CALL CART ACCOUNT

ITEMS IN CART: 0

$0.00

translate
Manufacturer Tech Docs
Manufacturer Tech Docs
  • How Screws Are Measured

    Screws come in a variety of types and sizes for an endless number of construction tasks—from woodworking to metal roof installations. But, choose the wrong length or width, and it can split the wood, or affect the soundness of a structure. As with staples, screw measurement is slightly more complicated than that of nails. Here are three essential measurements every tradesperson should know.

    Screw measurement has three main points

    Screw Measurement, In Three Parts

    There are three main screw measurements: gauge, length, and threads per inch (TPI). When shopping for collated screws at Nail Gun Depot, for instance, you’ll find screws labeled like this: Duraspin #8 x 1-1/4" #08X125CBACTS. So, what do the #8 and 1-1/4" mean?

    Screw Gauge

    The first number is screw gauge, which refers to the outside thread diameter. This is also known as “major diameter.” Screws with a major diameter less than 1/4” are typically labeled in sizes #0 to #14. Screws with a 1/4" or larger major diameter are labeled in fractions of an inch.

    For each gauge size, there is a decimal equivalent. Example: #1 = .073”. That number increases by .013” with each increasing size. For the #8 Duraspin screw (shown below), the decimal equivalent is 0.164”. Engineering Toolbox has a handy screw size chart that lists screw gauges and their decimal equivalents.

    Beyond major diameter, screws have other width measurements. The width beneath the threaded part of the screw is known as root diameter or “minor diameter." The measurement of the unthreaded part of the screw (if not fully threaded) is the shank diameter.

    Durasping Screw, Screw #8 x 1-1/4", #2 Square, Round Washer, Type 17 #08X125CBACTS

    Screw Length

    The next important aspect of screw measurement is shaft length. In the Duraspin screw mentioned above, the length is the second detail in its label—1-1/4". Shaft length is the part of the screw that drives into a surface. 

    The length measurement for a countersinking screw is the distance from the top of the head to the tip. This goes for flat-head, bugle-head, trim-head—and any other countersinking screw where the head can be driven beneath a surface.

    For a non-countersinking screw, it's the distance from the bottom of the head to the tip. So for hex-, pan-, button-, round-, and truss-head screws, length is measured from directly under the head to the tip. One exception: an oval-head screw, which can be partially countersunk, is measured from the widest point of the head to the tip.

    Below is an example of two non-countersinking timber screws from Simpson Strong-Tie. The first screw has a washer head with a low profile. The second screw also has a washer head, but a more prominent hex drive. Note where the length is measured on each.

    SDWS Log screw (SDWS221500)vand a SHWH Timber Simpson Strong-Tie Hex screw (SDWH271500G).

    Threads Per Inch (TPI)

    TPI is a measurement of the number of threads in a one-inch section of screw. The TPI measurement occasionally follows the screw gauge with a hyphen. For example, a screw labeled "#10-12" has a #10 gauge with 12 threads per inch. You may have heard the term "thread pitch," which refers to the number of threads per unit of measurement.

    Check out the detailed measurements, below, for the Senco Duraspin 08X125CBACTS washer-head screw. The #8 gauge screw has a major diameter of 0.17" and 8 TPI. The screw is 1-1/4" long, a measurement taken from the bottom of the head to the point.

    Technical information for Senco Duraspin

    If you're shopping for collated screws and need help, contact Customer Service for assistance.


     

    Shop Collated Screws

    Senco Duraspin Collated Screws

    Quik Drive Collated Screws

    Read More
  • How To Find The Correct Air Staples For A Staple Gun

    Why can’t I order staples for my pneumatic stapler by dimension?

    Unlike nails, staples are often sold by series, which doesn't tell you much about size. Furthermore, staples are not "one-size-fits-most," contrary to most categories of collated nails. Staples are instead measured not only by leg length and wire gauge, but also by crown width.

    Pro Tip: If you’re having trouble deciding on a staple gun, see “Choosing A Staple Gun For Your Project.”

