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  • Quick Tips For Fixing Framing Nailer Jams

    Nothing ties up work faster than a nail gun jam. It's a nuisance that can cut into your work, unnecessarily delaying projects. All nail guns will jam from time to time, no matter the brand, no matter the price. This applies equally to coil and stick framing guns. It's very easy, however, fixing framing nailer jams yourself.

    Read on to learn how to clear a fastener jam—and what causes a jam in the first place—so you can prevent them. Also, be sure to watch our helpful videos on the Nail Gun Depot YouTube Channel.

    Using a Hitachi NR83A5(S). This worker surely knows how to fix a framing nailer jam

    Clear An Impulse Framing Nailer Jam (also works for paper tape nail guns)

    One of our most popular tools is the Paslode CF325XP Cordless Framing Nailer, originally the Paslode Impulse framing gun. Because it is such a common tool, we get a lot of calls asking how to fix fastener jams. Well, it’s simple to do it yourself, whether on this or another brand of paper strip framing nailer. 

    Learn how to fix a framing nailer jam in a Paslode XP Cordless Framing Nailer

    1. Disconnect the power supply. For a cordless nailer, remove the battery and fuel cell. For a pneumatic nailer, disconnect the air hose.

    2. Remove the fasteners. You don’t want any flying out when you remove the stuck nail from the magazine.

    3. Using an Allen wrench, loosen the two screws underneath the depth adjustment.

    4. Using a screwdriver, gently separate the magazine assembly from the nose assembly. You’ll notice the driver blade is stuck with the offending nail behind it.

    5. Using the screwdriver again, push the driver blade down. If there’s a really tight jam, tap the driver blade down with a nail set. Pushing the driver blade down should help clear out the jam.

    6. Tighten the Allen screws back up, and you're ready to go.

    What Caused the Jam:

    Tape Collation Fail: The fasteners have been mishandled, or the paper tape has gotten wet. Nails will no longer line up properly.

    Slamming the Follower: This can also throw off the nail collation. Use enough force to close the follower, but don’t slam it shut.

    Incorrect Loading: Nails have been put into the magazine backward.

    Wrong Fastener Collation: If the nailer calls for a 34-degree paper collated nail strip, for instance, don’t try to use a 28-degree wire collated nail strip. Use the angle and collation directed by the tool manufacturer.

    Learn how to fix a framing nailer jam in a Metabo HPT/Hitachi NV83A5 Coil Framing Nailer

    Clear a Coil Nailer Jam

    Another fan-favorite framing nail gun is the Metabo HPT NV83A5 Coil Framing Nailer, previously known as Hitachi brand. Here's how easy it is fixing framing nailer jams in your coil nail gun.

    1. Disconnect the air supply.

    2. Remove the fasteners.

    3. Push the driver blade down by tapping it with a nail set and a hammer. If you’ve got an old driver blade on hand, you can also use that to push the current driver blade down.

    4. Make sure the driver blade is all the way down and remove the stuck fastener completely from the nose of the tool.

    5. Reload nails and reattach air supply.

    What Caused the Jam:

    Lack of Adequate Oil: The air cylinder in the nose needs plenty of oil to function properly. Too little oil, and the nails will be slow to feed, causing a jam. Pro Tip: For coil nailers, use 10-15 drops of oil before nailing.

    Misshapen Coil: A coil has to be round to feed properly. If the roll has become misshapen from being dropped or squeezed, you can try to re-form it. In some cases though, you just have to start over with a new coil.

    Wrong Fastener Type: Be sure the nail's shank diameter and collation match the tool's specified usage. Otherwise, the nails will not fit or feed properly in the tool. This is why many manufacturers have a coil nailer specifically designed for use with roofing nails, versus siding nails, versus framing nails.

     


     

    Shop Nail Gun Depot:

    Framing Nailers

    Framing Gun Nails

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  • How Screws Are Measured

    Screws come in a variety of types and sizes for an endless number of construction tasks—from woodworking to metal roof installations. But, choose the wrong length or width, and it can split the wood, or affect the soundness of a structure. As with staples, screw measurement is slightly more complicated than that of nails. Here are three essential measurements every tradesperson should know.

