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Projects & Applications
Projects & Applications
  • Easy Tips To Install Shiplap

    If you thought the shiplap trend had sailed, think again. Shiplap has a classic appeal and natural warmth that never truly goes out of style. Those horizontally hung boards instantly bring a rustic, inviting look to interiors.

    Luckily, adding shiplap siding to walls or ceilings is an easy project you can do yourself.

    What Is Shiplap?

    The term “shiplap” most likely gets its name from the manner in which ship hulls were once built, with planks overlapping one another to form a watertight joint.

    FP Supply Shiplap Kitchen

    Shiplap is a type of wood siding with a rabbet joint (or rectangular tongue) on either side of the board. Placed one after another, the rabbets of the boards overlap, creating a snug connection and insulator that keeps out water and weather.  Shiplap can be found on the exterior of homes, old sheds and outbuildings (even floors), but has recently gained notoriety as a popular interior design element for accent walls - and even ceilings.

    Not only is shiplap functional, but it adds nice texture and dimension. The result is a series of horizontal seams that add interest to an otherwise flat, faceless surface.

    Ready to get started installing shiplap?

    FP Supply Shiplap in Progress

    What You’ll Need:

    Safety Glasses: A given for any project using power tools, always have a pair of safety glasses on hand.

    Stud Finder: Attaching the boards securely requires knowing where your studs are located. Identify stud placement before making your first cut.

    Wood Boards: Choose pine, cedar or even plywood for your shiplap wood. You don’t need new boards, as the look of rough, unfinished or reclaimed wood merely adds to its character and texture (some people intentionally weather the wood to give it a rustic appearance). Either way, for a traditional look, you’ll want 8’ long boards, between 5” and 8” wide. If starting from scratch, plan to have a power saw on hand for accurate, easy cuts.

    Shiplap Detail Amerhart

    Nail Gun: There are a few options when it comes to how you're attaching the shiplap to your sub-surface. Some installers prefer to use a lightweight flooring nailer, such as the Powernail 50F, which drives 18-gauge cleat nails. This flooring nailer installs engineered and natural wood planks from 3/8” to 3/4," but is particularly unique thanks to its easily adjustable FLEX Foot, which accommodates different board thicknesses - without the need for adjustment tools. If using a flooring nailer to install shiplap, you'll also want to make sure the tool is lightweight (since gravity will be pulling it in the opposite direction), and is capable of running a wide range of fastener lengths (to accommodate varying board thickness).

    Powernail 50F Side View

    It's also not uncommon for shiplap installers to use either a finish nail gun or a framing nailer. If using pre-manufactured shiplap, consult the board manufacturer for fastener specific requirements.

    Nails: The type of nail you use ultimately depends on the nail gun you're using. If using a tool, such as the Powernail 50F, you'll need to use the respective flooring cleats that fit the tool. If using a 16 gauge finish nailer, the same applies.

    For a room or area that sees a lot of moisture, like a bath (or if you intend to face nail the boards), consider using corrosion-resistant stainless steel nails.

    Air Compressor: If you're using an air-powered nailer, make sure you have a compressor capable of completing the job. Take a look at the CFM (air volume delivery) requirements for your tool of choice, and ensure the air compressor is able to withstand the pressure.

    Pro Tips:

    • If you plan to paint/sand the shiplap, do so before nailing the boards in place.
    • Using a stud finder, locate the studs and mark them on the wall. With the assistance of a level to keep things even, apply the first board starting at the bottom and work upward.
    • The spacing between boards is traditionally 1/8”. To make sure boards are evenly spaced, place a nickel or quarter between the boards as a spacer. 
    • Some people like the look of visible nail heads on shiplap. To avoid visible nail holes, nail boards through the rabbet or tongue.
    • Don’t feel that you have to apply shiplap to an entire wall. You can always select an area to accent, such as a pantry, or highlight a feature, like a fireplace.

