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Tag Archives: pneumatic staple gun
  • Maintaining Pneumatic Tools & Compressors For Cold Weather

    If you live in a region susceptible to winter weather, as most North Americans do, it's crucial that your pneumatic tools and air compressors are properly maintained for the cold. If at all possible, it's best to avoid using pneumatic tools in temperatures below freezing - however, for contractors that depend on their tools for a living, there are measures that can be taken to help protect the integrity and performance of your tools or compressor from the freezing cold. Find out more - right here on the Nail Gun Network.
     
    Cold Weather Tool & Compressor Maintenance
    Let's start with cold weather maintenance tips for an air compressor. As an air compressor runs, moisture builds up in the tank from compression taking place. While it is good practice to make sure the tank is drained after every use (particularly in damp, humid climates), it is especially important in cold or freezing temperatures, as this water moisture can freeze and seize up the entire unit. To drain your compressor, simply release the drain valve, which is typically located on or near the bottom of the tank. Make sure you do this while the tank is under some pressure - then, take care to close the valve or valves until the air stops leaking. NOTE: never twist the valves with pliers.
     
    Other cold weather tips for your compressor, consider using heat lamps to keep the compressor regulator from freezing. You can also put your compressor on a continuous run cycle, if available on the model you own. Need help picking out a compressor? You can visit Nail Gun's Introduction To Air Compressors.
     
    Now that your compressor is running, let's take a look at cold weather maintenance for pneumatic tools. First and foremost, make sure you are lubricating your tool with cold weather tool oil, such as Senco's PC1295 Moisture Shield cold weather air tool oil. Using a cold weather lubricant such as this one, is great preventative maintenance that is easy and inexpensive. You can apply a manufacturer approved cold weather tool oil to the tool itself - and the air line.
     
    Senco PC1295 Cold Weather Pneumatic Tool Oil
    Other cold weather tips for your pneumatic tool, when starting use in freezing temperatures, as the compressor builds up, WITHOUT fasteners in the tool, hook up your pneumatic nailer or stapler to the compressor and fire @ 40 PSI to help warm up the tool before use. NOTE: Make sure the tool has no fasteners in its magazine before/during firing to avoid damaging the tool or work surface and prevent injury.
     
    You can also rotate pneumatic tools - while keeping the idle tools warm. Using pipe insulation that fits over a coupler is another method that helps create a barrier between the tool and cold air. Can't decide which pneumatic tool is right for your application, check out Nail Gun's Construction Tool Index.
     
    Cold Weather Construction
    We can't guarantee all of these tips will work for everyone, but if used appropriately, they might save you some major repair expense and downtime on the job. Tools and compressors that are not maintained or used as the manufacturer specifies are susceptible to damage and destruction - so save yourself time, money, and a major headache, and prepare your equipment for responsible use.
     
    Your Tool Tip Experts,
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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  • How To Get The Most From Your Pneumatic Staple Gun

    Are you learning how to use a pneumatic stapler? Get the most out of your staple gun - find out how right here on the Nail Gun Network, by Nail Gun Depot.
    Let's start with loading the tool. Loading a staple gun can vary from tool to tool; however, the following provides general instruction for loading a typical pneumatic stapler.

    Before you start, it's crucial that you have the proper staples. The type of staple that your tool takes will vary from model to model, and manufacturer to manufacturer. Check your tool's specs or manual if you are confused about the type of staple it takes.You can also search for your tool's staples using the Fastener Finder on NGD.

    Once you have identified the correct staples, you need to load them. Most staple guns come in either a top or bottom loading variation. Medium and heavy wire pneumatic staplers generally load from the top, while most fine wire staplers load from the bottom.

    Before loading, be sure to disconnect the air supply and keep the stapler pointed away from you at all times - as you should for any firing tool.

    For a top loading stapler, pull the magazine follower back until it locks into position. After the follower is locked into position, place the strip of staples over the magazine rail. The staples should move freely, back and forth on the rail. The last step is to unlock the follower and release it - so that it pushes the staples into the nose of the staple gun for firing.

    If you have a bottom load stapler, locate the release first - which is generally found at the rear of magazine. Depress the release and slide the magazine rail away from the nose. Turn the stapler upside down and insert the staples into the channel, towards the nose of the stapler. Make sure the pointed ends of the staples are loaded - so they will fire into your application. After the staples have been loaded, slide the magazine rail back, towards the nose, until it locks into place. Now you are ready to connect your air supply and test fire.

    Staple guns are designed for a variety of applications, from upholstering furniture to decking and siding applications. With more than 200 available options on NGD, we're confident you can find the right stapler to get your project done right.

    Your Source For Staple Gun Knowledge,
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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  • How To Load A Pneumatic Stapler

    Learn how to load your air stapler properly. Loading a pneumatic stapler varies slightly from tool to tool, but the following instructions demonstrate how to load most common models. Learn more on Nail Gun Depot.

    First, you must ensure you have the proper staple - this will determine whether or not the tool can even be used. After identifying the correct staples, you are ready to load them.

    Most staple guns are either top or bottom loading. Medium and heavy wire pneumatic staplers generally load from the top, while most fine wire staplers are bottom load. Before loading, be sure to disconnect the air supply and keep the stapler pointed away from you.
    A top loading stapler is fairly straight forward. Pull the magazine follower back until it locks into position. After the follower is locked into position, place the strip of staples over the magazine rail. The staples should move freely back and forth on the rail. The last step is to unlock the follower and release it so that it pushes the staples into the nose of the staple gun for firing.
    Bottom load staplers operate differently. First, locate the magazine release, generally found at the rear of magazine. Depress its release and slide the magazine rail away from the nose. Turn the stapler upside down and insert the staples into the channel toward the nose of the stapler. After the staples have been loaded, slide the magazine rail back toward the nose until it locks into place.
     
    Now you are ready to connect your air supply and test fire.
     

    The Team At Nail Gun Depot

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