    Screw measurement has three main points

    Screw Measurement, In Three Parts

    There are three main screw measurements: gauge, length, and threads per inch (TPI). When shopping for collated screws at Nail Gun Depot, for instance, you’ll find screws labeled like this: Duraspin #8 x 1-1/4" #08X125CBACTS. So, what do the #8 and 1-1/4" mean?

    Screw Gauge

    The first number is screw gauge, which refers to the outside thread diameter. This is also known as “major diameter.” Screws with a major diameter less than 1/4” are typically labeled in sizes #0 to #14. Screws with a 1/4" or larger major diameter are labeled in fractions of an inch.

    For each gauge size, there is a decimal equivalent. Example: #1 = .073”. That number increases by .013” with each increasing size. For the #8 Duraspin screw (shown below), the decimal equivalent is 0.164”. Engineering Toolbox has a handy screw size chart that lists screw gauges and their decimal equivalents.

    Beyond major diameter, screws have other width measurements. The width beneath the threaded part of the screw is known as root diameter or “minor diameter." The measurement of the unthreaded part of the screw (if not fully threaded) is the shank diameter.

    Durasping Screw, Screw #8 x 1-1/4", #2 Square, Round Washer, Type 17 #08X125CBACTS

    Screw Length

    The next important aspect of screw measurement is shaft length. In the Duraspin screw mentioned above, the length is the second detail in its label—1-1/4". Shaft length is the part of the screw that drives into a surface. 

    The length measurement for a countersinking screw is the distance from the top of the head to the tip. This goes for flat-head, bugle-head, trim-head—and any other countersinking screw where the head can be driven beneath a surface.

    For a non-countersinking screw, it's the distance from the bottom of the head to the tip. So for hex-, pan-, button-, round-, and truss-head screws, length is measured from directly under the head to the tip. One exception: an oval-head screw, which can be partially countersunk, is measured from the widest point of the head to the tip.

    Below is an example of two non-countersinking timber screws from Simpson Strong-Tie. The first screw has a washer head with a low profile. The second screw also has a washer head, but a more prominent hex drive. Note where the length is measured on each.

    SDWS Log screw (SDWS221500)vand a SHWH Timber Simpson Strong-Tie Hex screw (SDWH271500G).

    Threads Per Inch (TPI)

    TPI is a measurement of the number of threads in a one-inch section of screw. The TPI measurement occasionally follows the screw gauge with a hyphen. For example, a screw labeled "#10-12" has a #10 gauge with 12 threads per inch. You may have heard the term "thread pitch," which refers to the number of threads per unit of measurement.

    Check out the detailed measurements, below, for the Senco Duraspin 08X125CBACTS washer-head screw. The #8 gauge screw has a major diameter of 0.17" and 8 TPI. The screw is 1-1/4" long, a measurement taken from the bottom of the head to the point.

    Technical information for Senco Duraspin

    If you're shopping for collated screws and need help, contact Customer Service for assistance.


     

    Shop Collated Screws

    Senco Duraspin Collated Screws

    Quik Drive Collated Screws

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  • 6 Tips: Preserving Tool Battery Power in Cold Weather

    Cordless tools are more common than ever these days, and what’s more, they keep improving as manufacturers continue to innovate. You’ve probably noticed that Lithium-Ion battery power has surpassed NiCad (nickel-cadmium) and NiMH (nickel metal hydride) in cordless tools—and nearly everything else we use. But in cold weather, Li-Ion batteries seem to lose steam. We'll help you preserve power in your cordless tool battery with 6 easy tips.

    Dewalt DCN693M1Li-Ion Cordless Metal Connector Nailer at Nail Gun Depot

    Benefits of Lithium-Ion Batteries

    Lithium-ion batteries have many benefits over their predecessors; they store a larger amount of electricity, have a lower rate of self-discharge, and are more compact/weigh less than other rechargeable batteries. These cordless tool batteries aren’t delicate flowers, but they do have more basic requirements for maintaining optimal performance. You may have noticed, for instance, that your Li-Ion-powered tool is a little less forgiving in colder weather.

    Batteries are a collection of chemicals and other materials assembled to create a reaction that will then power your tool. And chemicals inside of them can be impacted by extreme situational changes. On the plus side, if you can call it that, Li-Ion is more stressed by extreme heat than extreme cold. Protection circuitry mainly prevents over-heating. but It's up to you to prevent over-cooling.