    Amerhart Shiplap Color Wall

    Shiplap installation can vary in complexity, depending on the surface it is being adhered to, the angle it is being installed, and other factors such as material composition. Always refer to your board manufacturer for specific instructions on how to install their product properly.

     


     

     

    Shop Nail Guns at Nail Gun Depot

    Flooring Nailers

    Framing Nailers

    Finish Nailers

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  • MAX TwinTier: A New Era in Rebar Tying

    Rebar, or reinforcing bar, is the backbone of concrete work. While concrete is strong in some ways (compression strength), it’s weak in others (tensile strength). In simpler terms, it means concrete can stand to be pushed more than it can to be pulled.

    That’s where steel rebar comes in. Steel has a high tensile strength and is added to concrete structures to give the needed strength to support buildings, roads, retaining walls and the like. Before concrete is poured and set, steelworkers lay the rebar according to specified building and construction codes.

    Rebar comes in a range of coatings and gauges, depending upon application. The rods must be connected by corresponding ties, a tedious yet important process, to keep the rebar from moving while the concrete is poured.

    Max Rebar Tool and Rodbuster at Work

    From Manual to Power Tiers

    To save costs, materials and manpower, it was only a matter of time before a powered rebar tying tool was created. Tying rebar is tough on the body, mainly the wrist, shoulder and back. For a rodman, or rodbuster, repeatedly twisting metal wire can be permanently damaging over the long-term. A NIOSH (National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health) study in 2005 revealed the potential health hazards and suggestions for making a safer work environment. If a worker is tying rebar for more than an hour per day, NIOSH recommends providing a cordless tying tool and a tying tool extension arm.

    Purchasing a cordless rebar tier is truly an investment. Looking for a strong lithium ion battery that holds a decent charge is key, as is a balanced tool that prevents fatigue and potential injury. Before you buy, make sure the tier is not only fast, but makes a strong, secure tie.

    The MAX Effect

    Without a doubt, one of the most familiar names in rebar tying tools is MAX USA Corp. They’ve been perfecting power tools for more than 20 years. MAX created the first battery-powered rebar tying tool, the RB262 (which used a nickel cadmium battery) in 1993. In 1998, power tiers became available to the American market, and the rest was history.

    Progression Max Rebar Tying Tool

    Currently, the cordless MAX RB398 is among the most popular tiers at Nail Gun Depot. Weighing a mere 5 lbs. and delivering more than 2,500 ties per battery charge—that’s 5x faster than manual tying—the RB398 can hold its own. Plus, it eliminates the need to disperse and cut rebar wire, saving on materials waste.

    But just when you thought they were done, MAX once again improves on their already bullet proof design.

    Dual Wire, Dual Savings

    New to the market for 2018, the MAX RB441T TwinTier offers an incredible output of 4,000 ties per battery charge. That’s a 200% increase from the previous models. The TwinTier also creates a highly secure connection thanks to a dual-wire feeding system, which dispenses two 19-gauge wires at once to form a tie. The tie is 50% tighter to boot.

    Max Rebar Tier with Extension Arm

    Like most rebar tiers, the RB441T comes in three tie wire options: regular or annealed steel, the most commonly used; galvanized with a zinc coating, which adds 40 times more corrosion resistance and is used for moist or marine environments; and polyester-coated wire, which is abrasion-resistant and at least 70 times more corrosion-resistant than annealed steel. The tie wire rolls are changed out in about half a second, an improvement compared to previous models.

    Due to the TwinTier’s patent-pending wire bending mechanism, the tie it creates has a 50% shorter height than the projecting “rabbit ears” produced by older cordless models. What does this mean to the concrete construction job overall? It means less concrete is needed to cover the tie, which further saves on materials. Check out this video from MAX, taking a closer look at the new RB441T. Hear what professionals in the field have to say.

    Max RB441T TwinTier

    Not only does the rebar tying tool save on materials and time, but labor. Fewer tiers are required per job, and an ironworker doesn't need the advanced tying skills and speed of years past. The tedious, wrist-twisting work is done for you - no strings attached.

