CALL CART ACCOUNT

ITEMS IN CART: 0

$0.00

translate
Tag Archives: nails
  • How To Choose Stainless Steel Fasteners

    Growing in popularity and demand, stainless steel nails, staples and screws are quickly becoming the fastener of choice for premium-quality construction projects. While these fasteners are costlier than those made of other materials - they provide the best protection against rust and other deterioration causing agents. Find out how to select the right grade of stainless steel for your project - here on the Nail Gun Network.
    Stainless Steel Deck Screw
    Before we start, let's take a brief look at stainless steel itself. Stainless steel is composed of high amounts of chromium, the element that provides corrosion resistance and additional strength to stainless. It is chromium that gives the steel its rough, adherent, corrosion resistant surface. Its self-healing properties (if oxygen is present) provide further enhancement. A popular metal for its appearance, stainless steel is now becoming an integral component in quality-construction projects - particularly in coastal regions.
    There are several different grades of stainless steel fastener, however, most contractors will be most familiar with three main classes: 302, 304 and 316. The lower grade option, 302 stainless steel has a greater carbon count, reducing its corrosion resistance. A less expensive form of stainless steel, 302 is softer and more likely to strip. This type of stainless is best used in projects where corrosive agents are less prominent - such as interior projects.
    Stainless Steel Fasteners
    The next major classification, 304 stainless steel is the most widely recognized stainless product available. Known for its balance of nickel and chromium, 304 grade stainless steel is more durable and offers better corrosion resistance than 302 grade. Less expensive than its 316 grade cousin, 304 stainless steel fasteners typically offer the best balance of corrosion resistance, versatility and cost. This grade of stainless steel typically provides an adequate amount of strength and protection in most instances.
    304 Stainless Steel
    An even stronger form of stainless steel, 316 grade stainless is the preferred grade for projects where exposure to high chloride salt is prevalent. Popular in coastal regions, 316 stainless is resistant to chloride corrosion - and is recommended for all seaside applications. The downside to 316 grade stainless, it is costlier than its lower-grade counterparts.
    316 Stainless Steel
    In addition to these three grades, look for 18-8 as a generic grade for stainless steel. The grade of 18-8 can refer to grades ranging from 302-305. Generally, you will not want to go below the rating of 18-8 in terms of stainless steel fasteners.
    Make sure to select the appropriate grade of stainless steel for your project. Depending on the environment of your application, choosing the right grade of stainless steel can determine the long-term quality of your project. To find the appropriate stainless steel fasteners for your tool on Nail Gun Depot, simply search the applicable category of fasteners and choose from items labeled as stainless. Be sure to check back often, as we continue to expand our stainless steel nail, staple and screw product lines.
    Your Guide To Stainless Steel Fasteners,
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
    Read More
  • What Type Of Nail Is Correct For My Application?

    At the end of 2013, we posted about the various components of a nail and offered some in-depth explanations as to the importance of these components. If you missed our previous posts on nail components, here is a quick refresher - with some added knowledge.

     
    Collated nails are offered in a variety of degrees, sizes and types. This article will take you step by step in determining the classification, range, type and finish required for your application. A popular choice, check out Nail Gun Depot's SureFit nails, if you are looking for a high quality fastener at a fraction of the cost. Another popular choice, Senco nails offer a wide variety of fasteners to choose from, with genuine, time-tested durability.
     

    The first step is to determine what collation angle your tool is designed to run. Some degrees include 20 °, 35 °, 28 ° and 15 °. The next step would be to classify what types of collation the tool handles. Collations include plastic, wire and paper - which can be used in place of plastic.

     

    When you have completed the nail classification, you will then determine the tool range. The length and diameter are known as the range. Length is the size of the nail, each tool will have a minimum and maximum length. Note: some nails are sized in pennies (symbol, D). Diameter is the thickness of the shank or wire gauge. The bigger the number, the thicker the nail.

     

    The type of nail can be broken into three categories; head, point and shank. Head types include duplex, headless, finish, drywall, clipped and full round which is the most common. The type of point determines how the nail will penetrate into your application and the splitting severity. The most common is chisel (diamond) point and the easiest to drive. It is ideal for soft wood applications. Blunt point allows minimal penetration resistance and is commonly used in pallet construction. Flat point, also known as chisel point, requires the most drive power and is frequently used with a screw shank nail.