    Here’s a fact: When the temp dips below 40°F, Li-Ion batteries don’t fully hold a charge. And trying to charge them at that temperature can permanently affect run-time. So, what to do?

    Preserving battery power, as in a Senco Lithium Ion 18 V Battery

    How to Preserve a Li-Ion Tool Battery in Cold Weather:

    1. Store (and charge) batteries within the temperature range recommended by the tool manufacturer. While you can discharge a tool battery in extreme cold, charging it in freezing temps (32°F or colder) is a no-no. You may not see the damage, that doesn’t mean it’s not happening inside the battery.

    2. If a Li-Ion battery has fallen below 40°F, place it in a room-temperature area for an hour or two and let it warm up. What is room temperature? About 72°F, give or take a few digits.

    3. Optimal temps aren’t always available job sites. When not using the Li-Ion tool battery in cold weather, remove it and place in a pants pocket to transfer some body heat to the battery. Another option is to use a gel warmer in the tool bag while it’s in the work car/truck.

    4. Don’t let a Li-Ion battery completely discharge before re-charging it. Unlike older battery types, Li-Ion doesn’t need to be completely drained/re-charged. Li-Ion batteries suffer from little to no “memory effect,” or low-charge capacity when continually charged from a partially charged state.

    5. Once you start to feel power lagging, swap out the battery with a spare and recharge the first one. Having a few spare batteries on hand will keep you powered up. Yes, you should have a spare battery. And yes, we sell those at Nail Gun Depot.

    6. When it’s time to store the battery for an extended period, leave 40% to 50% life in it. This helps keep it stable and keeps the circuit protection operational. Store the battery in a cool (40°F to 60°F), dry area on a plastic or wood (not metal) shelf. 


     

    Shop Cordless Tools

    cordless nailerscordless staplers and accessories, and cordless screw guns

    Shop Batteries

    Metabo HPT (Hitachi) batteries, Dewalt batteries, Senco batteries, and Bostitch batteries

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  • The 2018 Holiday Tool Buying Guide

    Somehow, December's crept up and it's already time to grab a holiday deal for your favorite woodworker! If you've got a tool nut on your list, we've got you covered.

    NGD Christmas Guide

    You can find an affordable gift for the carpenter, flooring installer, upholsterer or all-around handyman in our holiday tool guide, below. Psst: Special sale prices—and stocking stuffers—are only around while supplies last.

    Now, without further delay, Nail Gun Depot’s 2018 Gift Guide...

    Under $150—Flooring Tool, Micro-Pinner, & Upholstery Stapler

    We love the Freeman PFBC940 Mini 4-in-1 Flooring Tool, not just because it doubles as nailer/stapler, but also because it's completely affordable. The versatile tool drives narrow-crown staples and brad nails from 5/8” to 1-5/8” in length. So you can switch from woodworking to flooring like a boss.

    Stocking Stuffer: Free 50’ air hose, complete with fittings.

    Grex tools' dependability and power are practically legendary. The robust P635 23-gauge headless nailer features an auto-adjust fastener mechanism and a rear-exhaust with silencer. Part of a special holiday gift set, this micro-pinner's industrial-grade, yet lightweight design, is suitable for craft projects, decorative trim, and light furniture assembly.

    Stocking Stuffer: Free edge guide, a $30 value.

    Powerful but lean at 1.7” wide and 2 lbs., the German-made. BeA 71/16-421 upholstery stapler drives 1/4" to 5/8" staples with gusto. Great for handling trim work, bedding, upholstery, and cabinetry, this dexterous little tool is reliable and reasonably priced.

    BeA 71 16-421 stapler

    $150 to $300—Fencing Staplers, Brad Nailer, & Tool Belt

    Freeman pneumatic staplers make installing (and repairing) fences more efficient, and easier on the user. The 10-1/2-gauge Freeman PFS105 fence stapler and 9-gauge PFS9 fence stapler feature ergonomic engineering, quick jam releases and top-loading magazines, not to mention they're relatively lightweight. The 9-gauge nailer includes an optional T-handle for greater control.

    Stocking Stuffer: Free 50” hose with fittings & special holiday price.