    Need more? Ask one of our skilled customer service specialists about MAX USA rebar tiers and tie wire.

     

    ~ The Nail Gun Depot Team

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  • Paslode HardieNails: No Studs Required

    Will a new siding fastener transform fiber cement siding installation?

    In partnership with Paslode, James Hardie Building Products created HardieNails, a patented 1-1/8” long fastener that attaches siding without the need to hit a stud. The manufacturers have designed a nail that’s shorter but stronger, so it doesn’t need to be driven as deeply.

    So, how does it work?

    HardieNails Studless Siding Fasteners from Paslode and JamesHardie

    Continue reading

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  • Installing Subfloors: Nails vs. Screws

    Can’t decide whether to use nails or screws to install subflooring? Choosing the right subfloor fasteners can make all the difference in the quality and value of your installation. Before making a decision, consider the following key points:

    Which is faster?

    When time is of the essence, nailing is the quickest fastening option when installing subfloor. Regardless of firing mode, an air nailer lets you drive nails within seconds of each other, which saves time compared to using a screw gun. Screws need to be twisted into the subfloor, which takes more time than simply shooting a nail into subfloor material.

    SN902XP_SUB-FLOOR

    However, some screw guns, like the Senco DuraSpin DS440-AC, are auto-fed. A collated strip of screws in this case makes screwing subfloors a little faster, although it’s not as swift as nailing.

    Which is more economical?

    If you’re on a tight budget, nails are the more economical solution. But, not all nails are created equal. Stainless steel nails, for instance, offer a higher quality, but are pricier. Overall, screws tend to be somewhat more expensive, but like nails, some offer better quality for a higher price.

    With that said, it’s imperative you choose a fastener compatible with your subfloor thickness and material. The quality and correct type of subfloor fastener can literally make or break your floor. The better the quality now, the longer your floor will last later – not to mention the sturdier it will be.

    Which has better holding power?

    As far as nails go, ring shank nails are a popular choice for subflooring. A ring shank has extra grip and holding power, compared to other shank types, and creates a tighter subfloor. Although ring shank nails have a good hold, screws have more overall holding power by comparison. With a larger thread gripping a bigger surface area around them, screws hold your subfloor very tightly – allowing no wiggle room for shifting or loosening.

    Paslode TetraGrip Installation

    Several nail manufacturers, such as Senco and Paslode, have released their own proprietary solutions to improve the holding strength of a subfloor nail. Senco's Whisper Grip subfloor fasteners feature lower rings designed to fully engage and grip the joist or studs, while upper rings ensure the nail remains countersunk - even if the joist or studs are missed. Paslode's TetraGRIP Subfloor Fastener takes it a step further, with a barbed thread design that when driven into wood, bonds with the fibers without destroying the wood. Paslode describes it as “rotation without destruction.”

    Which is more durable?

    Consider the heating and cooling of floors during the summer and winter months. Subfloors, like any other material, will expand and contract with temperature. This means that movement, even at a micro level, will occur. The smaller thread on a ring shank, compared to the larger screw thread, doesn’t provide as much grip as the larger one does. This means that the ring shank nail acquires less stress, but can essentially “move with the floor” more so than a screw can.

    By comparison, the screw has much better holding power, and can therefore contribute to an overall tighter subfloor. However, when the subfloor expands and contracts with temperature, or even house movements, the screw can’t move with the shift. This builds stress in the screw, which can cause the screw head to shear off in extreme circumstances. Likewise, if a screw is not driven flush, is over driven, or the wrong size screw is used, the screw head as an increased chance of breaking.

    Which fastener prevents floor squeaks?

    The fastener you choose will certainly play a part in whether your floor squeaks or not. Nails have greater potential for causing squeaking floors, due to their temperature flexibility. Movement between the subfloor and nail (even a ring shank) inevitably causes the two to become loosened over time, which creates floor squeaking – particularly in high-traffic areas.

