• Nail Components (Pt 1)

    We've talked a lot about using nail guns, but what about the nails that go in them? We get questions all of the time asking about the components of a nail. The type? The shank? Point and finish?

    What makes each nail different? The average person only knows about one type of nail, the simple flat head design with a smooth shank and blunt diamond point. This is the most common style for nails used in everyday construction, but what about other nail types? Let's take a look at some of the variations in nail design and function - but first, let's go over some basic terms that define the structure of a nail.

    A nail is composed of three parts - the head (top), the shank (body) and the point (tip). Size and length will vary depending on the type of job you are working on - your nail gun will tell you which size nails it will work with. Finally, you have the finish of the nail, which represents the nail's exterior - and can come coated (resin), galvanized (dipped) or untreated.


    Now that we know some of the basic terms regarding the structure of a nail, it's time to look at the variations in their structure.



    Flathead: This is the most common type of head for a nail. Available in different forms such as full (regular), clipped (reduced head size) and off center (head sits to the side of base), this nail's larger head size offers stronger holding capability.

    Brad & Finish Nails: These nails are typically used for finishing work, such as attaching trim and molding. Having a smaller head means these nails do not have the holding strength of their flathead counterpart, but they are able to fit in tighter places and are less noticeable to the naked eye, after installation.

    Duplex: The duplex nail is intended for temporary use, featuring a double head for easy removal. These nails resemble a push-pin, and are designed to work as a placeholder - before a permanent application has been made.



    Smooth: The smooth shank is the most common shank that can be found on nails. The easiest to produce, this type of shank also provides the least amount of holding strength.

    Ring: The ring design on a shank provides improved holding strength and can be recognized by the threaded rings that run along the body of the nail. Its appearance resembles a smooth body nail running through a spring.

    Screw: A screw design has a body similar to its screw counterpart, but is driven into wood without the traditional screw head. It features a spiral design that covers about 3/4 of the nail's body.

    Spiral: Similar to the screw, this shank spirals the entire body of the nail.



    Blunt: This is the most common of nail points. It reduces splitting when being driven, which makes it an asset to anyone using a nailer.

    Long: This point is mostly used in drywall installation, as it has a long, sharp, needle-like tip that can be driven deep.

    Chisel: This type of point is mostly used for heavy duty projects, such as pallet-building and industrial assembly. The chisel tip also helps to avoid splitting.

    Flat: This point does not have a sharp or jagged edge. It features a smooth point.

    Clinch: This point is off center, but is sharp like the chisel. One side of this point is shorter than the other.


    Have we sparked your interest? Check back next week for the second half of this two-part series on nail components.


    Best Of Luck On Your Next Project,

    The Team At Nail Gun Depot

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  • Getting Ready For The Holidays

    The holiday season is now in full-swing, so what are you doing to make merry this year? Depending on where you live, it's probably too cold to work outdoors (unless absolutely necessary) - which means it's the perfect time to get projects done around the house, in preparation for visiting friends and family. You might not have time to renovate the entire bathroom or put in a new kitchen, but consider these simple weekend projects that can spruce up your home - and even add value.

    Add a chair rail in the dining room:

    The dining room is one of the busiest rooms in many households during the holidays. Between family dinners and holiday parties, it's certain to see a lot of traffic from your guests.

    Installing a chair rail can serve more than one purpose in your home - it not only adds detail to the room, it also helps to protect your walls from scrapes and scratches. Using a Finish Nail Gun, such as the Paslode IM250A-Li, can help you complete this project with ease. Depending on the size of your dining room, installation can be completed in a relatively short amount of time, leaving your room with an added detail that improves its form and function.

    Tip: Make sure the rail is level before attaching. This is a simple step that is often overlooked, but can save time and money in the long run. If your home has crown molding, try to match the color and style of the rail for continuity.

    Redecorate with reupholstered furniture:

    Whether you're sick of that beat up coffee table, or just need more pizazz in your home, creating an upholstered ottoman, from a salvaged pallet, is an easy weekend project. It's a little bit carpentry and a little bit upholstery. The biggest benefit in creating your own upholstered coffee table (or dog lounger) is that it's custom - you choose the fabric and the details. Inspiration can come from a photo. It can be as simple as that.