    BeA Heavy Wire Stapler

    Crown Size

    The crown is the bridge, otherwise known as the horizontal part of a staple that joins the legs. Crown sizes are typically segmented into wide, medium and narrow designations. This can become tricky, as some manufacturers measure the inside of the crown, while others measure the outside (or exterior) of the crown.

    Staple crown type can vary by application. For example, some staples come with a flat top, while others have a round or "U-shaped" crown. However, we'll take a closer look at the various crown types in a later article.

    Leg Length

    While a staple series is typically determined by gauge and crown (which we'll cover later in this article), leg length can vary significantly - even within the same series of staple. See the different leg lengths for the 7/16” crown staple, for example, below.

    Staple with measurements

    There are a couple rules of thumb with regard to staple length:

    1. Leg length requirements vary by application type, as well as the base material you are driving the staple into. The staple has to be able to fully penetrate and clasp to form a tight bond.

    2. The longer the staple legs, the greater the hold or withdrawal strength.

    Pro Tip: Never try to force a staple into the wrong tool. Not only can this create a jam, but it could break the staple or damage the tool.

    Getting To The Point

    Most staples have chisel points, which taper to a point on both legs. This lets the staple legs drive directly into the base material.

    Another variation is the divergent-point staple, where the tips taper to opposing points. This forces the legs to bend outward in different directions. Divergent point staples are more difficult to pull out, providing greater holding power.

    Wire Gauge

    As with nails, staples are categorized by different wire gauges or thicknesses. Gauge is determined by the wire diameter, a standard set in the early half of the 20th century by American Wire Gauge standards. It might seem counter-intuitive, but the thinner the wire, the higher the gauge number. The smallest gauge staple wire we carry here at Nail Gun Depot is a 23-gauge staple for upholstery applications, while the largest is 9 gauge for wire fence building.

    Generally speaking, the thicker the wire gauge, the more rugged the application. For finer applications, like fastening upholstery to a furniture frame, a thinner gauge staple is preferable.

    What’s In A Staple Series?

    Finally, let’s talk staple series. Is there a rhyme or reason for the different series numbers?

    In short, yes, it’s true that tool manufacturers want you to use their staples -- and they do make proprietary fasteners to drive the point. Most staple series are determined by the staple's crown size (width) and gauge (thickness).

    One way many manufacturers make staple shopping easier, they may designate a particular "series" of staple that is compatible with their tool. Each staple series makes it easier to find the exact staple you need, without having to know all of the dimensions—or how the crown is measured.

    In order to consistently get the right staples for your tool, rely on the staple gun itself. More often than not, staple dimensions are printed on a staple gun's magazine.

    Types of Air Staple

    Finding The Right Fasteners

    To help you find the right series, we’ve created the Fastener Finder tool on Nail Gun Depot. Just choose your stapler brand/model from the drop-down menu, and we'll do the rest.  Even if you’re using an older model of air stapler, we can help identify the correct staples for your tool.

    Have other questions? Contact us here.

     

    ~ The Nail Gun Depot Team

    Read More
  • 10 Tips For Air Tool Safety

    Almost everyone who works in construction has a horror story that involves a power tool. You may have read our January 2014 blog post about a carpenter who accidentally fired a framing nail into his heart. Luckily, he survived the incident, but not without becoming a cautionary tale in Vice magazine.

    According to OSHA, nail gun accidents alone account for tens of thousands of serious injuries each year, and they account for more construction-related injuries than any other power tool. And those are only the reported ones.

    Just because you’re working on a weekend project, or using a lightweight power tool, doesn’t reduce the risk for injury.

    Nail Gun Safety

    Before You Pull the Trigger

    What are the best ways to prevent air tool accidents? Job one is to READ THE INSTRUCTIONS. In fact, you should do so before even firing the tool, which we admit is hard to do when a brand new air gun is burning a hole in your tool bag.