    Screws, if driven properly, prevent creaking floors. A screw firmly holds the subfloor in place, which ensures a squeak-less floor for years to come.

    Quik Drive Subfloor Installation

    Are there any alternative options?

    Perhaps a happy medium in the subfloor nail versus screw debate, SubLoc Pro Scrail Fasteners offer a hybrid between the traditional nail and screw. Combining the versatility of a nail with the hold strength of a screw, they can be used with most framing nailers – meaning these subfloor fasteners can be driven much faster than screws. Like a screw though, Scrail Fasteners can be adjusted and removed after placement.

    With aggressive threading along the whole shank, Scrails have exceptional holding power, ensuring the subflooring remains tight. Scrails also have a diamond coating, which provides extra grip once installed into the subfloor material. This improved holding strength means floor squeaks are virtually non-existent.

    For any subflooring project, always consult your local fastening schedule, and find out what fastener length is appropriate for your subfloor. Nail Gun Depot offers nails, screws and Scrails, as well as specifications for all of our subfloor fasteners.

     


     

    Shop Nail Gun Depot:

    Fasco Scrails

    SubLoc Pro Scrails

    Senco Whisper Grip Nails

    TetraGRIP Subfloor Fasteners

     

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  • Paslode TetraGRIP Subfloor Fastening System

    One of the most time consuming, irritating, and costly fixes for home construction contractors, squeaky subfloors. The warranty calls are inevitable. By the time you make necessary repairs, costs can run thousands of dollars.

    Introducing the TetraGRIP Subfloor System

    Paslode tackles the problem of nail-related squeaks with the TetraGRIP Subfloor Fastening System, which claims to eliminate the need for adhesive (and other fasteners) altogether. The system features the Paslode PF237C Subfloor Fastening Nailer, which holds 120 specially designed plastic sheet coil nails. The 8-1/4 lb. nail gun operates on 100 to 120 PSI and has a dual-mode trigger, so you can choose between bump and sequential firing.

    Paslode TetraGrip Installation

    The TetraGRIP system is not a new concept, but rather perfects what many others have attempted to do.

    The TetraGRIP Subfloor Fastener—One Dynamic Nail

    At this point, you may wonder what makes the system any different from using a regular screw or nail/screw hybrid?

    The key is its unique nail shank with an integrated barbed-thread design. Paslode calls this their patented helix-shaped design (called a “barbed tetra-helical shank”), which is where the name of the product originates. The thread on TetraGRIP subfloor fasteners runs almost the entire length of the fastener, up to the nail head. It creates a kind of “locking” function as with a screw.

    Paslode TetraGrip Nail

    When driven into wood, the nail creates a bond with the wood fibers, yet without destroying the wood. Paslode describes it as “rotation without destruction.” Ring shank nails may crush the wood fiber when driven; not so with this nail. The TetraGRIP fasteners feature a “TG” insignia, making them easily recognizable.

    Learn more about these unique nails in this video.

    TetraGRIP Subfloor Nails Save Nails, Time & Money

    Performing like a framing nailer, the PF237C drives fasteners up to 3X faster than using screws.  With its impressive holding power, it also eliminates the time needed to apply adhesive -- plus the time and frustration involved when going back to fix squeaks. Eliminate all that and you’ve really made subfloor installation more of a one-step than a three-step process, saving money, time and manpower.

    And as for those squeaks? The system is ICC-ES (International Code Council Evaluation Service) recognized. It was tested by the National Association of Home Builders, where it received the very first “No Nail Squeak Certification.” So whether you live in a brand-new home or an old one, nail-related floor squeaks may truly become history.

    Paslode TetraGrip Subfloor System

    The Paslode PF237C Subfloor Fastening Nailer only works with the TetraGRIP Subfloor Fasteners. The nailer uses a 3/8” air hose, with a 1/4” plug end for air compressor attachment.

    How do you order TetraGRIP? As of 8/2019, TetraGRIP is now available for sale online at Nail Gun Depot. 