     

    The nail shank is the part on the nail which does most of the holding. The shank is one of four types: smooth, spiral, ring or screw. Smooth shank nails have exactly that: a smooth appearance and has the least holding power. Spiral shank nails have either a threaded appearance, like a screw, or they can have a helical twist to them. Screw shank nails are used in hardwood applications. Ring shank nails have a series of rings punched into the surface of the shank and offers the most holding power.

     

    The nail finish can be bright, cement coated, electogalvanized, hot dipped galvanized, flash-coated with zinc, hardened steel, stainless steel or aluminum. These different finishes, coatings or material of nails give different levels of protection of resistance to rusting or other special properties to certain applications.

     

    The factors mentioned above such as degree, collation type, nail size and shank diameter can all affect the compatibility of nails with any nail gun. Contact a Nail Gun Depot Customer Service representative to confirm compatibility and determine the best nail for your application. You can also use Nail Gun Depot's Fastener Finder Tool to locate the right nail for your tool.

     
    Here's To Nailing Your Next Project,
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
    Read More
  • Practicing Nail Gun & Power Tool Safety

    You have your nailer, stapler or screw gun; you have the proper accessories to tackle your project – but do you practice safety awareness when using your tools? Most job related accidents can be avoided, if you take the proper measures to ensure safety on the job site.

     

    For a 58 year-old carpenter living in Minnesota, a simple mistake almost cost his life, when he accidentally fired a 3-1/2” galvanized framing nail directly into his heart. While building a deck, the man’s framing nailer slipped out of his hands – and when he caught hold of it, hand still on the trigger, the gun’s nose bumped against his chest and fired directly into his heart. Thankfully, the nail missed his main arteries by millimeters, and he survived the ordeal after surgery, avoiding a lethal scenario. You can read the entire story here.

     

    The nail was a lucky miss, but let’s take a look at how this accident could have been avoided. In this example, a simple error could have completely altered the outcome, if the man had removed his hand from the trigger. Even bump action guns still require a suppressed trigger to fire, a safety feature most manufacturers include on their tools. If you feel as if you are going to loose hold of your nail gun or other tool, always take your hand off the trigger. Worst case, a broken tool is better than a life altering injury.

     

    A factor that helped to save this man’s life – staying calm and avoiding panic. Panic increases blood flow, which can increase bleeding from open wounds. In this example where a heart was pierced, panicking could have further reduced his ability to breath, leading to hyperventilation. Staying calm and contacting emergency medical services immediately will improve chances of survival, in life threatening situations. Treat for shock while help is on its way.

     

    As described in the instance above, nail guns are powerful tools, so let’s make sure you are set up for success, which starts with safe handling:

     

    • Start by knowing your tool and how it functions. Read the owner’s manual and look at warnings listed by the manufacturer.
    • Wear the appropriate safety gear for your job site. Safety glasses should always be worn, regardless of the project. Depending on your line of work, a hardhat, hearing protection, harness or gloves might also be required.
    • ALWAYS keep your tool pointed away from yourself and anyone else, especially when activated. When in doubt, treat your nail gun as you would treat any other firearm.
    • Don’t use a tool that is not functioning properly. Have any broken or damaged tool serviced before trying to use.
    • Do not try to drive fasteners on top of other fasteners. This can lead to misfire or backfire – resulting in injury.

     

    There is no guarantee that injury will not occur when handling your tools – on and off the job site – but practicing safety measures, such as the ones mentioned above, will increase your odds of avoiding injury and staying safe when using your nail gun or other tools.

     

    Stay Safe,

    The Team At Nail Gun Depot

    Read More
  • What Are Scrails - And Why Should I Use Them?

    Have you heard of a scrail? Scrails can be driven using most pneumatic nailers, but offer better holding power than a standard nail. These fasteners are driven at a rate twice as fast as collated screws - and eight times faster than bulk. Available in a variety of collations, heads and coatings, the ease and speed of a scrail increases productivity and saves labor cost. Find out more about scrails on the Nail Gun Network.