    You’ll notice the larger part of a tool’s manual is comprised of warnings; exclamation points in rounded triangles, circles with diagonal slashes through them and occasionally curious illustrations. You’ll see “no horseplay” a lot in user manuals. The warnings are easy to gloss over, but heed them. A power tool mishap can simply ruin your day, or it can shorten your career. Before becoming a statistic, familiarize yourself with the following safety tips.

    Senco Safety

    10 safety tips to follow when using an air tool:

    1. Read the manual.
    2. Wear protective gear, including safety glasses, shoes, gloves, hard hat, face shield, ear plugs, and whatever else the task requires.
    3. Use the right fasteners for the tool. This can prevent damage to the tool as well as accidents down the line.
    4. Maintain your tool, hoses, and compressor. Occasionally inspect tools for damage, replace worn parts and use air tool oil, if need be. RolAir has some great tips for maintaining an air compressor.
    5. Store tools in a dry place and clear off any debris after using. Moisture, dust and fumes can damage tools. Read our blog on How To Avoid Destroying Your Pneumatic Nailer for more information.
    6. Keep a clean work area to avoid tripping and combustion. NEVER blast away debris from a workspace or from skin using a compressor. It can propel metal particles, fragments or chips. Air driven under the skin can cause an embolism. If you clean an object with a compressor, OSHA has specific regulations for protective gear, chip guarding and air pressure (below 30 PSI).
    7. Always use the correct air pressure required for the tool. Check the user manual for guidelines, or learn more about PSI here.
    8. Opt for Sequential over Contact fire. Reserve rapid bump firing for high-volume, high-speed applications. See our video on safe trigger use. Also, respect the rebound. After driving a fastener, allow the tool to recover before for making contact with the surface again.
    9. Keep your finger OFF the trigger until you’re ready to drive a fastener. Always refrain from pointing a tool at anyone.
    10. Turn your tools off when not in use. That includes air nailers, staple guns, air compressors, etc.

    Construction Safety

    Besides ensuring your tool is in working condition, make sure you are, too. Don’t overreach, and avoid alcohol or other substances that can cloud judgment or impair movement. Want to see more? Our friends at Senco have even more great safety tips for using power tools.

     

    ~ The Nail Gun Depot Team

    Read More
  • Hitachi Power Tools To Become Metabo HPT

    Big news from an age-old brand, as Hitachi Power Tools announced they will transition the iconic "Hitachi" brand name to "Metabo HPT." The branding change is set to begin September 2018, with the launch of the company's new MultiVolt cordless platform. Hitachi anticipates existing product lines will transition no later than early 2019.

    But, what does this mean for Hitachi tool owners?

    Hitachi Power Tools Renames to Metabo HPT in North America

    Here's what we know:

    First, and foremost, Hitachi wants owners to know this transition will have no effect on the quality of their tools and service. Warranties will remain unaffected by the re-branding, so if you recently purchased a new Hitachi tool, rest assured that your warranty will not change.

    Furthermore, build quality remains the same - Metabo HPT tools will share identical parts and engineering technology as current Hitachi tools.

    So, what will change? In Hitachi's official announcement today, the company emphasizes they are simply re-branding their tools with a new name and logo. Users may see minor changes to part numbers, once the transition is complete, but will otherwise enjoy the exact same tools that built Hitachi's reputation for quality and value.

    Hitachi Metabo HPT

    Why change the name? Hitachi Power Tools USA was acquired by an investment firm, which elected to change the company name, as it is no longer affiliated with Hitachi Ltd. While Metabo HPT and Metabo are both owned by the same group of companies, each brand will operate independent of the other.

    What won't change? According to Hitachi, products will retain current brand identity: same color, same models, same warranties and the same battery interchangeability. They will be made by the same people, in the same factories, with the same specifications and focus on innovation that customers have come to expect. All products will continue to be covered and supported by the same industry-leading warranties and service. Hitachi Power Tools products will be interchangeable with Metabo HPT products, and Metabo HPT products will be interchangeable with Hitachi Power Tool products.

    Hitachi Metabo HPT Transition

    What products will transition to Metabo HPT? In the official release from Hitachi, the company states their full line of power tools, fasteners, accessories and outdoor power equipment products for North America will transition to the new Metabo HPT brand name.