     


     

    Shop Nail Gun Depot:

    TetraGRIP PF237C Subfloor Fastening Nailer, 2-3/8"

    TetraGRIP Subfloor Fasteners

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  • STOCKade Fencing Tools Arrive Online

    If installing wire fence is on your to-do list, you know the importance of fast and lightweight tools, not to mention the convenience of being cord-free. While several brands have both 9 and 10.5 gauge agricultural fencing tools, few can compete with the reliability and reputation of STOCKade. Whether you’re a farmer, electrical utility worker, highway fence installer, or metal and mesh fencing contractor, expect to improve productivity and workmanship with these STOCKade products.

    stockade_logo

    The beauty of the STOCKade brand is the impressive output and durability they possess. Back in the late 1990s, the ITW Paslode folks in New Zealand attempted to bring the latest pneumatic tool technology to rural fence making. Since agriculture is the top industry in that region, the market was certainly there.

    By 2009, STOCKade introduced the first power stapler, creating a tool five times faster than the manual hand-hammering process. After a successful launch in New Zealand, they decided to branch out to North America and the UK. Here in America, we needed a pneumatic gun that could drive 2” staples, which meets all highway code requirements. And so was born the ST400 Air-Powered Fencing Stapler, the first of its kind made explicitly for wire fence construction.

    STOCKade st400-pneumatic-fence-post-stapler

    Needless to say, we’re excited to be one of few U.S. distributors to carry them. STOCKade tools are made with lightweight, corrosion-resistant aluminum alloy housing. Tools feature adjustable drive depths, and drive a minimum of 2 staples/second. For farmers, contractors and even utility installation pros, product build and overall quality is unmatched.

    STOCKade staplemate

    Nail Gun Depot has been selling the STOCKade ST400i Cordless Fence Post Stapler, and now also offers the ST400 Pneumatic Fence Post Stapler. Both versions take 9-gauge staples, with the latter driving 3 staples/second, and the slightly heavier 400i driving 2 staples/second.

    PRO TIP: Don't forget, STOCKade cordless staplers require both battery and gas fuel cell to operate. The staples and fuel for the 9-gauge cordless ST400i model come bundled in fuel/staple packs.

    Also new to us is ST315i Cordless Fence Batten Stapler, which takes 10.5-gauge staples. It has an operating temperature between 19.4°F and 120.2°F. Each of the cordless models deliver 3,000 staples per battery charge, though the fuel cell capacity of the ST315i is double (1,000 staples/cell) that of the ST400i.

    STOCKade ST-315i Fence Stapler

    PRO TIP: Since STOCKade lives under the Paslode umbrella of products, you’ll find that fuel cells for the ST315i cordless stapler are interchangeable with the equivalent Paslode orange framing fuel cell.

    A great tool doesn’t do much without a comparable fastener to do the heavy lifting. STOCKade staples are just as brawny, and are made of 240gm pre-galvanized wire, with a Class 3 HDG (hot-dipped galvanized) coating. The tough, rust-resistant coating contains 90% zinc and 10% aluminum [known as a Bezinal coating], which gives greater protection from corrosion than a standard galvanization.

    What is a Class 3 coating, you ask?

    To begin, a Class 1 coating is typically found on standard barbed wire or field fence, and will generally last from 2 to 11 years. Class 3 is about 2-1/2 times thicker, and remains rust-free from 13 to 30 years in non-coastal regions.

    STOCKade st400-barbed-staples

    These paper-collated staples come secured with a weatherproof tape that prevents tool contamination. After each staple gets driven, a patented glue then seals the hole created by the staple further preventing corrosion and deterioration. As timber ages, it dries out and cracks. Divergent tips on staples for the 400-series spread apart when driven into wood, for a more secure connection.

    Now, agricultural and horticultural fence building jobs are that much easier — and that much more dependable. Check out STOCKade fencing products today, or view this quick video introducing STOCKade tools!