    For those who appreciate the quality and dependability of Hitachi/Metabo tools, the NT50A5 PRO 18-gauge brad nailer is a great choice for the carpenter. Ideal for crown molding, paneling, and window casing, it's powerful and versatile. The NT50A5 even has a thumb-actuated duster for easy cleanup.

    Stocking Stuffer: Free stainless steel insulated tumbler.

    Really, just take your pick of Occidental Leather's awesome gear. Their hand-crafted tool holders are made here in America, in Sonoma County, California. The leather is top-grain cowhide and reinforced with copper rivets. For the greatest flexibility, we suggest the OxyLight Adjust-to-Fit Belt, which has a high-mount hammer holder. 

    Occidental Leather Adjust-To-Fit Tool Belt

    $300 and Above—Finish and Framing Nailers, & Air Compressor

    Senco's Fusion series eliminates the need for fuel cells, potentially saving hundreds of dollars per year. The 16-gauge F-16S Finish Nailer features a fast-charging battery and nose-mounted LED light. This powerful straight nailer is perfect for molding, furniture and cabinet framing, and paneling. 

    For framing, the brawny Paslode CF325XP Cordless framing nailer offers impressive battery life and runs in temps as low as 14°F. For finishing, the Paslode IM250A-Li finish nailer has an angled magazine lets you navigate challenging areas. Each tool comes with a carrying case, battery, charger, and more.

    Stocking Stuffer: Free spare battery, plus two fuel cells. 

    Finally, we suggest the AIRSTAK Systainer compressor from RolAir. This compact cubical wonder is ideal for carpentry work that requires mobility and a quiet output (70 dB). The compressor rests in a Systainer case with pull-up handle, and has a removable cord that can be stored inside. The compressor weighs about 30 lbs and delivers 2CFM at 90 PSI.

    Stocking Stuffer: Free RolAir T-shirt and limited-time sale pricing on select models.

    Rolair AIRSTAK Systainer Compressor

    ~The Nail Gun Depot Team

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  • Cyber Weekend 2018 Tool Giveaway!

    Wouldn't it be nice to score a Free Tool when you shop Nail Gun Depot from November 23 – November 26? Coupled with our Cyber Weekend sale, there's even more to be thankful for!

    Purchase any item from the following categories for a chance to win! Prizes are detailed below.

    Power Tool Giveaway for Nail Gun Depot Cyber Weekend Sale

    Cyber Weekend Giveaway Details:

    All orders must be placed between November 23 and November 26. An order number in the specified category/brand counts as an entry. Winners will be featured on Nail Gun Depot's Facebook page and/or Nail Gun Network.

     

    Grand Prize:

    A LiT brand LED-light cooler AND Dewalt heated jacket, PLUS Nail Gun Depot swag. 

    LiT Cooler Grand Prize Nail Gun Depot Cyber Weekend GiveawayDewalt Jacket

     

    Hitachi/Metabo HPT

    Buy any Hitachi/Metabo HPT item for a chance to win a FREE Hitachi DS18DSAL 18V Li-Ion Compact Pro Cordless Drill W/ Flashlight - A compact yet hardworking drill and its bright companion.

    Senco

    Get any Senco item for a chance to win a FREE Senco PC1342 23-Gauge Micro Pinner Kit - A micro-pin nailer and a compressor combo; a winning team for a pro-looking finish.

    Paslode

    Order any Paslode item for a chance to win a FREE Paslode 515600 Brad Nailer - A perfect combination of reliability and versatility engineered into the same tool.

    Dewalt

    Purchase any Dewalt item for a chance to win a FREE Dewalt DWE575SB 7-1/4" Lightweight Circular Saw - Boasting a 15 Amp motor and weighing just 8.8 lbs, it's a lightweight powerhouse.

    Framing

    Order any framing nailer for a chance to win a FREE Martinez 4000 Wood Handle HammerSporting a 19 oz. steel head and curved hickory handle, this hammer packs some punch.

    Flooring

    Get any flooring nailer or stapler for a chance to win a FREE Powernail Power Palm Face Nailer - With a specially designed nose, magnetic nail holder and 160-degree swivel, it's a well-rounded tool.

    Roofing

    Purchase any roofing tool for a chance to win a FREE FallTech 8595A Roofer's Kit - A five-piece set that gives peace-of-mind; includes harness, vertical lifeline, shock absorbing lanyard, and roof anchor.

