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Tag Archives: Rolair
  • Top 5 Essential Air Compressor Accessories

    Using an air compressor to operate any air-powered nailer, stapler, or other pneumatic tool is common knowledge, but many don't realize it's not simply the air compressor that brings their pneumatic tool(s) to life. Get the most out of any air tool with these top five essential air compressor accessories.

    Senco Air Accessories

    1. Air Hose

     

    Available in 1/4 inch and 3/8 inch inside diameters, the air hose is not only our most common accessory on this list - but also the most crucial. RolAir recommends using a 3/8 inch air hose whenever possible, as it allows for optimal air flow - despite being slightly less nimble versus a comparable 1/4 inch air hose.

    Air hoses come in a variety of lengths and materials. Typically found in 25 foot increments, make sure your air hose is long enough to reach the distance required. For a workshop or garage, 50 feet may suffice - whereas a roofer or framer may require 100+ feet of air hose while on the job.

    When it comes to selecting the best air hose material, it really depends on the type of environment the hose will be used. Options for air hoses include rubber,  polyurethane, or a rubber and polyurethane blend (commonly referred to as a "Hybrid Hose"). Rubber material handles temperature change well, but for more intense use, contractors generally prefer polyurethane air hoses, which also do well in extreme temperatures (warm and cold), but offer added flexibility with less risk of damage. Polyurethane has been found to stand up better to cuts and kinks too. Hybrid air hoses offer added durability, but at a more desirable price point as compared to traditional polyurethane air hoses.

    You can learn more on what type of air hose you need, by clicking here.

     

    2. Oils & Lubricants

     

    Most new air compressors that are not oil-free come with a fresh reservoir of oil, but once that oil has reached the extent of its lifespan, you'll need to make sure the compressor pump is properly lubricated.

    Before you start, make sure your compressor is not an oil-free model. Assuming it requires oil, prior to daily operation, make a habit of checking the air compressor's oil level for the compressor pump and engine (if compressor is gas-powered). Every direct-drive, hand-carry air compressor has a dipstick to check and maintain the proper oil level. RolAir belt-driven air compressors are equipped with a sight gauge to make the task of checking oil levels easier. Always maintain the oil level to read 2/3 full on the sight gauge.

    As a general rule, RolAir recommends changing air compressor oil once a month - though depending on usage this interval may change. If measuring based on hours, 10WT and 30WT compressor oil should be changed every 200-400 hours, while semi-synthetic air compressor oil can go 1,000 to 2,000 hours, and full synthetic compressor oil can run 2,000 to 4,000 hours between changing. Always use oil specified for use with air compressors, ONLY.

     

    3. Air Hose Fittings

     

    Thanks to their size, air hose fittings are probably the easiest air compressor accessory to forget; but while the fittings may be small, their purpose is significant. Depending on your set-up, you'll be able to choose between connectors, couplers, elbows, manifolds, splicers and more. Most of the fittings on Nail Gun Depot are anodized, which means they are resistant to rust and corrosion. Simply learn the proper size fitting for your air tool configuration before shopping.

     

    4. Air Regulators, Filters & Lubricators

     

    The following three air compressor accessories aren't necessarily mandatory, but can improve operation in many ways. Air regulators are pretty straightforward in their purpose - to regulate air flow. Filters help to keep the compressor motor running more efficiently, by removing unwanted moisture and debris from compressed air; however, if filters are allowed to get clogged, they actually lead to adverse results - reducing the compressor's lifespan and performance. The lubricator helps to ensure a long, trouble free service life, lubricating the entire compressed air system and eliminating the need to add oil to each tool individually, in some instances.

     

    5. Air Compressor Expansion Tank

     

    Need more air than your air compressor's built-in storage tank can hold? You'll probably need to invest in an air expansion tank for your compressor. Compressor expansion tanks are available in a variety of shapes and sizes, and are designed to hold a surplus of air - providing added pressure and performance between your compressor and pneumatic tool(s). Try to find an air reserve tank that is certified by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), ensuring compliance with the laws and regulations of the United States.

    rolair compressor at jobsite

    Have a question about what you need for your air tool - air compressor configuration? Send us a message, or check out this Nail Gun Network exclusive video on "How To Connect An Air Compressor Hose."