     

    ~ The Team at Nail Gun Depot

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  • The Difference Between Siding vs. Framing Nail Guns

    Today, let's take a look at one of our frequently asked questions, "what's the difference between a siding nailer and framing nailer?" When it comes to applications, such as siding or roofing, customers often don't understand why framing guns aren't the best tool for the job. Don't get us wrong, framing nailers are extremely versatile in purpose, and can definitely pull their weight for more than framing [framing nail guns are also great for decking, sheathing, subflooring and more]. And, in appearance, a coil framing nailer and a siding nailer look nearly identical. But, when it comes to siding installation, investing in a siding nailer may be worth the expense - and here's why.

    Construction Framing

    The primary difference between a coil framing nailer and a siding nailer is nail size. Where framing requires much larger nails that penetrate deep and offer greater holding strength, siding does not require nearly as much support. Think of it this way, connecting 2x4 boards to frame a building requires much more holding power versus simply attaching thin planks to a wood base. Typically, you'll see siding nails range anywhere from 1-1/4" up to 2-1/2" in length, whereas framing nails can go 3-1/2" or more.

    PRO TIP: If installing siding for the first time, be sure to research installation tips based on the type of siding you're using. Siding nailers are popular for use with fiber cement and wood siding applications. On the other hand, vinyl siding is typically hung rather than nailed, as it needs to expand and contract.

    Residential Siding Installation

    With some overlap in nail size, you may wonder whether framing nailers can be used for siding? The answer is, yes.

    Framing nail guns can be used for siding installation, if the nail being used is long enough to attach the siding firmly to your exterior wood sheathing. While it's recommended to always use a siding nail gun for siding installation, in a pinch, you may be able to use a framing nailer instead. However, the same cannot be said inversely. Since most applications in framing require longer nails that are specifically intended to join lumber together, more often than not, siding nails will not be enough.

    siding installation

    You may also find that siding nailers are a few pounds lighter than framing guns. The average siding nailer weighs right around 5 LBS., while coil framing nailers typically run 8-9 LBS. minimum. For those installing siding, this makes the siding gun that much more desirable, as it should be less fatiguing to operate.

    As far as cost goes, you're looking at roughly the same price range on either tool. On Nail Gun Depot, you'll find an average range of $250 to $350 for either type of coil nailer. As with anything, build quality, brand preference and product features will all influence each tool's price.

     

    ~ The Nail Gun Depot Team

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  • How To Maintain Spirit Level Accuracy

    For woodworkers and construction contractors, a spirit level is a constant companion on the job. The integrity of a project hinges on the correctness of the level, but they must be properly cared for to maintain accuracy. To avoid warranty breaches (and the early demise of your measuring tool), test yourself with these tips for spirit level care:

    Stabila Magnetic Spirit Level

    How do I test the accuracy of my level?

    The level-making experts at Stabila have your answer. While it’s common practice to test a level’s accuracy by stacking one on top of another, they don't recommend it. To properly test the accuracy on any spirit level, they advise the following steps:

    Check horizontal accuracy:

    1. Place the level on a horizontal surface; make a mark on the surface at one end of the level.
    2. Take a bubble reading and remember where it is.
    3. Turn the level 180 degrees and place the other end of level at the mark you made earlier.
    4. Read the level.
    5. If the bubble returns to the same place, the level is accurate; if not, it is not accurate.
    6. Repeat again to validate.

    Check vertical (or plumb) accuracy:

    1. Place the level vertically against a wall; make a mark at one end of the level on the wall.
    2. Repeat steps 2 – 6 above, but keep the level vertical instead of horizontal.

    What would cause my level to fall out of warranty?

    Stabila explains that damage caused by the user is typically not covered under manufacturer warranty. If the vials are melted due to excessive heat (when used near welding sites), for example, or if the frame is damaged through use, you'll most likely void the warranty.

    It’s also important to note that when a level’s frame becomes bent, or is no longer perfectly straight, accuracy will be skewed—even if the damage is minimal.

    How do I care for my level?