    Finishing

    Buy any finish/trim gun for a chance to win a FREE Hitachi RB18DSL 18V Cordless Blower and Li-Ion Battery - A great light-duty  tool for clearing debris and wood shavings from your work surface.

    Good Luck! And Happy Thanksgiving to All!

     

    ~ The Nail Gun Depot Team

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  • Cyber Weekend Alert! Our Hottest Deals of the Season

    Mark your calendars; Nail Gun Depot's Cyber Weekend starts November 23! That's when our biggest sales drop, so sink your nails into a few of the previews, below.

    For more specials, see the Cyber Weekend Catalog at Nail Gun DepotGet 'em before they're gone! Offers start November 23, 2018, and run through November 26, 2018 - while supplies last.

    Nail Gun Depot Cyber Weekend Sale

    A Deal a Day = One Excellent Weekend

    5% off NailGunDepot.com Site Wide

    A Hat You Won't Forget

    Cyber Weekend - Free Beanie with Framing Nailer

    Your Coffee's Coolest Keeper

    Free Insulated Tumbler with Any Metabo HPT/Hitachi purchase

    FREE Spares Are The Best Kind

    Free Battery with any Dewalt 20V Max Nailer/Stapler Kit

    Your Favorite Tunes—Even On a Roof

    Free Bluetoth speaker with a MAX framing or roofing nailer

    A Blade or a Hose... Can't Decide? Get Both!

    Blade & Hose Promo

    Winter is Coming.

    Free Cold Air Tool Oil With Senco Framing Nailer or Heavy-Wire Stapler

    To Err is Human, To Remove it is Divine

    Free Staple Remover with Purchase of BeA Upholstery Stapler

    Good Fence Staplers Make Great Fences
    Freeman Fence Stapler Deep Discount

     It's Like the LotteryBut With Tools

    Power Tool Giveaway for Nail Gun Depot Cyber Weekend Sale

    For more Cyber Weekend specials on Cadex, Grex, Makita, Metabo HPT/Hitachi, MAX, Paslode, Senco, and more, see Nail Gun Depot's Cyber Weekend page.

    Know someone else who likes a sweet deal? Share the cyber sale news on Facebook or Twitter!

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  • Prevent Burnout By Oiling An Air Nailer Or Stapler

    Considering how much they can cost, and how hard they work, air tools are really an investment. That’s why oiling an air nailer (or stapler) is so important. It ensures a return on your investment--and that wearable parts, like O-rings, aren't prematurely fried. It's also super easy to do.

    We've tackled a few "burning questions" about oiling an air nailer or stapler to keep them running for years to come.  

    OilingNailer2

    How often should I oil my tool?

    Daily. And if you’re working on an extended project, oil the tool before you start working and again mid-way through the day (after a lunch break, for instance). If the nailer's sat unused for a while, you definitely want to oil it before using it again.

    What kind of oil should I use?

    Only use lubricating oil made specifically for pneumatic tools, such as Senco Pneumatic Tool Oil or Paslode Lubricating OilOther oils lack the correct viscosity or contain ingredients that can destroy the seals, disintegrate O-rings, or may even cause combustion. Keep the WD40, compressor oil, motor oil, transmission fluid, etc. out of your air tools.

    Also, if you’re working in below-freezing conditions, you'll need a tool oil that's formulated for temperatures below 32 degrees Fahrenheit and contains anti-freeze. Try Paslode Cold Weather Tool Oil.

    What oil not to use on an air nailer

    How much oil do I need?

    All you need is 5-10 drops of oil. Drop the oil into the air inlet, the nozzle where your air hose attaches to the tool.

    What happens if I don’t use tool oil?

    The O-rings in the tool will dry up, causing the tool to malfunction. It will also cause unnecessary wear on its components, and potentially cause corrosion. To learn more about maintaining your nail gun, read our post on How to Avoid Destroying Your Pneumatic Nailer

    Pro Tips:

    • Make sure the air tool is OFF before adding oil.
    • Do not oil the tool's magazine, as this attracts dust and dirt. You definitely don’t want any debris stuck in the magazine, which can cause fastener jams.
    • Drain the air compressor at the end of each day. This keeps condensation from building up in the compressor, entering the tool, and then corroding it.