     

    ~ The Team At Nail Gun Depot

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  • How To Contact Your Tool Manufacturer

    Need to contact your tool's manufacturer? We can help.

    As an authorized sales and service center for Senco, Paslode and Bostitch - among several other leading brands in fastening - we understand that sometimes you still need to go straight to the source, especially for local and regional questions. For the questions we can't answer, here's a list covering most of our major brands - just in case.

    And, of course, you can always contact Nail Gun Depot by phone (1.888.720.7892), email (sales@nailgundepot.com), or live chat.

     

    The Team At Nail Gun Depot

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  • How To Maximize Air Compressor Efficiency

    The Nail Gun Network proudly presents the following guest post, originally published on "Zero Sick Days" by RolAir:

    "The key to optimal air compressor efficiency is to maintain the integrity of your entire pneumatic system. This includes the air compressor, fittings, air hose, and tools. An efficient pneumatic system will ensure that you’re getting the air you need, when you need it. An inefficient one will cost you time and money. Follow the steps below to make sure your pneumatic system keeps operating the way it was intended to.

    RolAir Compressors Banner

    1. Use 3/8″ air hose whenever possible. All hoses cause some degree of frictional loss. While 1/4″ air hose is lighter and generally easier to work with, the smaller diameter restricts air flow more than a 3/8″ diameter hose would. If the CFM requirements of the tool(s) being operated is close to the air compressor’s limits, every bit of pressure counts. To ensure you’re getting the maximum amount of pressure to the tool, opt for a larger diameter hose. To get an idea of how air hose diameter affects working pressure, check out this handy Air Flow Calculator.
    2. Use shorter lengths of air hose. The idea here is similar to #1. The farther the air has to travel, the more pressure you lose. We completely understand that situations will arise when you are forced to use long runs of small diameter hose. When that happens, refer to the next step.
    3. Use an auxiliary tank. Adding an auxiliary tank in between two lengths of hose allows the user(s) to maximize distance from the compressor while minimizing frictional loss. For example, if you were to use two 3/8″ x 100′ air hoses, you’d be able to work 200′ from the compressor, but only lose pressure over the length of one 100′ section. The icing on the cake is the fact that the Air Keg can go where the compressor can’t, like on a pitched roof.
    4. Lubricate your pneumatic tools regularly. Just be careful what you put in them. The wrong type of lubricant can cause more harm than good by damaging o-rings and other internal components. The correct type of oil will be labeled as a tool lubricant and will contain special additives to promote long life for pneumatic tools. Of course, the obvious question is “How often?” That depends on the type of tool and how hard it’s being used, but for tools that get used daily, applying 4-5 drops at the start of each shift is a good rule of thumb.
    5. Check the system for leaks. This includes the entire air compressor, all fittings, air hoses and tools. Simply allow the compressor to build to top pressure with the air hose and all other tools and components hooked up. Once the compressor has stopped pumping, watch the tank pressure gauge and listen closely. If the needle stays put, you’ve got a leak-free system. If the needle starts to drop continuously (a slight drop is normal as the air cools) or you hear a hiss of air, you’ve got a leak. Excessive leaks in the system can cause your compressor to run more often than necessary, which leads to premature wear. If you have a difficult time locating the leak, we recommend spraying a soap and water solution on the hose and all fittings. A leak will cause the solution to bubble.

    Rolair on Nail Gun Depot

    Like anything else in the trades, a little bit of planning and preparation up front will pay dividends in the end. If you plan out your pneumatic system prior to each job and add steps 4 and 5 to your preventative maintenance plan, you’ll avoid a few headaches and maximize the lifespan of your equipment. If you feel like your pneumatic system is not performing like it should, give us a call and one of our service reps will help you troubleshoot the issue."

    Give these tips a shot and let us know if you see improved performance!

     

    ~The Team At Nail Gun Depot

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  • How To Connect An Air Compressor Hose

    In this brief tutorial, we show you how to hook up an air hose with fittings to your air compressor. Perfect for contractors, woodworkers, DIYer's and everyone between. We've featured the RolAir AB5 compressor, RolAir Noodle hose, and Grex pin nailer. For more, visit Nail Gun Depot: http://bit.ly/2aHp3mz.

