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  • Fasten-Ating Facts: Understanding Nail Shank Types

    Often a make-or-break factor in roofing, pallet assembly or framing projects, nail shank type plays a critical role in U.S. building code. Using the wrong shank can leave you with a damaged roof, squeaky subfloor, or worse. The following are the most common gun nail shank types found in construction. Learn which is best for your job—and why.

    Choose from various nail shanks for construction applications

    Smooth Shank Nails

    Let’s start with the most common nail shank type. Smooth shank nails have no threading and are the easiest to drive. This also makes them the fastest type of nail to drive. Depending on strength and makeup, they can be driven into nearly any surface, and are suitable for a wide range of everyday construction applications—from framing to finishing.

    Pro Tip: Consult with building codes and material manufacturer guidelines before starting a project, to determine if you need to use a certain kind of nail or other fastener. You can also check with the International Code Council (ICC) construction-related specifications. 

    As you might imagine, smooth nails are the easiest shank type to produce, and thus, among the most affordable. What smooth shank nails offer in versatility, however, they lack in optimal holding ability. So you wouldn’t use them for jobs like roofing, where greater pull-through or withdrawal resistance is needed.

    Applications: Framing, Siding, Trim and Finishing, General Woodworking

    From Simpson Strong-Tie, a Smooth Nail Shank

    Ring Shank Nails

    Ring shank nails have annular (ring-shaped) threads on them that prevent them from being removed as easily as smooth shank nails. When driven, the thread creates a “locking” effect with wood fibers, which gives it greater resistance from withdrawal.

    The ICC considers this and other nail shank thread types as "deformations." According to the International Staple, Nail and Tool Association (ISANTA), "The most common method to make a "deformed" shank is to start with smooth round wire that has been drawn down to the nominal diameter of the finished nail. During the manufacturing process, special machinery rolls and compresses the steel to "deform" the smooth shank into the desired shape:  ring, screw, etc."

    So in other words, the term "deformation" is not a negative one. It simply describes the fact that threaded shank nails differ from smooth shank nails, which have what’s considered a "regular" formation.

    If you’re driving nails into a material where expansion and contraction is an issue (such as with subfloors, or where fasteners are exposed to the changing elements), you’ll want ring shank nails. Ring shank nails are great for surfaces exposed to high winds that might pull out a common nail. They’re ideally suited for softer woods that might otherwise split when nailed.

    Applications: Siding, Roof Decking, Asphalt Shingles, Underlayment, Subfloors (See Installing Subfloors: Nails Vs. Screws.) 

    Another example of nail shanks, the ring shank nail

    Screw Shank Nails

    Screw shank nails combine the benefits of a nail with those of a screw. You get the ease of drive that a nail offers, and approximately the same holding power as that of a screw. The thread forces the nail to turn as it’s driven, essentially forging its own thread in the wood. As with ring shank nails, the threads create a locking effect that makes the nail more difficult to remove.

    This type of nail takes more force to drive than both smooth and ring shank nails, but provides greater pull-through resistance than either. While ring nails are more suitable for softer wood species, screw shank nails are ideal for hardwoods. A longer, more complex manufacturing process (and increased holding power) means that screw shank nails are generally more expensive than smooth and ring shank nails too.

    Applications: Decking, Flooring, Pallet Assembly, Siding, Fencing, Framing, Sheathing

    Simpson Strong Tie Nails With Screw Shanks

    Helical & Other Nail Shanks

    Specifically designed for use with hard yet brittle materials, such as concrete or brick, masonry nails are hardened to prevent bending or breaking when they’re driven. Rather than a threading, as with ring and screw shank nails, fluted shank nails feature linear grooves that allow them to be easily driven without breaking apart the concrete. You may also see the term helical nails, which are also used for concrete and steel. 

    Applications: Furring, Floor Plates, Drywall Track To Concrete, Steel Beams

    There are other specialty types of nail shank, such as barbed shank, helical threaded shank, stepped-shank, knurled shank, and others—each designed for specialized applications. To further sharpen your nail knowledge, read more about nail components.