    For step by step instruction, Shelly Leer of ModHomeEc (soon to be Home Room) breaks it down from start to finish in her guest post: "How To Build & Upholster Your Own Salvage Pallet Ottoman". Be sure to pay careful attention to the way she uses her BeA 71/16-436LN long nose upholstery stapler.

    Build a new mantel for the fireplace:

    This might be a bit harder for the average DIYer, but can add tons of character to your home if completed properly. If you don't have a fireplace, you can improvise by building shelving to display decorations and other knickknacks.

    Design the mantel to fit your style and character - there are a lot of sites online that can fuel your inspiration. Once you have selected the perfect design for your home, plan to invest at least five to ten hours (or more) into this project.

    A Finish Nailer, such as the Bostitch N62FNK-2 will most likely be your tool of choice when assembling the big parts - although you might also consider a Pin Nailer, such as the Grex P650L 23ga. Pinner, if attaching smaller, more intricate details - such as trim.

    Tip: Some people prefer to paint their mantel rather than stain it; keep this in mind as you visualize what the finished project will look like. Depending on the design you choose, you might have to paint or stain the materials prior to assembling.

    Good Luck & Happy Holidays,
    The Team at Nail Gun Depot

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  • Nail Gun Basics

    Don't let using a nailer or nail gun be an intimidating experience... learn the basics right here on Nail Gun Depot!

    Step 1: Choose a Nail Gun

    • What type of project are you working on? Will you need a framing nail gun, brad nail gun (for light trim and molding, this gun shoots smaller nails that won’t split the wood and are less visible), trim nail gun (these nails are slightly thicker than brad nails), flooring nail gun, roofing nail gun or concrete nail gun? Choose the nail gun that is best for you. For most at home projects, such as decking and framing, you would want to choose a framing nail gun.
    • Strip or coil? This refers to the way the nails are collated. Strip nails come in a strip, coil nails in a coil. Coil nail guns allow for less reloading, as they hold more nails.  If you are doing a big job or are a professional, this is the way to go. Most DIYers choose a strip nail gun.

    Step 2:  Choose a Nail

    • Clipped head or full head? Clipped head nails are just what they sound like, part of the head has been clipped off. This allows the nails to be collated closer together, which means more nails in the strip and less reloading. The holding power does not differ much, however some coastal states still require full head nails for certain projects.
    • Galvanized or not? Galvanized nails are coated to resist rust and corrosion, so if you are completing an outdoor project or something that will be exposed to moisture, galvanized is what you want.


    Step 3: How Will You Power Your Nail Gun?

    • Nail guns can be powered by air, electricity, fuel or batteries. When you buy your nail gun you will need to know how it receives power. Most choose an air powered nail gun for its reasonable price point and ample power. However, air powered tools require an air compressor. Your nail gun will be attached to the compressor by a hose. Your compressor will be either gas powered or plug into the wall. You can purchase nailer kits with a compressor at Nail Gun Depot.


    Step 4: Load

    • Load your gun according to the instructions. This is a relatively simple process. The strip nail guns are similar to loading a stapler. Pull back the magazine, insert the nail strip, and release the magazine to allow tension on the nail strip. To load a coil nail gun, open the magazine - inside there will be an adjustable nail tray - set the tray for the length of nail that you are using. Insert the nail coil into the magazine. Toward the nose of the tool, you will find a “feed pawl” which guides the nails into the chamber - so be sure the wire and nail heads are aligned with the proper grooves.


    Step 5: Fire

    • Most nail guns will require the nose to be pressed against a surface to fire. This is a safety feature so that the gun is not accidentally shot. There are usually two choices for operation: bump fire and sequential. Sequential requires you to pull the trigger each time you want to shoot a nail. Bump fire eliminates the trigger and fires each time the nail gun is pressed up against a surface
    Now you are on your way to hassle free nailing!
    Your Source For Nailer Knowledge,
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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  • How To Choose A Nail Gun For Your Project

    You've decided to use a nail gun on your next project, but what type of nailer do you need? Nail guns come in a variety of shapes and sizes depending on the project you need it to complete. To learn what makes each type of nail gun unique, let's look at some of the main ones homeowners use:

    • Framing nail gun - This type of nail gun is used for larger projects such as fencing, deck building, sub-flooring and (of course) framing. These nailers are also excellent for projects involving plaster, as hammering can crack and loosen plaster.
    • Finish nail gun - This nail gun drives either 15 or 16 gauge nails - depending on the finish nailer - and is used for crown molding, baseboards, cabinets, chair rails, wood furniture, decorative trim, millwork, caskets, hardwood flooring, furniture and paneling. Finish nails are sturdy enough to hold these larger pieces, but small enough that they can be puttied over for the finished product.


    • Brad nail gun - A brad nailer drives even smaller, 18 gauge brad nails, versus a finish nailer. Brad nailers are used for smaller trim, as larger nails can split the wood. Using a hammer to drive brad nails can be frustrating due to their ultra-thin pins that can bend easily.

    Hitachi NT50AE2

    Now you need to decide how to power your nail gun:

    • Gas-powered - This nail gun uses a fuel cell with a rechargeable battery. This nailer does not require an air compressor, hose or cord - which makes it convenient. However, this is a more costly way to power your nailer.
    • Air powered or pneumatic - This is the most popular choice for power fastening tools, as it is a cheap, powerful and convenient way to power your nail gun. This nail gun uses compressed air to drive nails. If you choose pneumatic, make sure that the air requirement for the nail gun and the compressor match - ensuring your nail gun will work properly.
    Bostitch Pneumatic Finish Nailer

    Don't forget to consider the brand when making your decision, trusted brands such as Stanley Bostitch, Hitachi, Senco or Paslode will usually lead to less jams and repairs. Nail guns can speed up a job, allow you to drive nails into hard to reach areas, and drive smaller nails without the frustration of bending or breaking. offers a wide selection of nailers, so check us out - and good luck on your next project!

    Nail Your Next Project,
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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  • What's New In Innovation?

    As part of our ongoing mission to supply the construction trades with the latest and greatest innovation in tools, we like to update our loyal customers with important trends and product information. As part of our evergreen, growing inventory of tools and accessories, we are proud to offer the following new products:

    • Meet the Dewalt DCN690B (replaced by Dewalt DCN692B) and the DCN690M1 (replaced by Dewalt DCN692M1), 100 percent battery operated cordless framing nailers - the first of their kind. Revolutionary to the nail gun industry, these tools operate on battery power only. The DCN690M1 uses a powerful Lithium Ion battery to maximize output and increase productivity with its versatile design. As with all of the tools offered on, we offer these nailers at a price significantly below many of our competitors. Check out the specs on these nail guns by clicking the above links.
    • Are you familiar with the Spotnails Crossfire Cap Stapler? If so, then you will love the revised and updated version of this tool, now offered as the Stinger CS150. The CS150, much like the previous Crossfire model, can handle 7/8” and 1-1/4” staples, but can now work with up to 1-1/2” staples. It features the same lightweight and durable Crossfire technology, but revised and improved for better service on the job site. The CS150 is perfect for house wrap, roofing felt and foam board. Get yours today at
    • Have you heard? Senco is now offering a five-year limited warranty on ALL of their Xtreme Pro products. Xtreme Pro models can be found by the “XP” notation at the end of the model name. Senco, known for offering well-built, professional grade tools, stands behind their reputable name by offering this industry-leading warranty on XP models. Keep this in mind when looking for your next nailer or stapler, especially if you are looking for long-term value in your tool.

    Have a product or idea that you would like to see on Nail Gun Depot or this blog, contact us at and let us know your thoughts! Check back regularly, as we will update every Tuesday with tips, tools, project ideas and more!

    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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  • How To Clean & Maintain Your Paslode Cordless Nailer

    Many people aren’t aware of how little maintenance is required to keep your Paslode tools in top working condition. Less than twenty minutes, once every six months, that’s all it takes. We’ve compiled the steps for maintaining your cordless tools:

    • Gather Needed Supplies - Grab your lint free rag, tool oil, tool cleaner, and Allen wrench. A lint free rag is important as you don’t want to leave any particles in the tool.
    • Safety First - Remove everything; battery, fuel, and nails.