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  • How To Buy The Right Air Compressor

    Have you found yourself asking, "How much air compressor do I really need?" If so, you've come to the right spot. Many are fooled into buying more - or less - air compressor than their tool(s) require. An easy solution, learn how to buy the right air compressor, by visiting Nail Gun Depot's, Nail Gun Network.
    Bostitch Compressor
    The following are points for consideration as you start your research:
    • Portability: We put portability at the top of our list, because despite performance and technical specs, if you can't take your compressor where it needs to go, it's useless. Think about the types of projects you are looking to do. Will there be room for a larger unit, or is space going to be limited? Will you have to carry the compressor up and down stairs, or will it always stay at ground level? Will you be using the compressor in a fixed work space, or will it move from job to job? A hand-carry air compressor will prove beneficial if you will be moving it up and down stairs, or if you have limited space to work with. Most DIYers will find that a hand-carry compressor will offer plenty of power for their finish nailer or stapler. These compressors are also handy for basic projects around the garage, such as inflating a tire or pumping up a basketball. Wheelbarrow compressors offer a significant increase in power, and are a better choice for heavy-duty use, but sacrifice some of the portability a hand-carry air compressor offers. Fixed compressors are large and powerful, but are not easily moved, and are not ideal outside a workshop or manufacturing facility.
    • Power & Performance: To make sure your compressor is powerful enough to handle the pneumatic tools you plan to hook up to it, check the specs on your tools to see how much air power they require. Most finish and trim nailers, staplers and the like, will require a lower Standard Cubic Feed Per Minute (SCFM) rating, while larger framing nailers and construction staplers typically need a higher SCFM rating to run. If you are planning to run multiple tools at the same time, you'll need a compressor that's designed to handle the additional load. Outside of providing power to your tools, you'll also need to decide whether you want an electric, or gas-powered air compressor. Most hand-carry compressors are only available as electric, but for larger wheelbarrow units and some fixed units, gasoline power is an option. Consider using a gas compressor if you find yourself frequently on the job without an electrical outlet available. Some gas-powered compressors will also offer increased power over their electric counterpart.
    • Pump & Tank Type: Most compressor shoppers will go straight for the motor output - without thinking about two other crucial components - the pump and the tank. The tank size - measured in gallons - determines how frequently the motor must run to keep air in reserve. Almost as crucial as the motor, the pump is responsible for moving air through the compressor. A single-stage compressor pumps air at the same output pressure, while two-stage compressors have multiple cylinders that continually compress air to provide improved tank filling capability. Be sure to note whether your compressor pump is oil-free, or if it requires regular oiling to keep moving parts lubricated. Larger compressors typically require oil lubrication as regular maintenance.
    • Reliability: The last point on our checklist, make sure the compressor you are buying has been built by a contractor-grade manufacturer. The "house-brand" compressor manufacturers come with an appealing price, but are likely to fall apart sooner than expected. In fact, most don't even come with the out-of-box quality that can be found in compressors from brands such as, RolAir, Senco, Bostitch, J-Air and similar. Buyer beware, make sure the compressor you decide on is designed to sustain several years of hard use.

    All things considered, how much air compressor DO YOU really need? The solution ultimately lies in the type of projects you work on, the pneumatic tools you are using, and the flexibility of your typical job site. Despite the size or design of the compressor you choose, keep long-term reliability in mind. Choosing a slightly more expensive, contractor-grade compressor, might pay for itself in the long run.

    RolAir Air Compressors
    Now, you won't have to worry about "blowing" your money on the next air compressor you purchase.
    ~The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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  • Made In America - Going Green With RolAir Compressors

    Rounding out our series on Made In America, let's take a look at a brand that has more than 50 years of experience in the air compressor business - still assembled in the USA today. That's right, we're talking about RolAir compressors, the green, American made machine. Take a look at the history of RolAir, and watch the attached video of RolAir's manufacturing process, on the Nail Gun Network.
    RolAir Compressors
    The following is a brief history, taken directly from RolAir's corporate website:
    "The year was 1959. Our goal was simple: Produce the finest compressors known to mankind. Decades later, the goal remains the same. As a third-generation manufacturer located in the heart of Wisconsin, we've built quite a reputation for providing professional contractors with compressors of the utmost quality and craftsmanship. They appreciate our attention to detail, rugged performance and wide variety of options. But above all, they appreciate that our sole focus is compressors - nothing else.
    If you're looking to partner with a company built on decades of industry knowledge, experience and unparalleled customer service, welcome to RolAir."
    RolAir offers a variety of air compressors for pneumatic tools, such as nail guns, staple guns and other air-powered tools. Choose between hand carry and wheeled air compressors, with gas or electric motors available. Shop wise and make sure you don't "blow" your next air compressor purchase.
    ~The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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  • Introduction To Air Compressors