    Stabila’s spirit levels are coated with an electrostatic enamel finish, so water and a brush are all that’s needed for cleaning. A reinforced aluminum body, as with the Stabila 38648 Type 96M 48" Magnetic Level, is resistant to rust. But it's always good practice to store spirit levels in a secure location away from the elements.

    Stabila Mason Level

    Wood spirit levels need a little extra protection from the elements. If a wood level gets wet, let it completely dry out to help prevent warping, swelling and separation—all leading causes of measuring inaccuracy. It’s also important to note that certain chemicals can eat away at wood levels. So, if you plan to work with cement, for instance, consider upgrading to a mason level, designed specifically for setting brick, block or stone.

     

    ~ The Nail Gun Depot Team

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  • First Look: Dewalt DCN890 Cordless Concrete Pinner

    Expanding on an already impressive line of cordless tools, Dewalt, in partnership with Powers Fastening, recently introduced the DCN890 cordless concrete and steel pinner. Among the first battery-only cordless concrete nailers available to contractors, the DCN890 is able to handle an array of projects, including applications in mechanical, electrical, plumbing, drywall, insulation, surface prep and more. Versatile, easily serviceable in the field, and built for contractor-grade performance, here's your first look at the all-new Dewalt DCN890 cordless concrete nailer.

    Dewalt DCN890 Cordless Concrete Nailer

    As with all other Dewalt cordless nailers, the DCN890 is available in two variations - either as a complete kit with (2) DCB205 batteries, DCB115 charger, DCN8904 standard/drywall interchangeable contact trip, and storage case; or as a bare tool only.

    This 20V lithium ion cordless concrete nailer isn't afraid to take on both large and small projects alike, designed to drive concrete pins from 1/2" all the way up to 2-1/4" in length.

    Dewalt DCN890 Applications

    What makes the DCN890 important isn't the fact it's cordless, but rather how it's powered. Removing fuel cells and powder loads from the equation, Dewalt's cordless concrete nailer runs exclusively on 20V MAX lithium ion battery power. Not only is the DCN890 safer to operate thanks to a propellant-free design, it also provides long-term cost efficiency - eliminating recurring expense for powder loads or gas fuel. When used with DCB205 5.0Ah battery, Dewalt indicates this tool is capable of firing up to 600 shots per charging cycle.

    Dewalt DCN890 Steel To Concrete

    Featuring a flywheel based design for internal operation, reset time between shots is minimal, allowing for improved overall performance. Thanks to flywheel operation, Dewalt is also able to offer some of the lowest noise and recoil levels among its competition. And, with a propellant-free design, no licensing is required.

    Dewalt DCN890 Electrical To Concrete

    The other major benefit to Dewalt's new DCN890P2 and DCN890B, among its competition, it is the only cordless concrete nailer with a field-serviceable driver blade. Easy to service on-the-go, Dewalt says the driver can be replaced by a user in under two minutes. Specifically designed to accommodate several different applications in concrete and steel fastening, three adjustable power settings allow the DCN890 to handle projects ranging from hollow block, to hard concrete and steel.

    Dewalt DCN890 Specs

    Other features on this Dewalt battery-powered concrete nailer include a driver stall release lever, brushless motor, tool-free access points to clear jams, and an angled magazine for access in tight areas. Meanwhile, dual built-in LED lights illuminate any work surface, while providing valuable tool diagnostics to the user. And best of all, backed by a 3-Year Dewalt Guaranteed Tough warranty, any lingering concern about quality should be put to bed.

    Dewalt DCN890 Features

    Ready to accessorize? The DCN890 can also be mounted on Dewalt's DCN8905 extension pole, which can be used either as a 3' or 6' extension in hard to reach places. Owners will also have the option to order Stick-E and Magentic Stick-E nosepieces for the cordless concrete and steel pinner. And of course, the DCN890 is also compatible with Dewalt's new FLEXVOLT battery too.