    Relatively new to the fastener market, scrails, manufactured by Fasco, are available in 20-22 degree plastic strip, 30 degree plastic strip, 15 degree wire coil and 15 degree (90 degree) plastic coil. Just as you would with a traditional nail, you will need to stay within the range of fastener that your nail gun works with - visit the tool manufacturer's specs for nail length and diameter.

     
    Scrails
    Bulk and collated screws commonly feature a Phillip's or Square drive. Scrails on the other hand, are available with Phillip's, Square, Pozidrive and Torx heads. They are also available in a range of heads including flat, composite, combo trim and more. You can choose between fine, coarse and double threads.
     
    Scrail Heads
    Depending on your application, the coating of the scrail is essential. For subfloor, pallet, crating and manufactured housing, a yellow zinc coating is typically recommended. Colored screws for composite lumber are available in brown, cedar, gray and tan. Hot-dipped galvanized coated scrails are recommended for any pressure treated lumber application. If corrosion resistance is required, scrails are also available in 304 and 316 stainless steel.
     
    Scrail Collation
    Odd to look at, scrails have become a revolutionary new item within the fastener industry. These handy fasteners can save time and money for contractors and DIYer's alike.
     
    Ready to start using scrails? Feel free to contact a customer service specialist at Nail Gun Depot to ensure you are ordering the correct product for your application.
     
    Best Of Luck On Your Next Project,
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
    Read More
  • Nail Components (Pt 2)

    Welcome to the second part of our series on nail components. Last week, we talked about nail types, shank types and point types. If you missed part-one, you can check it out here. In the second half, we are going to look at finish types and the importance of angle.

    While the shape of the nail is pivotal to its use, you also want to pay careful attention to the finish. The finish of a nail can determine whether or not it can be used outside, the type of surface it works with and its durability.

     

    Finish:

    Bright: This finish is used for your basic hardware nail. There is no coating, it is just plain steel. This finish offers no corrosion resistance, meaning it can not be used on any exterior applications where it will be exposed to precipitation.

    Electro-Galvanized: Similar to the bright finish, electro-galvanized nails are coated with zinc via an electrical charge. These provide slightly more corrosion resistance than the bright finish, BUT should still not be used for exterior projects that are exposed to weather.

    Hot-Dipped Galvanized: These nails are dipped in liquid zinc to provide good corrosion resistance. The resulting finish is composed of a clumpy, zinc exterior. These nails can be used for exterior applications.

    Stainless Steel: This finish offers resistance to corrosion for the lifetime of the nail. Stainless is able to be used for exterior projects and works particularly well with wood such as cedar and redwood. It is popular in markets that have a significant amount of moisture in the air.

    Aluminum: This metal offers less durability than stainless, but also boasts a corrosion-free lifespan. It is typically used for applications such as attaching aluminum trims or gutters.

    Copper: Copper, being a more expensive material, is typically only used when fastening to other copper materials. It is used more for appearance than utility.

    Blue Oxidized: This finish is the result of degreasing and heat cleaning, which leaves the nail with a blue coating. This finish is typically used with plaster.

    Vinyl Coating: Vinyl coated nails provide enhanced holding strength and are easier to drive. The downside to vinyl coating is that these nails are not useable for outdoor or exterior projects.

    Cement Coating: The cement (resin) coating is applied to the nail to improve holding strength and can make the nail easier to drive. It should not be used for applications that will be exposed to weather and precipitation, so exercise caution if using for exterior projects.

    Phosphate Coating: The use of a phosphate coating improves holding strength and provides an excellent surface – for use with paint or putty. The phosphate attracts paint and retains it better than most other nail finishes.

     

    Angle:

    The angle of a nail is based on the variation in degree that the nail sits from the vertical (base). The angle of nail required varies from nail gun to nail gun – but typically sits in a range between 15 and 34 degrees – if the nailer is angled. If a nail gun is angled, the manufacturer should list the degree of angle required in the nail gun’s specs.

    From nails to nailers, there are a plethora of choices to select from when choosing the right tools for your project. We hope that this two-part series on nail components will help you in determining which nail works best for your needs.