    Welcome back to a new year of the Nail Gun Network! We hope you had a relaxing holiday break - but alas, it's time to get back to work. Easing into the routine swing, let's start 2015 with a breakdown and categorization of air compressors - so you can find the right compressor to handle your projects.
    Senco Air Compressors
    If you use pneumatic (air-powered) fastening tools, you have to use an air compressor to bring them to life. Air compressors provide power to your pneumatic nail guns, staple guns, paint sprayers, ratchets and other air-driven tools - they can also be used to inflate tires, blow dust or debris, and more. The application(s) you need an air compressor for, will determine the type of compressor you require.
    Senco Compressor Kit
    First, let's take a brief look at how an air compressor works. Air compressors feature a motor, which forces air into a storage tank. Depending on the type of compressor, a user will attach their tool(s) to the compressor via an air hose or hoses. Every time the user fires their pneumatic tool, air in the storage tank is released through the air hose - activating the tool. As the storage tank depletes its air, the motor kicks-in and returns the tank to a designated air pressure. For some compressors, such as MAX's AKHL1250E, an expansion tank is also available.
    MAX Expansion Air Tank
    Smaller projects - with low volume use - can typically get by with a smaller, single-stage compressor. Single-stage compressors feature one-piston motors, which force air into their storage tank for consumption. As the compressor depletes its supply of air, the motor kicks back on to replenish it. These compressors are typically useful for small workshops, residential garages, or DIY applications. Because they are typically smaller in size, they are also useful for renovation and remodeling projects, where space might be limited. Keep in mind, these compressors are not designed to power multiple tools at once - or tools that require a good amount of energy to fire, such as framing nailers. Finish and trim nailers and fine wire staplers are typically intended for this type of compressor.
    Bostitch Trim
    For heavy-duty applications in construction or manufacturing, such as home-building, assembly line work and more, two-stage compressors should be a better fit for use. Two-stage air compressors feature a second piston - providing quicker refill times to the storage tank. The storage tank is also typically larger in size, allowing more air to be stored during use. Two-stage compressors are also designed to power multiple tools at once - improving operation efficiency. The downside to these compressors, they typically weigh more, are more expensive, and make more noise during operation.
    Bostitch Pneumatic Framing
    When shopping for an air compressor, consider the manufacturer required pressure for the tool(s) you are looking to power. Every manufacturer should provide the CFM and PSI required to operate safely. The CFM or Cubic Feet per Minute determines how many tools can be run at once on an air compressor. The PSI or Pounds per Square Inch directs the maximum range of operating pressure with which an air compressor can run properly. Disregarding either of these factors can lead to permanent damage to your tools and/or air compressor - as well as possible injury to the user. When selecting an air compressor, choose a model with a higher CFM rating than the tool or tools you are planning to operate - this will allow for a margin of error.
    Senco PC1010N
    When you start shopping for a compressor, you will also notice the difference in design between certain models. Depending on your application, there are four main designs available for portable air compressors. Generally, the most basic option available, most hot dog shaped compressors have small, cylindrical tanks - this style is generally the easiest to transport, but offers the least power. Models such as the Senco PC1010 exemplify a well-built, popular compressor within this segment. Similar in size, a pancake compressor features an oblong tank that resembles the shape of a tire. Bostitch offers the BTFP02011 pancake compressor (replaced by Bostitch BTFP02012) as part of a 3-tool combo kit for finish and trim. Still capable of being carried by hand, twin-stack compressors feature two tanks (generally one above the other), which allows them to restore maximum air pressure quicker than a single-tank design, such as the hot dog or pancake. A great example of the twin-stack compressor, RolAir offers its FC2002 model - also known as "The Bull" for its rugged nature. One of the heaviest-duty designs for portable compressors, wheelbarrow compressors are too heavy to carry by hand, but feature a single-wheel design with handles - allowing this type of compressor to be rolled from jobsite to jobsite. J-Air is a reliable, popular manufacturer of this style compressor. For fixed workstations that require high-volume use, stationary compressors are also available. There is also a selection of other wheeled compressors available for heavy-duty use, that function similarly to the wheelbarrow design.
    RolAir Bull Compressor
    One final point to consider, determine the source of power that will work best for your compressor. For almost every hot dog, pancake or twin-stack compressor, electric power is your only available option. However, larger compressors, such as wheelbarrow models, generally are available with either the option for gasoline or electric power. Crews in new construction tend to favor gas power, as it can sometimes be hard to find electric on a jobsite. Many gas-powered compressors also feature more powerful motors. Depending on the application - and if electric is easily accessible - you might prefer the emission-free design of electric compressors though.
    J-Air Compressors
    If you work in cold climates, make sure you shop for a compressor with a cold start valve. Many compressors include this feature out of the box, but if not, you could have a hard time starting your air compressor in frigid temperatures. Standard on many new compressors, an oil-free pump design reduces wear and tear maintenance. For high-volume use, check to make sure the compressor includes more than one connection for pneumatic air hoses - to ensure you can run several tools at once. Also, make sure the compressor has the proper cooling systems installed to handle the applications you plan to use it for - this will help to avoid overheating or damage to the compressor motor.
     
