider how versatile you need your nailer to be when shopping for a new one.
     
    Senco FramePro 325XP
     
    A typical framing nailer will be available with either a bump-fire or single-shot mechanism, which will allow you to select between how you trigger a nail to be driven. Bump-firing allows you to suppress the nailer's trigger and continuously drive nails as the gun moves across a section of wood. Single-firing, on the other hand, requires you pull the trigger each time you fire a nail. As a safety precaution, almost every new nail gun will require that the nose be pressed against a surface, in order to fire a nail.
     
    Hitachi NV83A4
     
    The magazine is another area of consideration, when shopping for a framing gun. Depending on your line of work, you will want to consider the benefit of a strip nailer versus a coil nailer. Typically, construction workers and builders who work in high-volume fastening environments prefer the coil nailer, such as the Hitachi NV83A4, as it allows for a larger magazine capacity - which increases productivity. A DIYer or light-use builder might prefer the strip nailer, such as the MAX SN883RH2 (replaced by MAX SN883RH3), as it is lighter weight, easier to load, and generally a bit more versatile. The biggest consideration between a strip or coil nail gun is magazine capacity - just be certain you are purchasing the correct nail for your gun.
     
    MAX SN883RH2
     
    If you need some help identifying the right nail for your nailer, use our Fastener Finder tool on Nail Gun Depot.
     
    Helping You "Nail" Your Next Fastening Tool Purchase,
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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  • Max Rebar Tiers Now At Nail Gun Depot

    Nail Gun Depot now offers a full line of MAX rebar tying tools. These rebar tiers are five-times faster than manual tying, and provide consistent tie strength.

    MAX cordless rebar tying tools provide a very simple, convenient, safe way to tie rebar. Eliminate the old fashioned way of tying with your hands! Less than a second per tie! Excellent for commercial buildings, road and bridge construction, foundations, precast plants, bridges, radiant heating tubes, electrical conduits, sandbags, and fastening rebar to pour concrete.

    A full line of rebar tie wire and accessories is also available. All rebar tiers are in-stock and available for fast shipping. Contact customer service at 888-720-7892 or via live chat at Nail Gun Depot.

     
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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