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Tag Archives: pneumatic stapler
  • What Size Air Compressor Do I Need For My Tool?

    If you're using pneumatic tools, there's no avoiding the need for an air compressor. But when it comes to compressors, you'll find they come in a variety of shapes and sizes - so how much compressor do you really need? Use these simple guidelines to determine which air compressor suits your needs best.

    In most scenarios, a portable hand-carry air compressor will provide more than enough power to keep your pneumatic fastening tool up and running. Take this for instance - a small 1HP portable unit (delivering 2.0 CFM – cubic feet of air per minute) allows a large nail gun to operate at about 15 nail drives per minute. That same compressor will run a medium-size finishing nailer at about 30 nail drives per minute, and will run a small brad nailer at over 70 drives per minute. So as you can see, the specs of the tool will ultimately dictate the air compressor's performance.

    Senco PC1131 Workshop

    Each tool takes a “breath” of compressed air, which then provides the driving force necessary to sink each fastener. The larger the pneumatic tool, the more air it requires to operate, which is also known as “air consumption per cycle”.

    PRO TIP: If you divide the air consumption per cycle into the CFM of any given air compressor, you will determine the possible drives per minute. This simple calculation should tell you if the compressor is able to properly power the tool you are intending to use.

    Senco Compressors

    All that's left to do is determine how quickly you're planning to run the tool. A professional construction contractor may need the extra juice to operate one - or more - large tools at a high rate of speed. In this instance, a wheelbarrow compressor (either gasoline or electric depending on preferred power source) will provide the necessary power required. If similar output is required, but the application is in a fixed location (think assembly line), a large stationary compressor may also work.

    For those running one or two smaller air tools, a portable electric compressor should provide more than enough energy - especially if used with an additional expansion (holding) tank of air. If you are running several small to medium-size air tools, you'll want a compressor rated for 4.0+ CFM. If you're looking to run a finish and trim tool (or similar) individually, a 2.0+ CFM compressor should provide ample power.

    For easy reference, we've included this handy chart below, provided by Senco.

    Senco Compressor Chart

    Which compressor will best suit your project?

     

    ~The Team At Nail Gun Depot

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  • How To Maximize Air Compressor Efficiency

    The Nail Gun Network proudly presents the following guest post, originally published on "Zero Sick Days" by RolAir:

    "The key to optimal air compressor efficiency is to maintain the integrity of your entire pneumatic system. This includes the air compressor, fittings, air hose, and tools. An efficient pneumatic system will ensure that you’re getting the air you need, when you need it. An inefficient one will cost you time and money. Follow the steps below to make sure your pneumatic system keeps operating the way it was intended to.

    RolAir Compressors Banner

    1. Use 3/8″ air hose whenever possible. All hoses cause some degree of frictional loss. While 1/4″ air hose is lighter and generally easier to work with, the smaller diameter restricts air flow more than a 3/8″ diameter hose would. If the CFM requirements of the tool(s) being operated is close to the air compressor’s limits, every bit of pressure counts. To ensure you’re getting the maximum amount of pressure to the tool, opt for a larger diameter hose. To get an idea of how air hose diameter affects working pressure, check out this handy Air Flow Calculator.
    2. Use shorter lengths of air hose. The idea here is similar to #1. The farther the air has to travel, the more pressure you lose. We completely understand that situations will arise when you are forced to use long runs of small diameter hose. When that happens, refer to the next step.
    3. Use an auxiliary tank. Adding an auxiliary tank in between two lengths of hose allows the user(s) to maximize distance from the compressor while minimizing frictional loss. For example, if you were to use two 3/8″ x 100′ air hoses, you’d be able to work 200′ from the compressor, but only lose pressure over the length of one 100′ section. The icing on the cake is the fact that the Air Keg can go where the compressor can’t, like on a pitched roof.
    4. Lubricate your pneumatic tools regularly. Just be careful what you put in them. The wrong type of lubricant can cause more harm than good by damaging o-rings and other internal components. The correct type of oil will be labeled as a tool lubricant and will contain special additives to promote long life for pneumatic tools. Of course, the obvious question is “How often?” That depends on the type of tool and how hard it’s being used, but for tools that get used daily, applying 4-5 drops at the start of each shift is a good rule of thumb.
    5. Check the system for leaks. This includes the entire air compressor, all fittings, air hoses and tools. Simply allow the compressor to build to top pressure with the air hose and all other tools and components hooked up. Once the compressor has stopped pumping, watch the tank pressure gauge and listen closely. If the needle stays put, you’ve got a leak-free system. If the needle starts to drop continuously (a slight drop is normal as the air cools) or you hear a hiss of air, you’ve got a leak. Excessive leaks in the system can cause your compressor to run more often than necessary, which leads to premature wear. If you have a difficult time locating the leak, we recommend spraying a soap and water solution on the hose and all fittings. A leak will cause the solution to bubble.

    Rolair on Nail Gun Depot

    Like anything else in the trades, a little bit of planning and preparation up front will pay dividends in the end. If you plan out your pneumatic system prior to each job and add steps 4 and 5 to your preventative maintenance plan, you’ll avoid a few headaches and maximize the lifespan of your equipment. If you feel like your pneumatic system is not performing like it should, give us a call and one of our service reps will help you troubleshoot the issue."