    When will the transition take place? While the official announcement released March 12, 2018, the company plans to kick-start the transition in September, with the launch of their MultiVolt cordless platform. For existing Hitachi products, we don't expect to see most models' branding change until December - and into the 2019 calendar year.

    Metabo HPT packaging and signage at point of sale during the transition will feature both names and logos, to clearly communicate the changeover from Hitachi Power Tools.

    As the transition approaches, stay tuned for additional details. Here's a link to Hitachi Power Tools' official news release.

     

    ~ The Nail Gun Depot Team

    Read More
  • How To Load Top vs. Bottom Loading Staple Guns

    For projects in upholstery, woodworking and more - if you're using a staple gun - loading the magazine with staples is the first step, before real work can begin. Depending on the manufacturer and model of your tool, it may require loading staples into the magazine from the top, or the bottom. As always, consult your owner's manual first, for exact step-by-step instruction. However, for most air-powered and electric staple guns, the following tips demonstrate how to load both top and bottom feed staplers.

    One of the easiest ways to identify top, versus bottom loading staple guns, is by determining the type of staple gun.

    Bottom loading magazines can be found on the majority of cordless staple guns, as well as most fine wire and upholstery staplers. On the other hand, top loading staple gun magazines have been in use much longer than bottom load, and are still predominantly found on large-body, medium and heavy wire pneumatic staplers.

    **Pro Tip: If you don’t know whether your staple gun is top or bottom loading, look at the staple exit point on the tool. Then, find the release button. The magazine feed release is usually located on the opposite side of where the staples are fired.

    There’s also a general pattern between staple gauge (thickness), and magazine loading type. In terms of light wire staples, 20 gauge, 22 gauge and other similar thicknesses are typically used with bottom load staple feeds, whereas 16 gauge, 18 gauge and larger wire staples are mostly used with top loading systems.

    When it comes to loading staples, top loading is generally the slower of the two processes. Bottom loading is faster and more convenient in most instances, except when the tool is being used with a mount, such as when used in high-volume production work. During loading, bottom feed systems require the stapler to be turned upside down, which prevents the staples from falling out.

    The differences between top loading and bottom loading staple guns are minimal, but important for problem-free operation. Check out the following step by step images demonstrating how to load both top - and bottom - feed staple gun magazines.

    TOP LOAD: STEP BY STEP DEMONSTRATION

    Hitachi Top Load Stapler

    Hitachi Top Load Stapler

    How To Load Top Load Stapler

    Hitachi Top Load Stapler

    BOTTOM LOAD: STEP BY STEP DEMONSTRATION

    Senco How To Load Bottom Load Stapler

    How to load bottom feed staple gun step 1

    How To Bottom Load Stapler Step 2

    Loading Bottom Load Stapler

    How To Load Bottom Feed Stapler Closing Magazine Feed

    Bottom Load Senco Stapler Upside Down

    Need more? Be sure to consult your owner's manual for exact maintenance and operation procedure before use.

     

    ~ The Nail Gun Depot Team

    Read More
  • How To Maintain Spirit Level Accuracy

    For woodworkers and construction contractors, a spirit level is a constant companion on the job. The integrity of a project hinges on the correctness of the level, but they must be properly cared for to maintain accuracy. To avoid warranty breaches (and the early demise of your measuring tool), test yourself with these tips for spirit level care:

    Stabila Magnetic Spirit Level

    How do I test the accuracy of my level?

    The level-making experts at Stabila have your answer. While it’s common practice to test a level’s accuracy by stacking one on top of another, they don't recommend it. To properly test the accuracy on any spirit level, they advise the following steps:

    Check horizontal accuracy:

    1. Place the level on a horizontal surface; make a mark on the surface at one end of the level.
    2. Take a bubble reading and remember where it is.
    3. Turn the level 180 degrees and place the other end of level at the mark you made earlier.
    4. Read the level.
    5. If the bubble returns to the same place, the level is accurate; if not, it is not accurate.
    6. Repeat again to validate.