     


     

    Shop Nail Gun Depot:

    All Collated Gun Nails

    Coil Framing Nails

    Plastic Strip Framing Nails

    Paper Stick Framing Nails

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  • 10 Surprising Facts About Wood

    Recently, we were asked what type of nailer to use with a specific wood. And it got us thinking—what about wood? We talk a lot about tools and fasteners, but not so much about the actual material we use to build, make and play. So we compiled 10 interesting tidbits about wood. After all, where would we be without pine for lumber, or the hickory bats used in America’s favorite pastime? So, let’s take a swing and learn a few things.

    A Wooden Bridge Over a Creek

    Here are 10 Cool Facts About Wood:

     

    1. Trees not only absorb water, they filter and produce it. A single tree can absorb up to 100 gallons of water and release it into the air—in a day.

    2. There are more than 23,000 types of trees. They’re broadly divided into two groups—hardwood and softwood.

    3. The terms “hardwood” and "softwood” can be a bit misleading, as they don’t necessarily refer to the strength of the wood, but rather how the tree propagates. Hardwood trees are deciduous, have enclosed seeds and lose their leaves in a season. Most softwoods are evergreen with their seeds residing in cones. 

    4. Cedar, pine, fir, and other softwoods make up approximately 80% of the lumber used in construction, including framing and roofing. (Shop our framing or roofing tools and fasteners here). Softwoods are fast growing, more easily worked, and feature a wide grain.

    Image of Wooden Flooring

    5. Often used for carving, oak is extremely durable but difficult to work. It has a high tannin content, which makes it resistant to attack by insects. Take a wild guess at America's national tree.

    6. Oak and southern yellow pine (SYP) are the two most common woods used in pallet making. (See our tools for pallet and crate assembly.) 

    7. A softwood, cedar is used to make roof shingles. Easily sawed and nailed, cedar is a good insulator and it's resistant to humidity.

    8. Some of the most common natural woods used in flooring include the hardwoods maple, cherry, and oak. Other popular choices are teak and walnut. Click here to shop flooring tools and fasteners.)

    9. Native to North America, the Douglas fir is the traditional choice of Christmas trees. Other popular types include Scotch pine, cypress, cedar, and Colorado blue spruce.

    10. A 12-ton Norway spruce was used for the 2018 Rockefeller Center Christmas tree. After the holidays, the wood will be cut into pieces, kiln dried and milled. The finished beams will be donated to Habitat for Humanity.

    Closeup of a Christmas Tree and Light

    Need a fun project for using leftover pallet wood? Habitat posted some steps for making a pallet Christmas tree. If anyone decides to try it, please post about it, below!

     

    ~ The Nail Gun Depot Team

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  • Cyber Weekend 2018 Tool Giveaway!

    Wouldn't it be nice to score a Free Tool when you shop Nail Gun Depot from November 23 – November 26? Coupled with our Cyber Weekend sale, there's even more to be thankful for!

    Purchase any item from the following categories for a chance to win! Prizes are detailed below.

    Power Tool Giveaway for Nail Gun Depot Cyber Weekend Sale

    Cyber Weekend Giveaway Details:

    All orders must be placed between November 23 and November 26. An order number in the specified category/brand counts as an entry. Winners will be featured on Nail Gun Depot's Facebook page and/or Nail Gun Network.

     

    Grand Prize:

    A LiT brand LED-light cooler AND Dewalt heated jacket, PLUS Nail Gun Depot swag. 

    LiT Cooler Grand Prize Nail Gun Depot Cyber Weekend GiveawayDewalt Jacket

     

    Hitachi/Metabo HPT

    Buy any Hitachi/Metabo HPT item for a chance to win a FREE Hitachi DS18DSAL 18V Li-Ion Compact Pro Cordless Drill W/ Flashlight - A compact yet hardworking drill and its bright companion.

    Senco

    Get any Senco item for a chance to win a FREE Senco PC1342 23-Gauge Micro Pinner Kit - A micro-pin nailer and a compressor combo; a winning team for a pro-looking finish.

    Paslode

    Order any Paslode item for a chance to win a FREE Paslode 515600 Brad Nailer - A perfect combination of reliability and versatility engineered into the same tool.

    Dewalt

    Purchase any Dewalt item for a chance to win a FREE Dewalt DWE575SB 7-1/4" Lightweight Circular Saw - Boasting a 15 Amp motor and weighing just 8.8 lbs, it's a lightweight powerhouse.