    • Clean - Grab your tool cleaner. Begin removing dirt and residue from the filter, cylinder head assembly and combustion chamber.
    • Oil - Oil your motor assembly sleeve, seal rings and combustion chamber.
    • Reassemble - Make sure that all screws are tight. Loose screws can result in personal injury or malfunction - for example, a loose nose could cause your nailer to fire multiple nails.
    • Test it - Make sure everything is in working order. It is normal for the tool to release a small amount of smoke. However, if something is malfunctioning, you are going to want to consult the product manual. If you can’t resolve the problem, contact the manufacturer.



    *Don’t forget to check the expiration date on the fuel cells. If your fuel is expired, this could be causing problems.

    *YouTube videos can be a great resource for tool maintenance, if you are doing maintenance for the first time or prefer a visual example.

    A well maintained tool can lead to improved productivity and years of reliable service.


    The Team At Nail Gun Depot

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  • Senco Introduces Two New 23 Gauge Micro Pin Nailers

    The Nail Gun Depot team is excited to announce two new micro pinners from Senco. This new breed of pin nailer is user friendly and loaded with features. A lightweight aluminum housing, hardened driver and metal magazine ensure these new pinners are designed with the professional in mind. The FinishPro FP23SXP and FP23LXP both come equipped with an extended fastener range for great versatility, powerful motor to ensure driving into hardwoods, and narrow nose to allow a clean line of sight for accurate pin placement. 
    The Senco FP23SXP weighs in at 2.5 lbs., with a fastener range of 1/2" to 1-3/8" - while the FP23LXP features a fastener range of 1/2" to 2". Both tools feature a double trigger safety, auto lock out to prevent dry firing, and rear exhaust with embedded muffler. These pin nailers are excellent for light wood assembly, decorative trim work, mirror and picture frame assembly, rattan furniture, glazing strips, window beading and much more.
    Senco's current FinishPro 10 and FinishPro 11 are set to be discontinued as inventory is depleted. Both the FP23SXP and FP23LXP will be available in Fall of 2013.
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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  • Paslode Nailers

    Paslode’s new Li-Ion batteries allow Paslode nailers to run up to 50 percent longer than a typical nailer with a Ni Cad battery. This means it can propel 6,000 additional nails per charge. The CF325-Li Cordless Framing Nailer is lightweight and easy to use, takes less time to charge, and runs longer than its predecessors. This nailer doesn’t need hoses or compressors, easing the burden of getting a job done right your first time around. 


    The Team At Nail Gun Depot

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  • New Duplex Nailers And Nails Now Available

    We are excited to introduce two new Jaaco duplex nailers and compatible duplex nails, to Nail Gun Depot. Duplex nailers are becoming harder and harder to find, but are still in high demand for niche applications.
    The first new Jaaco duplex nailer is the NP-9021D, which runs 20 degree round head plastic strip nails. The second, the NPCN-3390D, drives 15 degree wire coil nails. Both duplex nailers are extremely versatile, as they both have the ability to run duplex nails and standard single-headed framing nails. Each tool features a powerful motor and well-balanced design. They are excellent for installing concrete forms, wood blocking, firework displays, temporary wood scaffolding and more.
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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  • Introducing The Powernail Model 2000

    Nail Gun Depot will now carry Powernail’s new Model 2000 (replaced by Powernail 2000F), the industry's first trigger-pull 20 gauge cleat nailer for hardwood floors!

    The Powernail 2000 (replaced by Powernail 2000F) has a fully adjustable "Flex Foot" that can install hardwood from 5/16” to 9/16” - and every measure of thickness between. The Model 2000 will install engineered products and solids alike, and will even pierce stand-woven bamboo, thanks to its unique drive blade and extra durable 20 gauge PowerCleats. The Powernail 2000 can even install most of today’s click lock systems. 
    Powernail is the first manufacturer to make a nailer that will adapt to a variety of click lock profiles, with a fastener that is strong enough to penetrate MDF cores without folding, bending or curling.

    The Model 2000 uses 1” and 1-¼” 20 gauge L-Cleats, available in five-packs of 1000 count boxes.

    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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