    Check vertical (or plumb) accuracy:

    1. Place the level vertically against a wall; make a mark at one end of the level on the wall.
    2. Repeat steps 2 – 6 above, but keep the level vertical instead of horizontal.

    What would cause my level to fall out of warranty?

    Stabila explains that damage caused by the user is typically not covered under manufacturer warranty. If the vials are melted due to excessive heat (when used near welding sites), for example, or if the frame is damaged through use, you'll most likely void the warranty.

    It’s also important to note that when a level’s frame becomes bent, or is no longer perfectly straight, accuracy will be skewed—even if the damage is minimal.

    How do I care for my level?

    Stabila’s spirit levels are coated with an electrostatic enamel finish, so water and a brush are all that’s needed for cleaning. A reinforced aluminum body, as with the Stabila 38648 Type 96M 48" Magnetic Level, is resistant to rust. But it's always good practice to store spirit levels in a secure location away from the elements.

    Stabila Mason Level

    Wood spirit levels need a little extra protection from the elements. If a wood level gets wet, let it completely dry out to help prevent warping, swelling and separation—all leading causes of measuring inaccuracy. It’s also important to note that certain chemicals can eat away at wood levels. So, if you plan to work with cement, for instance, consider upgrading to a mason level, designed specifically for setting brick, block or stone.

     

    ~ The Nail Gun Depot Team

    Read More
  • Video: Introducing The Grabber SuperDrive N7 Screw System

    A game-changer in auto-feed fastening, the Grabber SuperDrive N7 series screw gun kit (SDN740DT) comes complete with the SDN7 screw gun attachment, Rocker 4000 RPM screw gun motor, drywall clip and Phillips bits. The SDN740DT features a smaller head design ideal for tighter spaces, SureLock fine depth control adjustment, durable aircraft aluminum body, and a rounded tip on the attachment that will not damage drywall or wood. The N7 series tool uses a widely accepted tape collation system, holding up to 50 screws per strip. The SuperDrive N7 SDN740DT corded screw system is recommended for drywall, sub floor, sheathing to wood or metal, light or heavy gauge metal, wood to wood, and metal to metal applications.

    SuperDrive SDN7 screw gun attachments are designed with a snap-on coupler, making it easy to attach with select Dewalt, Makita and Rocker corded and cordless drivers. No separate couplers or conversion adapters required - simply snap-on the Grabber SDN7 attachment. Featuring a smaller head design, this SuperDrive attachment uses a widely accepted tape collation, and can hold 50 screws per strip. The SDN7 indexing head is excellent for drywall and sheathing to wood or metal, metal to metal, light or heavy gauge metal, subfloor, and wood to wood applications. Learn how to use the SuperDrive SDN7 screw gun attachment below.

     

    ~ The Nail Gun Depot Team

    Read More
  • New Dewalt 20V MAX Cordless Nailers & Staplers On The Way

    Dewalt is yet again raising the bar in cordless fastening, expanding their already impressive line of 20V MAX cordless nailers and staplers. Like most Dewalt cordless models, customers have a choice between the bare-bones tool, or a full kit with battery, charger and storage bag included. No doubt, Dewalt's new cordless nailers and staplers are certain to shake things up, as they become available for delivery throughout Summer 2017.

    For the floor installer, Dewalt introduces the world’s first battery-powered floor stapler, the DCN682M1. This cordless flooring stapler kit is designed for engineered wood flooring. The Dewalt DCN682M1 trigger-pull cordless flooring stapler can install 3/8” to 5/8” hardwood flooring with ease, all while featuring a tool-free adjustable base, high visibility tongue engagement for fast installation, and no-mar profiling tips to prevent scratching of floor surfaces. The DCN682M1 has a built-in paddle trigger, allowing for easy use in multiple orientations. A tool-free selectable trigger on the Dewalt DCN682 allows the user to switch between sequential and rapid sequential actuation modes without hassle. The full DCN682M1 cordless flooring gun kit includes a DCB204 lithium ion battery, DCB112 charger and bag.