    Framing

    Order any framing nailer for a chance to win a FREE Martinez 4000 Wood Handle HammerSporting a 19 oz. steel head and curved hickory handle, this hammer packs some punch.

    Flooring

    Get any flooring nailer or stapler for a chance to win a FREE Powernail Power Palm Face Nailer - With a specially designed nose, magnetic nail holder and 160-degree swivel, it's a well-rounded tool.

    Roofing

    Purchase any roofing tool for a chance to win a FREE FallTech 8595A Roofer's Kit - A five-piece set that gives peace-of-mind; includes harness, vertical lifeline, shock absorbing lanyard, and roof anchor.

    Finishing

    Buy any finish/trim gun for a chance to win a FREE Hitachi RB18DSL 18V Cordless Blower and Li-Ion Battery - A great light-duty  tool for clearing debris and wood shavings from your work surface.

    Good Luck! And Happy Thanksgiving to All!

     

    ~ The Nail Gun Depot Team

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  • Cyber Weekend Alert! Our Hottest Deals of the Season

    Mark your calendars; Nail Gun Depot's Cyber Weekend starts November 23! That's when our biggest sales drop, so sink your nails into a few of the previews, below.

    For more specials, see the Cyber Weekend Catalog at Nail Gun DepotGet 'em before they're gone! Offers start November 23, 2018, and run through November 26, 2018 - while supplies last.

    Nail Gun Depot Cyber Weekend Sale

    A Deal a Day = One Excellent Weekend

    5% off NailGunDepot.com Site Wide

    A Hat You Won't Forget

    Cyber Weekend - Free Beanie with Framing Nailer

    Your Coffee's Coolest Keeper

    Free Insulated Tumbler with Any Metabo HPT/Hitachi purchase

    FREE Spares Are The Best Kind

    Free Battery with any Dewalt 20V Max Nailer/Stapler Kit

    Your Favorite Tunes—Even On a Roof

    Free Bluetoth speaker with a MAX framing or roofing nailer

    A Blade or a Hose... Can't Decide? Get Both!

    Blade & Hose Promo

    Winter is Coming.

    Free Cold Air Tool Oil With Senco Framing Nailer or Heavy-Wire Stapler

    To Err is Human, To Remove it is Divine

    Free Staple Remover with Purchase of BeA Upholstery Stapler

    Good Fence Staplers Make Great Fences
    Freeman Fence Stapler Deep Discount

     It's Like the LotteryBut With Tools

    Power Tool Giveaway for Nail Gun Depot Cyber Weekend Sale

    For more Cyber Weekend specials on Cadex, Grex, Makita, Metabo HPT/Hitachi, MAX, Paslode, Senco, and more, see Nail Gun Depot's Cyber Weekend page.

    Know someone else who likes a sweet deal? Share the cyber sale news on Facebook or Twitter!

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  • Fasten-Ating Facts: 6 Stainless Steel Fastener Myths

    With nature's most recent onslaughts, we're reminded of the need for fortitude in our structures, and dependability from the fasteners that secure them. Stainless steel fasteners outlast the elements better than other fasteners, and offer corrosion resistance where others don't.

    In addressing 6 myths about this durable metal, we uncover the qualities that make stainless steel fasteners among the most reliable you can buy.

    Families of Stainless Steel Fastener

    Myth 1. Stainless Steel Fasteners are coated.

    Stainless steel is a solid material throughout. In fact, it’s a self-healing metal, which means that if the surface is scratched, the metal naturally creates a transparent, protective layer. The process is known as self-passivation, and the protective layer is chromium oxide. This outer layer keeps the metal beneath from corroding.

    Some stainless steel fasteners are treated to a passivation process. The can involve putting fasteners through an acid bath that removes iron from the nail's surface, followed by an oxidizer to force conversion of chromium into an oxide form. This is done to mimic the nature self-passivation process in order to immediately enhance the corrosion resistance of the fastener.

    Myth 2 - Stainless Steel Doesn't Stain.

    The name “Stainless Steel" is actually a bit deceiving. Grease can leave its mark, minerals like calcium carbonate can build up (think of an old shower head), and hydrochloric acid, for example, can eat away at steel.