    Bostitch 3-Tool Combo Kit
    Last, but not least, consider the manufacturer of your future compressor. There are several reliable brands available, some of which we recommend, including compressors from Senco, RolAir, J-Air, MAX and Bostitch. Be sure to compare each compressor's features prior to making a purchase.
    Blowing Away Your Air Compressor Knowledge,
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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  • Choosing An Air Compressor For Pneumatic Tools

    We've talked a lot about pneumatic tools, such as nailers and staple guns, but what about the compressors that bring these tools to life? The air compressor you use can make or break your business, so it makes sense that you want to use a compressor that is durable, reliable and capable of providing the right amount of air pressure to your tool.

    Air compressors range in price, based on a variety of criteria including size, power and available features. Smaller units, such as Senco's PC1010 portable air compressor, run for $119 on Nail Gun Depot, whereas larger, more powerful units, such as Rol-Air's 7722HK28 nine horsepower compressor, has a price of $1,599 on Nail Gun Depot.

    Senco PC1010

    The first criteria to determine which compressor is right for you - where will it be used? Make sure to choose a compressor with the correct voltage for the space it will be used in. Always operate your electric compressor as close to its source of power as possible. If an extension cord must be used, consider using a heavy duty cord. If electricity is not accessible on the job site, you might find it easier to use a gas powered compressor. Gas powered compressors are generally more powerful as well - which might be useful for heavy duty projects.

    Rol-Air 7722HK28

    Next, you need to determine the appropriate tank size. Contrary to what some believe, tank size does not affect the amount of air delivered, but it does influence how much the motor runs. Planning to use more than one tool at the same time? You will probably want a compressor with a larger tank. The more tools connected, the more air pressure that is being used. If you want to reduce the amount of strain on the motor, consider a larger tank size. However, remember that a larger tank might reduce portability.

    Some models also come with available features, such as multi-tool use with the Bostitch CAP2060P (replaced by Bostitch BTFP02012), trays and attachments for tools and fasteners with the Bostitch CAP1512-OF, or low operating noise with the Bostitch BTFP02011 (replaced by Bostitch BTFP02012).

    Bostitch CAP1512-OF

    Oil-less or lubricated? Most conventional compressors require regular monitoring of oil levels, which can be a burden if you have multiple people using the same compressor, traveling from job to job. Just as a car, if oil is not replenished, the motor will seize. There is an upside to lubricated air compressors though - they are typically more durable and capable of heavy use. If you are an amateur DIYer, you might find the oil-less compressor more suitable to your needs - if it is only intended for occasional use. Oil-less compressors typically work best with lower volume, less intense use - but don't worry, they still can pack a punch.

     

    Buying a reputable brand, such as Senco, Bostitch or Rol-Air can provide additional peace of mind - and generally brands such as these offer a better warranty.

     
    Want more information about air compressors? Let Nail Gun Depot answer all of your questions and find the perfect compressor to meet your needs.
     

    Happy Hunting For Your Next Compressor,

    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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