    Dewalt DCN682 Flooring Stapler

    Just want the tool? Take a look at the DCN682B. Dewalt's pair of flooring staplers should be available for delivery by Mid-Summer 2017.

    For finish and trim woodworking, the DCN680D1 18 gauge cordless brad nailer kit may be the ticket. When paired with a Dewalt 2.0Ah 20V lithium ion battery, the Dewalt DCN680D1 can shoot up to 1200 nails between charging cycles. The full kit includes a DCB203 battery pack, DCB112 charger and kit bag. Designed with a micro nose, the Dewalt DCN680D1 provides improved line of sight and nail placement accuracy, as compared to the outgoing Dewalt DC608 brad nailer. Other features on the DCN680D1 include tool-free depth adjustment, tool-free jam release, selectable trigger, low nail lockout to prevent dry firing, and multi-functional LED lights. Consider the Dewalt DCN680D1 for fastening decorative molding, cabinetry, furniture, crown molding and flooring underlayment.

    Dewalt DCN680 Nose Tip

    Don't need the full kit? Consider the DCN680B bare tool. Both models should be available Early Summer 2017.

    Need to install large kitchen crown molding? No problem for the Dewalt DCN650D1 15 gauge cordless angled finish nailer kit. With a Dewalt 2.0Ah lithium ion battery, the DCN650D1 can fire up to 800 nails per charge. This DA angled finish nailer kit comes complete with a DCB203 battery pack, DCB112 charger and kit bag. Featuring an inline magazine for easy use in multiple orientations and tight spaces, other features on the DCN650D1 include a tool-free depth adjustment for precise countersinking of nails, tool-free stall release lever, and multi-functional LED lights - to provide additional work space illumination. This cordless finish gun is excellent for crown molding, baseboards, door and window casings, and hardwood floor installation.

    Dewalt DCN650 LED Work Lights

    As with the two previous models, if you just want the tool, Dewalt also offers the bare DCN650B as well. Look for a Mid-Summer official launch date from Dewalt, on both DCN650 nailers.

    Similar to the DCN682, Dewalt will also offer the DCN681D1, an 18 gauge cordless finish stapler kit. Almost identical to the DCN682, the Dewalt DCN681D1 narrow crown finish stapler runs the same L-Series staples, but eliminates the flooring shoe. The DCN681D1 kit includes a DCB203 20V lithium ion battery, DCB112 charger and kit bag; and is capable of driving up to 1000 staples per battery charge with 2.0Ah battery. The Dewalt DCN681D1 features an integrated tool-free stall release lever, allowing the user to reset its driver blade in case stalling occurs. This Dewalt cordless finish stapler comes with multi-functional LED lights for work space illumination, and low nail lockout to prevent dry firing - and damage to the wood surface. Other features of the DCN681D1 include a tool-free selectable trigger, adjustable belt hook, tool-free depth adjustment, and bottom load magazine for quick removal of jammed fasteners. The Dewalt DCN681D1 is perfect for cabinetry, furniture, paneling and underlayment. For the bare tool, Dewalt has the DCN681B, both models available starting Mid-Summer 2017.

    Dewalt DCN681 Narrow Crown Stapler

    Keep in mind, each Dewalt cordless tool listed above is compatible with any Dewalt 20V MAX lithium ion battery, including the FLEXVOLT system.

    Built with Dewalt’s patented brushless motor, and powered by high-quality lithium ion batteries, Dewalt's new cordless nailers and staplers are ready to run - without the hassle of using an air compressor, hose or fuel cells. From flooring to finish, Dewalt cordless power combines the consistency of air with the freedom of cordless.