    Keep in mind that while stainless steel is resistant to corrosion, it’s not corrosion-proof (no metal is). Once it oxidizes, stainless steel does corrode, but at a much slower rate than other metals.

    Stainless Steel Fastener Myths

    Myth 3. Stainless Steel is a “pure” metal.

    Like many metals, including brass and bronze, steel is not an element itself. Rather, it’s an alloy or mix of metals. Regular steel consists of iron + carbon, often with other elements added to achieve desired characteristics. Steel is a strong material, but it’s also prone to rust.

    In 1913, Harry Brearly discovered that adding a specific mix of chromium to steel made it resistant to the effects of certain acids. The element chromium is added (at least 10%) to regular steel to make it stain-resistant.

    Myth 4. All stainless steel is the same.

    There are more than 100 grades of stainless steel, each sub-classified into its own “family."

    The most common kind of stainless steel is grade 304, part of the austenitic family, which contain 15 to 30% chromium. Grade 304 stainless steel contains 18% chromium, 8% nickel and a mix of other elements. This versatile material is known as 18/8 stainless, and is typically less expensive than higher-grade stainless steel, as it has less built-in chemical resistance.

    You may also be familiar with the second most common type of stainless steel. Grade 316 stainless steel has a greater portion of nickel--and the addition of molybdenum. Molybdenum is resistant to chloride, making it suitable for areas with exposure to harsh chemicals, salted roadways or coastal environments.

    Myth 5. Stainless Steel is stronger/weaker than regular steel.

    Stainless steel has a low carbon content and can’t be hardened by heat treatment, as regular steel can. So regular, untreated steel isn't as hard as stainless. However, in its hardened state, regular, heat-treated steel is in fact harder than stainless.

    Grades of Stainless Steel Nail

    Myth 6. Galvanized fasteners are just as good as stainless

    Even a well-coated steel nail will corrode before a stainless one. When it corrodes, this can affect the fastener's holding power.

    An added risk, there's the potential that the tool driving the fastener (or other abrasion) will chip the corrosion-resistant coating and prematurely begin the oxidation process. Furthermore, the tannins in certain woods (redwoods and cedar, specifically) and the metals used to treat lumber can react to the galvanized coating in fasteners, expediting corrosion.

    In many applications, including exterior construction, and in climates with humid, marine or extreme weather conditions, stainless steel is simply the optimal choice for fastener. Stainless steel fasteners aren't just used in construction; many boat and automotive upholsterers use stainless steel staples. To learn more about the differences between galvanized and stainless steel fasteners, see our article Everything to Know About Galvanized Nails.


     

    Shop Nail Gun Depot:

    Stainless Steel Nails

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  • How To Find The Correct Air Staples For A Staple Gun

    Why can’t I order staples for my pneumatic stapler by dimension?

    Unlike nails, staples are often sold by series, which doesn't tell you much about size. Furthermore, staples are not "one-size-fits-most," contrary to most categories of collated nails. Staples are instead measured not only by leg length and wire gauge, but also by crown width.

    Pro Tip: If you’re having trouble deciding on a staple gun, see “Choosing A Staple Gun For Your Project.”

    BeA Heavy Wire Stapler

    Crown Size

    The crown is the bridge, otherwise known as the horizontal part of a staple that joins the legs. Crown sizes are typically segmented into wide, medium and narrow designations. This can become tricky, as some manufacturers measure the inside of the crown, while others measure the outside (or exterior) of the crown.

    Staple crown type can vary by application. For example, some staples come with a flat top, while others have a round or "U-shaped" crown. However, we'll take a closer look at the various crown types in a later article.

    Leg Length

    While a staple series is typically determined by gauge and crown (which we'll cover later in this article), leg length can vary significantly - even within the same series of staple. See the different leg lengths for the 7/16” crown staple, for example, below.

    Staple with measurements

    There are a couple rules of thumb with regard to staple length:

    1. Leg length requirements vary by application type, as well as the base material you are driving the staple into. The staple has to be able to fully penetrate and clasp to form a tight bond.

    2. The longer the staple legs, the greater the hold or withdrawal strength.

    Pro Tip: Never try to force a staple into the wrong tool. Not only can this create a jam, but it could break the staple or damage the tool.