     

    We always appreciate feedback and comments. Feel free to reach out to us at sales@nailgundepot.com if you have an idea or request for a future blog post – or simply want to offer input on a topic.

     

    Good Luck In Selecting Your Next Nail,

    The Team At Nail Gun Depot

     

    P.S. We will be taking a two-week break from blogging during Christmas and the New Year to observe the holidays and enjoy time with friends and family - Our store will remain open during regular business hours. Keep an eye out for our next post on January 7, 2014.

    Read More
  • Nail Components (Pt 1)

    We've talked a lot about using nail guns, but what about the nails that go in them? We get questions all of the time asking about the components of a nail. The type? The shank? Point and finish?

    What makes each nail different? The average person only knows about one type of nail, the simple flat head design with a smooth shank and blunt diamond point. This is the most common style for nails used in everyday construction, but what about other nail types? Let's take a look at some of the variations in nail design and function - but first, let's go over some basic terms that define the structure of a nail.

    A nail is composed of three parts - the head (top), the shank (body) and the point (tip). Size and length will vary depending on the type of job you are working on - your nail gun will tell you which size nails it will work with. Finally, you have the finish of the nail, which represents the nail's exterior - and can come coated (resin), galvanized (dipped) or untreated.

     

    Now that we know some of the basic terms regarding the structure of a nail, it's time to look at the variations in their structure.

     

    Type:

    Flathead: This is the most common type of head for a nail. Available in different forms such as full (regular), clipped (reduced head size) and off center (head sits to the side of base), this nail's larger head size offers stronger holding capability.

    Brad & Finish Nails: These nails are typically used for finishing work, such as attaching trim and molding. Having a smaller head means these nails do not have the holding strength of their flathead counterpart, but they are able to fit in tighter places and are less noticeable to the naked eye, after installation.

    Duplex: The duplex nail is intended for temporary use, featuring a double head for easy removal. These nails resemble a push-pin, and are designed to work as a placeholder - before a permanent application has been made.

     

    Shank:

    Smooth: The smooth shank is the most common shank that can be found on nails. The easiest to produce, this type of shank also provides the least amount of holding strength.

    Ring: The ring design on a shank provides improved holding strength and can be recognized by the threaded rings that run along the body of the nail. Its appearance resembles a smooth body nail running through a spring.

    Screw: A screw design has a body similar to its screw counterpart, but is driven into wood without the traditional screw head. It features a spiral design that covers about 3/4 of the nail's body.

    Spiral: Similar to the screw, this shank spirals the entire body of the nail.

     

    Point:

    Blunt: This is the most common of nail points. It reduces splitting when being driven, which makes it an asset to anyone using a nailer.

    Long: This point is mostly used in drywall installation, as it has a long, sharp, needle-like tip that can be driven deep.

    Chisel: This type of point is mostly used for heavy duty projects, such as pallet-building and industrial assembly. The chisel tip also helps to avoid splitting.

    Flat: This point does not have a sharp or jagged edge. It features a smooth point.

    Clinch: This point is off center, but is sharp like the chisel. One side of this point is shorter than the other.

     

    Have we sparked your interest? Check back next week for the second half of this two-part series on nail components.

     

    Best Of Luck On Your Next Project,

    The Team At Nail Gun Depot

    Read More
  • New Duplex Nailers And Nails Now Available

    We are excited to introduce two new Jaaco duplex nailers and compatible duplex nails, to Nail Gun Depot. Duplex nailers are becoming harder and harder to find, but are still in high demand for niche applications.
    The first new Jaaco duplex nailer is the NP-9021D, which runs 20 degree round head plastic strip nails. The second, the NPCN-3390D, drives 15 degree wire coil nails. Both duplex nailers are extremely versatile, as they both have the ability to run duplex nails and standard single-headed framing nails. Each tool features a powerful motor and well-balanced design. They are excellent for installing concrete forms, wood blocking, firework displays, temporary wood scaffolding and more.
     
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
    Read More
  • 7 Item(s)

Copyright © 2017 Nail Gun Depot All rights reserved. All trademarks and brands are property of their respective owner