     

    ~ The Nail Gun Depot Team

    Read More
  • Video Spotlight: See Senco Composite Fasteners In Action

    The plastic polymer base for Senco composite fasteners allows these nails and staples to do some pretty neat things - things your average metal fastener can't do. These composite fasteners can be sanded, shaped, and cut without damage to router bits, cutting blades or sanding belts. Senco also claims they offer "superior holding power, excellent processing characteristics, and long-term resistance to chemicals, sunlight, and moisture." A major advantage we see at first look, no rust, corrosion or staining with these plastic nails and staples. According to Senco, their composite finish nails hold up to two-times stronger than similar sized steel nails, BUT Senco also notes adhesives will do the heavy lifting after curing. Our take, these fasteners - particularly the composite finish and brad nails - are ideal for holding materials in place while adhesives cure. Even better, the non-metal material can be sanded or cut once the adhesive has completely set; meaning you can either leave them in place without fear of corrosion, or sand them down without damaging your tool. Watch to learn more, or get the full write up here: Senco Introduces Composite Tool & Fastener Line.

    ~ The Nail Gun Depot Team

    Read More
  • How To Maintain An Air Compressor

    It goes without saying that proper maintenance is key to getting the maximum potential out of your air-powered tools and compressor. Developing (and sticking to) a maintenance routine can save not only time, but also money. That's why our friends at RolAir developed the following air compressor maintenance guide, as originally published on their Zero Sick Days blog.

    Keep in mind, RolAir advises that proper safety equipment should always be worn while servicing your air compressor. Do not start, operate or service your machine until you read and fully understand the owner’s manual.

    The following chart specifies routine air compressor maintenance procedure, organized by required service intervals.

    rolair maintenance chart

    CHECK OIL LEVEL: Recommended service interval - daily.

    Prior to daily operation, make a habit of checking the air compressor's oil level for the compressor pump and engine (if compressor is gas-powered). Every direct-drive, hand-carry air compressor has a dipstick to check and maintain the proper oil level. The dipstick also functions as a crankcase vent. NEVER operate a direct-drive unit without the factory-supplied dipstick. RolAir belt-driven air compressors are equipped with a sight gauge to make the task of checking oil levels easier. Always maintain the oil level to read 2/3 full on the sight gauge.

    RolAir Check Oil Site Glass

    DRAIN MOISTURE FROM TANK: Recommended service interval - daily.

    One or more drain valves are installed to allow moisture to be drained on a daily basis from the compressor storage tank(s). Open drains slowly to prevent scale, rust or debris from becoming expelled at a high rate of speed.

    How to open rolair drain valve

    INSPECT AIR FILTERS: Recommended service interval - daily.

    When checking filters, make sure the filter housing is structurally sound and the element is intact and free of dust and debris. If you need to replace the filter, you can obtain the part number from your owner’s manual.

    CHECK FOR UNUSUAL NOISE OR VIBRATION: Recommended service interval - daily.

    While the air compressor is running, listen for any rattling or knocking sounds. It is best to perform this step after checking the belt tension, bolts and condition of vibration pads.

    INSPECT BELT GUARD: Recommended service interval - daily.

    Ensure the belt guard cover is firmly in place and screws are tight. Check for cracks or compromised mounting holes.

    CHECK FOR (AIR OR OIL) LEAKS: Recommended service interval - daily.

    To check for air leaks, isolate the compressor by removing any air hoses and allowing it to fill up to top pressure. When the compressor shuts off or idles down, observe the tank pressure gauge. Keeping in mind that pressure will drop slightly as the internal air temperature decreases; if the needle drops continuously, a leak is present somewhere in the system. If you can’t locate by sound, coat all fittings in a soap and water solution and watch for bubbling.

    To check for oil leaks, watch for pooling oil around the base of the pump and engine (if applicable). Also, if you find yourself having to refill the crankcase frequently, the compressor may be passing an excessive amount of oil. In any case, take the compressor to an authorized service center to diagnose and repair the issue properly.

    CLEAN THE AIR COMPRESSOR'S EXTERIOR: Recommended service interval - weekly, as required.

    Allow the air compressor to cool to room temperature before attempting to clean. Disconnect electric models from the power source. Wipe down exterior surfaces with a damp cloth. Dry thoroughly prior to operation. DO NOT spray or allow water into motorized components.