    Getting To The Point

    Most staples have chisel points, which taper to a point on both legs. This lets the staple legs drive directly into the base material.

    Another variation is the divergent-point staple, where the tips taper to opposing points. This forces the legs to bend outward in different directions. Divergent point staples are more difficult to pull out, providing greater holding power.

    Wire Gauge

    As with nails, staples are categorized by different wire gauges or thicknesses. Gauge is determined by the wire diameter, a standard set in the early half of the 20th century by American Wire Gauge standards. It might seem counter-intuitive, but the thinner the wire, the higher the gauge number. The smallest gauge staple wire we carry here at Nail Gun Depot is a 23-gauge staple for upholstery applications, while the largest is 9 gauge for wire fence building.

    Generally speaking, the thicker the wire gauge, the more rugged the application. For finer applications, like fastening upholstery to a furniture frame, a thinner gauge staple is preferable.

    What’s In A Staple Series?

    Finally, let’s talk staple series. Is there a rhyme or reason for the different series numbers?

    In short, yes, it’s true that tool manufacturers want you to use their staples -- and they do make proprietary fasteners to drive the point. Most staple series are determined by the staple's crown size (width) and gauge (thickness).

    One way many manufacturers make staple shopping easier, they may designate a particular "series" of staple that is compatible with their tool. Each staple series makes it easier to find the exact staple you need, without having to know all of the dimensions—or how the crown is measured.

    In order to consistently get the right staples for your tool, rely on the staple gun itself. More often than not, staple dimensions are printed on a staple gun's magazine.

    Types of Air Staple

    Finding The Right Fasteners

    To help you find the right series, we’ve created the Fastener Finder tool on Nail Gun Depot. Just choose your stapler brand/model from the drop-down menu, and we'll do the rest.  Even if you’re using an older model of air stapler, we can help identify the correct staples for your tool.

    Have other questions? Contact us here.

     

    ~ The Nail Gun Depot Team

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  • 10 Tips For Air Tool Safety

    Almost everyone who works in construction has a horror story that involves a power tool. You may have read our January 2014 blog post about a carpenter who accidentally fired a framing nail into his heart. Luckily, he survived the incident, but not without becoming a cautionary tale in Vice magazine.

    According to OSHA, nail gun accidents alone account for tens of thousands of serious injuries each year, and they account for more construction-related injuries than any other power tool. And those are only the reported ones.

    Just because you’re working on a weekend project, or using a lightweight power tool, doesn’t reduce the risk for injury.

    Nail Gun Safety

    Before You Pull the Trigger

    What are the best ways to prevent air tool accidents? Job one is to READ THE INSTRUCTIONS. In fact, you should do so before even firing the tool, which we admit is hard to do when a brand new air gun is burning a hole in your tool bag.

    You’ll notice the larger part of a tool’s manual is comprised of warnings; exclamation points in rounded triangles, circles with diagonal slashes through them and occasionally curious illustrations. You’ll see “no horseplay” a lot in user manuals. The warnings are easy to gloss over, but heed them. A power tool mishap can simply ruin your day, or it can shorten your career. Before becoming a statistic, familiarize yourself with the following safety tips.

    Senco Safety

    10 safety tips to follow when using an air tool:

    1. Read the manual.
    2. Wear protective gear, including safety glasses, shoes, gloves, hard hat, face shield, ear plugs, and whatever else the task requires.
    3. Use the right fasteners for the tool. This can prevent damage to the tool as well as accidents down the line.
    4. Maintain your tool, hoses, and compressor. Occasionally inspect tools for damage, replace worn parts and use air tool oil, if need be. RolAir has some great tips for maintaining an air compressor.
    5. Store tools in a dry place and clear off any debris after using. Moisture, dust and fumes can damage tools. Read our blog on How To Avoid Destroying Your Pneumatic Nailer for more information.
    6. Keep a clean work area to avoid tripping and combustion. NEVER blast away debris from a workspace or from skin using a compressor. It can propel metal particles, fragments or chips. Air driven under the skin can cause an embolism. If you clean an object with a compressor, OSHA has specific regulations for protective gear, chip guarding and air pressure (below 30 PSI).
    7. Always use the correct air pressure required for the tool. Check the user manual for guidelines, or learn more about PSI here.
    8. Opt for Sequential over Contact fire. Reserve rapid bump firing for high-volume, high-speed applications. See our video on safe trigger use. Also, respect the rebound. After driving a fastener, allow the tool to recover before for making contact with the surface again.
    9. Keep your finger OFF the trigger until you’re ready to drive a fastener. Always refrain from pointing a tool at anyone.
    10. Turn your tools off when not in use. That includes air nailers, staple guns, air compressors, etc.