    Give these tips a shot and let us know if you see improved performance!

     

    ~The Team At Nail Gun Depot

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  • The Staple Gun Buying Guide

    Are you shopping for a pneumatic stapler? Maybe you already own one, but want to see what else is out there? If you are researching staple guns, look no further.
     
    As much as we love to talk about nail guns - after all, it's in our name - today, let's take a look at the various staple guns and pneumatic staplers that are available for construction, renovation and manufacturing.
     
    Staples Variety
    Let's start with one of the most commonly referenced segments within the staple gun industry - construction staplers. Available in several variations - depending on the application - you can choose between fine wire, narrow crown, medium crown and wide crown staplers. Fine wire construction staplers are generally used for furniture upholstery, light wood assembly, roof paper and insulation. Using a slightly larger staple, narrow crown staple guns or finish staplers are designed for applications that include: cabinets, casebacks, drawers, sheathing, underlayment, molding and trim. Next in line, medium crown staplers are capable of handling larger, more intense projects including: floor decking, roof sheathing, soft wall sheathing, subflooring, pallet construction, vinyl siding and insulation installation. The last and largest (size) segment of construction stapler, wide crown staple guns are built to handle the toughest of tough applications. These heavy-duty staplers are built for insulation sheathing, wire lathing, housewrap, attaching corrugated to pallets, furniture and cabinet frame assembly, or any other application that requires a wide crown staple. If you are looking for a solid, durable construction stapler, consider the MAX TA238A for smaller finish and trim applications, or the Senco WC150XP for larger projects.
     
    Senco WC150XP
    For less intense projects - primarily those that include upholstering or securing fabric - an upholstery stapler will be your best option. You will find that upholstery staplers commonly overlap with their fine wire construction stapler cousin. If you are strictly planning to use this pneumatic (or electric) tool for attaching upholstery, make sure the tool is specifically designed for upholstering - versus assembly. These staplers are particularly useful for furniture and vehicle upholstery, light wood assembly, dust covers, cabinet backs, felt insulation, roofing felt, molding, bedding and packaging. Our friends at ModHomeEc recommend the Duo-Fast EIC-3118 Electric Stapler (replaced by Fasco-Maestri 7C-16 3/8" Crown Electric Stapler - 63100) for the novice - or a BeA Long Nose Upholstery Stapler for long-term, skilled use. You can read their entire review of Nail Gun Depot here.
     
    Duo-Fast Upholstery Stapler
    For packaging and shipping, carton closing staplers are specifically designed to seal corrugated boxes and packaging materials. These tools are almost always found in warehouses or shipping facilities. For small to medium usage, consider a top carton stapler or plier stapler for package closing. For heavy-duty, high volume use, look to a larger carton closing tool - designed for manufacturing and assembly - such as a bench mounted carton stapler or post bottomer carton stapler. In the Nail Gun Depot shipping department, we are currently using Bostitch's latest cordless top carton closers, the DSW-3519 and DSW-3522.
     
    Bostitch Cordless Carton Closing Stapler
    Hammer staplers, also known as hammer tackers, are most commonly used for carpet, roof paper and housewrap installation. Similar to a hammer, these staplers are actuated each time the user brings the tool into contact with a surface - using a driving force. We recommend a variation of the Duo-Fast hammer tacker (replaced by Powernail HT-750 classic hammer stapler) for carpeting. For roofing or siding, consider a Stinger cap stapler.
     
    Stinger Hammer Cap Stapler
    Interested in flooring staplers? Check out our recent article on Must-Have Flooring Tools.
     
    Powernail Hardwood Floor Stapler
    Branching out from the typical staple gun(s) a builder or remodeler would come in contact with, there are several specialty staple guns available - such as bedding staplers and bar code staplers. Among a class of specialty fastening tools - mainly for manufacturing applications - bedding staplers are used for the production and manufacturing of mattresses and box spring sets. Designed for a different - yet equally important set of applications - bar code staplers (also known as label staplers) are used in construction, pallet/crating, packaging and residential interiors. Designed for stapling bar code tags to lumber, the BeA 380/10-400 is a powerful new addition to Nail Gun Depot's lineup of specialty tools.
     
    BeA Bar Code Stapler
    Need more information about a particular model or type of pneumatic, electric or manual staple gun? Just ask, we're here to help!
     
    Your Staple Gun Source,
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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  • How To Get The Most From Your Pneumatic Staple Gun

    Are you learning how to use a pneumatic stapler? Get the most out of your staple gun - find out how right here on the Nail Gun Network, by Nail Gun Depot.
    Let's start with loading the tool. Loading a staple gun can vary from tool to tool; however, the following provides general instruction for loading a typical pneumatic stapler.

    Before you start, it's crucial that you have the proper staples. The type of staple that your tool takes will vary from model to model, and manufacturer to manufacturer. Check your tool's specs or manual if you are confused about the type of staple it takes.You can also search for your tool's staples using the Fastener Finder on NGD.