    CHECK CONDITION OF VIBRATION PADS: Recommended service interval - weekly.

    Ensure all vibration pads are in place, and the air compressor sits in a level position. If vibration pads are worn or missing, refer to your owner’s manual for replacement part numbers.

    TIGHTEN/RE-TORQUE BOLTS: Recommended service interval - weekly.

    Ensure all bolts are tight. With the air compressor at room temperature, re-torque pump bolts according to the specs in the following table:

    RolAir Torque Chart

    CHECK BELT TENSION: Recommended service interval - weekly.

    Use the diagram below to determine how much deflection is acceptable. If you determine that the belt is loose, obtain a replacement belt or Drive Pulley, and make adjustments as needed. To adjust belt tension, follow these steps:

    rolair compressor belt tension diagram

    Electric Compressor

    1. Roll the belt off the pulley and flywheel.
    2. Loosen the bolts that hold the motor to the saddle.
    3. Increase (slightly) the distance between the pump and motor.
    4. Ensure the pulley and flywheel are properly aligned.
    5. Tighten the bolts that hold the motor to the saddle.
    6. Roll the belt onto the pulley and flywheel.
    7. Check tension. If there’s still deflection, repeat steps 1-7 until proper tension is achieved.

     

    Gas Compressor

    1. Loosen the locknuts for engine hold-down bolts; only until the washers below spin freely.
    2. Rotate the 1/2″ adjusting bolt until desired tension is reached.
    3. Re-tighten the locknuts to secure the engine.
    4. Ensure the pulley and flywheel are properly aligned.

    RolAir Gas Compressor Locknut Diagram

    CHECK OPERATION OF SAFETY VALVE: Recommended service interval - monthly.

    Locate safety relief valve (shown below) and perform a visual inspection. Look for any signs of corrosion or physical damage. With air in the system, slowly and carefully pull the ring to actuate the valve. You should hear a loud hiss of escaping air. If you are unable to open the valve, it will likely need to be replaced.

    RolAir Safety Valve

    CHANGE COMPRESSOR OIL: Recommended service interval - monthly.

    RolAir Compressor Oil Lifespan Chart

    CLEAN/CHANGE AIR FILTER: Recommended service interval - monthly.

    Clean air filters using low pressure, compressed air to remove dust and debris. If the filter cannot be cleaned sufficiently, or shows wear, obtain a replacement using the part number in your owner’s manual.

    PERFORM PUMP-UP TIME TEST: Recommended service interval - monthly.

    With the tank gauge at 0 PSI, and air line(s) disconnected, close drain valve(s) and record the amount of time it takes to build tank pressure. Periodically, test your air compressor against this pump-up time, to determine if it is operating correctly. If the time test is considerably off, contact your local service center to evaluate your compressor.

    CHECK OPERATION OF SYSTEM CONTROLS: Recommended service interval - quarterly.

    Keeping the process as simple as possible, run the compressor and force it to cycle a few times, by opening the drain valves slightly. While it’s cycling, watch the tank pressure gauge to make sure the needle is rising and falling as pressure increases and decreases.

    If it’s an electric model, listen for a brief hiss of air from the pressure switch when the motor shuts off. This signifies that any air caught between the check valve and pump has been evacuated, making for a smooth start-up when the motor kicks back in. The motor will start up again when the tank pressure drops to a certain level, depending on model.

    If it’s a gas model, you can expect to hear the engine speed decrease when the compressor has reached its top pressure setting. You’ll also hear air being discharged from the pilot valve. When the tank pressure reaches the lower setting, the pilot valve will activate the throttle control, which increases the engine RPM and starts the cycle over again.

    With these tips, and a good understanding of your air compressor, you should be ready for the long-haul.

     

    ~ The Nail Gun Depot Team

    Read More

Items 1 to 10 of 32 total

  1. PREVIOUS
  2. Page
  3. 1
  4. 2
  5. 3
  6. 4
  7. of 4
Copyright © 2019 Nail Gun Depot All rights reserved. All trademarks and brands are property of their respective owner | Privacy Policy