    Dewalt DCN890 Assembly

    Commercial applications for the DCN890 include attaching steel track to concrete, block or steel; attaching mechanical clips and fixing to concrete, block or steel; attaching plywood to concrete or block; attaching lath to concrete, block or steel; or attaching furring strips to concrete or block. Suitable base materials for fastening include normal-weight concrete, lightweight concrete, grouted concrete masonry, hollow concrete masonry, and steel.

    Dewalt DCN890 Lath To Concrete

    Ready to order? Initial reports estimate the DCN890 kit will be available as early as October 2017, while we expect the bare tool to follow shortly after. Launch pricing on Nail Gun Depot is set at $749 for the kit, while the bare tool can be had for just under $600.

    With a growing, industry-wide demand for lithium ion tools, do you see Dewalt's new DCN890P2 and DCN890B revolutionizing the way we nail to concrete and metal? Let us know.

     

    ~ The Nail Gun Depot Team

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  • Everything To Know About Galvanized Nails - And Using Them

    Why use galvanized nails? The quick answer, to slow down the process of rusting and corrosion, by protecting the nail with a zinc coating. Galvanized steel nails will eventually rust (use stainless steel nails to completely prevent rust), but the galvanization (zinc coat) will prolong the nail's lifespan - as compared to non-coated alternatives. Because the cost of stainless steel is often two or three times that of galvanized steel, many contractors elect for the galvanized product in regions where building code doesn't specify otherwise.

    So, you've decided to use a galvanized nail, but now need to determine which type of galvanized coating to use.

    There are two main types of galvanized nail that you'll find on Nail Gun Depot, either Hot-Dip Galvanized (HDG), or Electro-Galvanized (EG). Other types of galvanization can include tumbler hot galvanizing and mechanical zinc plating (also known as peen-plating). You may also see certain galvanized products listed as 1000 hours galvanized, which indicates those items are rated to withstand 1000 hours - or more - of salt spray testing.

    Hot Dipped Galvanized nails are the highest quality of galvanization available, offering 1.7 mils minimum zinc coating thickness, evenly covering all nail surfaces from head to tip - and offering a 30-50+ year lifespan. The process for hot-dip galvanizing includes cleaning the steel body, submerging the nail into molten zinc, and spinning it to remove excess coating. Perfect for use indoor and outdoor, HDG nails provide a good balance of cost and quality. And, an added benefit, the coarse zinc particles offer added "cling" to whatever surface they come in contact with - providing additional holding strength.

    For the highest quality galvanized nail, look to see if it is ACQ approved, which indicates the nail can be used with ACQ pressure treated lumber. For HDG nails, ensure the nail meets ASTM A153 specifications for hot dipped galvanizing.

    For applications where lower quality galvanization is suitable, Electro-Galvanized nails are among the thinnest coating, at 0.36 mils maximum. Ideal for indoor applications, the EG coating has an average lifespan of 5-10+ years depending on the environment. Similar to HDG, Electro-Galvanized nails are also bathed in zinc, but with an electric current that charges the zinc acid and attaches it to the nail's body.

    Despite the benefits to using a galvanized nail, there are certain types of wood, such as cedar or redwood, where galvanized nails (especially those with a lower quality galvanization) will quickly rust and streak the surface, due to a chemical reaction with the wood. We typically recommend using stainless steel nails if working with these types of wood, for a guaranteed high-quality finish.

    When ordering, if you're looking specifically for Hot Dipped Galvanized nails, pay close attention to the product description. More often than not, if a nail is labelled as galvanized, but does not specifically indicate Hot-Dip Galvanized (HDG) anywhere, the nail is probably coated with a lesser quality galvanization, such as Electro-Galvanized (EG).

    Most nails offered through Nail Gun Depot are listed specifically by the type of material, coating, or galvanization they are manufactured with. For additional questions regarding which type of nail or staple is best for your project, consult a product specialist here. You can also learn more by visiting the American Galvanizers Association.

    Of course, always know the building codes and requirements for the area with which you are planning to work.

     

    ~ The Team At Nail Gun Depot

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