    Once you have identified the correct staples, you need to load them. Most staple guns come in either a top or bottom loading variation. Medium and heavy wire pneumatic staplers generally load from the top, while most fine wire staplers load from the bottom.

    Before loading, be sure to disconnect the air supply and keep the stapler pointed away from you at all times - as you should for any firing tool.

    For a top loading stapler, pull the magazine follower back until it locks into position. After the follower is locked into position, place the strip of staples over the magazine rail. The staples should move freely, back and forth on the rail. The last step is to unlock the follower and release it - so that it pushes the staples into the nose of the staple gun for firing.

    If you have a bottom load stapler, locate the release first - which is generally found at the rear of magazine. Depress the release and slide the magazine rail away from the nose. Turn the stapler upside down and insert the staples into the channel, towards the nose of the stapler. Make sure the pointed ends of the staples are loaded - so they will fire into your application. After the staples have been loaded, slide the magazine rail back, towards the nose, until it locks into place. Now you are ready to connect your air supply and test fire.

    Staple guns are designed for a variety of applications, from upholstering furniture to decking and siding applications. With more than 200 available options on NGD, we're confident you can find the right stapler to get your project done right.

    Your Source For Staple Gun Knowledge,
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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  • How To Choose The Right Upholstery Stapler

    Remodeling a chair or piece of furniture? If you work with - or are planning to do upholstery work - you will want to find an upholstery stapler that properly suits your needs. To the novice, you will want to select your staple gun based on its specific application. Upholstery staplers are designed for applications that range from industrial use to amateur fabric work. Finding the right one for you can be easy - if you know what to look for.

    For those just getting into upholstering, you will probably want to select your stapler based on the application you are intending to use it for. First, you will need to measure the material you are working with, to determine the gauge (thickness), crown (width) and leg (length) of the staple necessary for your project. Once you know the gauge of staple needed, you can find the appropriate stapler - you will also see that a variety of brands are available to choose from including Senco, BeA, Duo-Fast, Spotnails, Grex and more.

    Depending on the thickness of material, you will probably choose between a 20 gauge or 22 gauge upholstery stapler. Next you will need to decide whether you want a pneumatic (air-powered) tool or an electric tool. If you do not have an air compressor, an electric tool will bypass the need for one - however, pneumatic upholstery staplers are typically less expensive. One of Nail Gun Depot's most popular items, the Duo-Fast EIC-3118 electric upholstery stapler (replaced by Fasco-Maestri 7C-16 3/8" crown electric stapler) eliminates the need for an air compressor - without sacrificing performance.

    Once you have gained some additional experience, you might want to upgrade to a long nose upholstery stapler. The extended nose on these staple guns allows them to reach into tighter spaces. The BeA 71/16-436LN long nose, pneumatic upholstery stapler, is a top of the line tool that comes recommended by many upholsterers - including the writers at ModHomeEc. You can see their review of Nail Gun Depot's stapler selection here. Long nose upholstery staplers are typically used for more skilled projects, projects that require a higher level of intricacy. If you are sticking to small, simple upholstery work, using a regular nose upholstery stapler should yield the necessary results for your project.

     

    Helping You Fabricate Your Next Project,

    The Team At Nail Gun Depot

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  • Fasco's Pneumatic Fence Stapler

    Nail Gun Depot will now offer Fasco's pneumatic fence stapler, the F46 40-315. This tool saves time by eliminating the need to hammer staples by hand. Durable and powerful, like all Fasco products, it is also balanced and lightweight in design. It also includes a one-year manufacturer’s warranty and a non-slip rubber hand grip - for peace of mind during use. The F46 40-315 is excellent for livestock batten fencing, snow control fencing, light mesh and woven fencing, electrified single wire fencing, coaxial and fiber optic wire installation, and more.
     
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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  • How To Load A Pneumatic Stapler

    Learn how to load your air stapler properly. Loading a pneumatic stapler varies slightly from tool to tool, but the following instructions demonstrate how to load most common models. Learn more on Nail Gun Depot.

    First, you must ensure you have the proper staple - this will determine whether or not the tool can even be used. After identifying the correct staples, you are ready to load them.

    Most staple guns are either top or bottom loading. Medium and heavy wire pneumatic staplers generally load from the top, while most fine wire staplers are bottom load. Before loading, be sure to disconnect the air supply and keep the stapler pointed away from you.
    A top loading stapler is fairly straight forward. Pull the magazine follower back until it locks into position. After the follower is locked into position, place the strip of staples over the magazine rail. The staples should move freely back and forth on the rail. The last step is to unlock the follower and release it so that it pushes the staples into the nose of the staple gun for firing.
    Bottom load staplers operate differently. First, locate the magazine release, generally found at the rear of magazine. Depress its release and slide the magazine rail away from the nose. Turn the stapler upside down and insert the staples into the channel toward the nose of the stapler. After the staples have been loaded, slide the magazine rail back toward the nose until it locks into place.
     
    Now you are ready to connect your air supply and test fire.
     

    The Team At Nail Gun Depot

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