    Construction Safety

    Besides ensuring your tool is in working condition, make sure you are, too. Don’t overreach, and avoid alcohol or other substances that can cloud judgment or impair movement. Want to see more? Our friends at Senco have even more great safety tips for using power tools.

     

    ~ The Nail Gun Depot Team

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  • Hitachi Power Tools To Become Metabo HPT

    Big news from an age-old brand, as Hitachi Power Tools announced they will transition the iconic "Hitachi" brand name to "Metabo HPT." The branding change is set to begin September 2018, with the launch of the company's new MultiVolt cordless platform. Hitachi anticipates existing product lines will transition no later than early 2019.

    But, what does this mean for Hitachi tool owners?

    Hitachi Power Tools Renames to Metabo HPT in North America

    Here's what we know:

    First, and foremost, Hitachi wants owners to know this transition will have no effect on the quality of their tools and service. Warranties will remain unaffected by the re-branding, so if you recently purchased a new Hitachi tool, rest assured that your warranty will not change.

    Furthermore, build quality remains the same - Metabo HPT tools will share identical parts and engineering technology as current Hitachi tools.

    So, what will change? In Hitachi's official announcement today, the company emphasizes they are simply re-branding their tools with a new name and logo. Users may see minor changes to part numbers, once the transition is complete, but will otherwise enjoy the exact same tools that built Hitachi's reputation for quality and value.

    Hitachi Metabo HPT

    Why change the name? Hitachi Power Tools USA was acquired by an investment firm, which elected to change the company name, as it is no longer affiliated with Hitachi Ltd. While Metabo HPT and Metabo are both owned by the same group of companies, each brand will operate independent of the other.

    What won't change? According to Hitachi, products will retain current brand identity: same color, same models, same warranties and the same battery interchangeability. They will be made by the same people, in the same factories, with the same specifications and focus on innovation that customers have come to expect. All products will continue to be covered and supported by the same industry-leading warranties and service. Hitachi Power Tools products will be interchangeable with Metabo HPT products, and Metabo HPT products will be interchangeable with Hitachi Power Tool products.

    Hitachi Metabo HPT Transition

    What products will transition to Metabo HPT? In the official release from Hitachi, the company states their full line of power tools, fasteners, accessories and outdoor power equipment products for North America will transition to the new Metabo HPT brand name.

    When will the transition take place? While the official announcement released March 12, 2018, the company plans to kick-start the transition in September, with the launch of their MultiVolt cordless platform. For existing Hitachi products, we don't expect to see most models' branding change until December - and into the 2019 calendar year.

    Metabo HPT packaging and signage at point of sale during the transition will feature both names and logos, to clearly communicate the changeover from Hitachi Power Tools.

    As the transition approaches, stay tuned for additional details. Here's a link to Hitachi Power Tools' official news release.

     

    ~ The Nail Gun Depot Team

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  • Cost-Efficient, High-Quality Tools For 2017 Holiday Gifting

    The holidays are here, and Nail Gun Depot wants to make sure you’re giving a gift that will stay productive well beyond the holiday season. Check out our top picks for cost-efficient (quality-assured) tools and accessories for the holidays:

    First on the list, the Fasco-Maestri 7C-16 3/8” Crown Electric Stapler is great for everything upholstery. This 100% electric fine wire stapler, designed with super durable reinforced fiberglass, is ideal for any picture frame construction, decorative trim, upholstery, carpeting, furniture repair, cable sheathing, and many more projects. Pairing maximum power with high fastening speed, you’ll have no trouble getting the most from any project.

    Pairing nicely with the Fasco-Maestri electric stapler, the Spotnails P-97482 Heavy-Duty Upholstery Staple Remover does a great job removing fine wire upholstery staples. The perfect accessory for anyone working with upholstery, Spotnails’ staple remover is designed specifically to reduce the risk of snagging fabric. Its compact size and price also make for a great stocking stuffer.

    Back by popular demand, for finish and trim woodworkers, grab a Grex Holiday Bundle:

    Grex is offering several holiday gift sets this year. The first, a Grex P635 23 Gauge Headless Pinner Holiday Gift Set, for $148, includes a P635 headless pin nailer plus a FREE FT230.1 edge guide – a $70 value, but only available through Christmas! Give the gift of green, and still have some left in your wallet too. The Grex P635 pin nailer is lightweight, powerful, and has an industrial strength design for added durability. It’s the perfect reliable tool for light wood assembly, finish work, decorative trim, and craft work, among other projects.

    Grex Holiday Bundles

    The second set, a Grex 1850GB 18 Gauge Brad Nailer Holiday Gift Set, is $168 (until Christmas), and includes a 1850GB 18 gauge brad nailer and FREE FT230.1 edge guide. If you’re shopping for someone who loves projects working with trim and moldings, cabinet and light wood assembly, window beading, or jig fixtures, you can’t beat this special holiday bundle. This Grex “Green Buddy” features an extremely slim nose for extra precision in tight-to-reach areas.

    We’re also offering a Grex P650L Headless Pinner Holiday Gift Set. Currently listed at $248 for the 2017 holiday season, you get a P650L headless pin nailer and FREE FT230.1 edge guide, with savings added up to $70. This Grex bundle is an excellent gift for anyone who works with light wood assembly, rattan furniture, craft work, or mirror and picture frame assembly. For the little details, Grex’s FT230.1 edge guide allows for even greater precision on the job.

    Gifting for the level-headed? Stabila is offering a couple “Best of Three” bundles – great for anyone’s workshop:

    The first, a Stabila 48370 Classic Set, includes a 37448 48” type 196 spirit level, a 37424 24” type 196 spirit level, a 25100 torpedo level, and a carrying case. Built for quality and durability, and featuring a limited-time only price of $199.99, this deal is a steal. Made in Germany, these levels house crystal clear vials that will never leak, break, fog, or need recalibration. In fact, the vials are guaranteed for life. Talk about a gift that will last a lifetime.

    Stabila Level Bundles

    Stabila is also offering a 48380 Type 96M Magnetic Level Set. This set includes one 38648 48” type 96M magnetic level, one 38624 24” type 96M magnetic level, a 25100 diecast magnetic torpedo level, and a carrying case. As the name implies, every level in this set is magnetic – ideal for jobs that require hands-free work with metal. If you’re looking for a new level set for the holidays, don’t pass this deal up!

    For pneumatic fanatics, we have a couple awesome bundles to consider:

    Our Senco PC1342 23 Gauge Micro Pinner Kit includes an 8F0001N FinishPro 23SXP 23 gauge headless pin nailer, and a PC1010N air compressor. This deal, for the 2017 holidays, is still in stock at $229. The Senco FinishPro pinner is ideally suited for any intricate, light finish wood work and wood assembly. Powerful and precise with an ultra-narrow nose, this tool doesn’t split wood. The perfect mate, Senco’s PC1010N air compressor uses an oil-free pump and induction motor, cutting back on noise and reducing maintenance.

    Cadex Bundle

    Receiving an honorable mention this year, Cadex has the ultimate finish and trim bundle, exclusive only to Nail Gun Depot. Our Cadex V2/BUNDLE, which includes both 21 and 23 gauge Cadex pin nailers, an air compressor, 75’ air hose and sample pin pack. Priced at $599 with free shipping included, this package deal is only here until supplies run out.

    MAX out the volume with a new Bluetooth speaker:

    MAX USA Tools is making some noise, and while supplies last, you can too. For a limited-time, get a FREE Bluetooth speaker with ANY MAX framing nailer. This deal includes top-selling models like the SN883RH3 Full Round Head Framing Nailer and SN890CH3/34 Clipped Head Framing Nailer, among others. For roofers, and siding installers, we’re including a FREE tool bucket bag with purchase of ANY MAX roofing or siding nailer – while supplies last.

    Max Speaker Tool Deal

    And finally, for the high tech woodworker on a budget, it’s time to cut the cord:

    The Hitachi NT1850DE Li-Ion 18 Gauge Cordless Brad Nailer is a fantastic gift for those who don’t want the hassle of hoses and cords. Equipped with brushless motor technology – this Hitachi brad nailer delivers increased power at reduced weight, a longer tool life, and longer run time per charge compared to most competing cordless brad nailers. As a special holiday bonus, while supply lasts, Hitachi is including a FREE spare battery with this tool!

    Hitachi Cordless Promo

    One more tough-as-nails cordless, battery-only nailer in our holiday line-up, take a look at the new Bostitch BCN680D1 20V MAX 18 Gauge Brad Nailer Kit. Priced just under $299 for the holidays, this brad nailer pairs Bostitch brand quality with the latest cordless technology. Certain to bring cheer Christmas day and beyond.

    Be sure to note, our shipping experts recommend ordering no later than December 14, 2017 for delivery before Christmas.

    Which gift on this list would make you merry?

     

    ~ The Nail Gun Depot Team

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  • Everything To Know About Galvanized Nails - And Using Them

    Why use galvanized nails? The quick answer, to slow down the process of rusting and corrosion, by protecting the nail with a zinc coating. Galvanized steel nails will eventually rust (use stainless steel nails to completely prevent rust), but the galvanization (zinc coat) will prolong the nail's lifespan - as compared to non-coated alternatives. Because the cost of stainless steel is often two or three times that of galvanized steel, many contractors elect for the galvanized product in regions where building code doesn't specify otherwise.

    So, you've decided to use a galvanized nail, but now need to determine which type of galvanized coating to use.

    There are two main types of galvanized nail that you'll find on Nail Gun Depot, either Hot-Dip Galvanized (HDG), or Electro-Galvanized (EG). Other types of galvanization can include tumbler hot galvanizing and mechanical zinc plating (also known as peen-plating). You may also see certain galvanized products listed as 1000 hours galvanized, which indicates those items are rated to withstand 1000 hours - or more - of salt spray testing.

    Hot Dipped Galvanized nails are the highest quality of galvanization available, offering 1.7 mils minimum zinc coating thickness, evenly covering all nail surfaces from head to tip - and offering a 30-50+ year lifespan. The process for hot-dip galvanizing includes cleaning the steel body, submerging the nail into molten zinc, and spinning it to remove excess coating. Perfect for use indoor and outdoor, HDG nails provide a good balance of cost and quality. And, an added benefit, the coarse zinc particles offer added "cling" to whatever surface they come in contact with - providing additional holding strength.

    For the highest quality galvanized nail, look to see if it is ACQ approved, which indicates the nail can be used with ACQ pressure treated lumber. For HDG nails, ensure the nail meets ASTM A153 specifications for hot dipped galvanizing.

    For applications where lower quality galvanization is suitable, Electro-Galvanized nails are among the thinnest coating, at 0.36 mils maximum. Ideal for indoor applications, the EG coating has an average lifespan of 5-10+ years depending on the environment. Similar to HDG, Electro-Galvanized nails are also bathed in zinc, but with an electric current that charges the zinc acid and attaches it to the nail's body.

    Despite the benefits to using a galvanized nail, there are certain types of wood, such as cedar or redwood, where galvanized nails (especially those with a lower quality galvanization) will quickly rust and streak the surface, due to a chemical reaction with the wood. We typically recommend using stainless steel nails if working with these types of wood, for a guaranteed high-quality finish.

    When ordering, if you're looking specifically for Hot Dipped Galvanized nails, pay close attention to the product description. More often than not, if a nail is labelled as galvanized, but does not specifically indicate Hot-Dip Galvanized (HDG) anywhere, the nail is probably coated with a lesser quality galvanization, such as Electro-Galvanized (EG).

    Most nails offered through Nail Gun Depot are listed specifically by the type of material, coating, or galvanization they are manufactured with. For additional questions regarding which type of nail or staple is best for your project, consult a product specialist here. You can also learn more by visiting the American Galvanizers Association.

    Of course, always know the building codes and requirements for the area with which you are planning to work.

     

    ~ The Team At Nail Gun Depot

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