    Have questions? Just contact NGD's knowledgeable customer service.

     


     

    Shop Nail Gun Depot:

    Nail Guns

    Paslode Tool Oil & Accessories

    Staple Guns

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  • New Fine-Tuned Finishing Nailers From Senco & Hitachi

    A finish nailer is versatile, tackling projects in trim work, cabinets, casing, crown molding, and even furniture assembly. Meeting demands of the modern carpenter, Senco brings renewed brawn and fine-tuning to its latest finish nailer. Meanwhile, Hitachi looks to past favorites as inspiration for its new PRO series finishing nailers. Here's a closer look.

    Senco 16 Ga FInishPro 16XP Angle

    Tougher on Materials

    Senco's new 2-1/2” FinishPro 16XP gets leaner and meaner, and attempts to eliminate fastener jams. It improves upon and replaces the Senco FinishPro32 Nailer, now discontinued. Like the previous version, the FinishPro 16XP is sturdy yet lightweight at 4 lbs., firing 16-gauge brad nails from 1-1/4" to 2-1/2”.

    So what's the news on this updated model? An upgraded firing system is the most notable feature. Acknowledging a change in the industry to using harder, denser materials, Senco equipped the 16XP with a piston and driver upgrade. Coupled with a new magazine feed system, the finish nailer more reliably delivers fasteners, then more thoroughly and consistently drives them into tough pro-grade materials.

    Finer Firing

    Accuracy is another improvement, thanks to improved sight lines. A stamped steel spring on their EZ-Clear latch system means a slimmer, more robust latch. Now there’s a tighter hold on the drive track, resulting in greater control and pin-point accuracy when firing, even in hard-to-reach areas. The revised latch design virtually prevents jams and makes quick work of clearing any that occur.

    There’s also selectable actuation on the tool, letting you easily switch from bump fire to sequential firing modes. Another nice quality is an integrated push-button air blower to clear away debris. Senco extends durability to the overall appearance as well, with a powder coat finish and a cast-in logo. The tool comes with storage case, tool oil, wrench, no-mar pad and plug, all backed by the company's 5-year limited warranty. Check out the product video here to see it in action.

    Hitachi NT65A5 16 Ga Finish Nailer

    Hitachi Looks Back, Moves Ahead

    Enthusiasts of Hitachi (soon to be Metabo HPT) are already aware that the A5 Series recaptures some features of their beloved classics. Additions to the new line incorporate aspects like the prized motors in their original models, as well as fewer moving parts, and simpler maintenance.

    NT65A5 PRO Finish Nailer

    Those who remember the original NT65A3 will be happy to find the new NT65A5 16-Gauge PRO Finish Nailer uses the same motor. So, what was worth saving from the A3 model? A cylinder valve system, which gives the new model "the quickest response and the fastest driving speed of any 16-gauge finish nailer," says Hitachi. The NT65A5's cylinder valve system is “unmatched,” they add. That's quite a statement.

    The tool features a light, 4.9 lb. body (without the industrial-grade aluminum hook) and fires 1-1/2” to 2-1/2” straight finish nails. A high-capacity magazine on the NT65A5 holds three strips of nails, meaning there will be fewer pauses to re-load. A sturdier, high-grade aluminum magazine also helps those fasteners fire smoothly.

    Should a jam occur, the NT65A5’s quick-clear nose provides easier access to fasteners. Other features on the NT65A5 include selectable actuation, a 360° adjustable aluminum hook, safety glasses, a no-mar tip, and a canvas tool bag.

    HItachi NT50A5 18 Ga Brad Nailer

    NT50A5 2” PRO Brad Nailer

    Just as its sibling above, the NT50A5 2” PRO Brad Nailer is part of the A5 series. This new 18-gauge nail gun fires brad nails from 5/8” to 2”. It also asserts an improved air flow between the head valve and cylinder, giving it more muscle and greater efficiency over the NT50AE2, Hitachi's price-point oriented brad gun. Users can expect a 30% power increase in this small but mighty tool.

    In its compact 2.9 lb. body, the NT50A5 delivers well-balanced handling, selectable actuation, a sturdy aluminum magazine, and a safety that's set behind the nose for easier access to tight corners. Other features include a 360° adjustable exhaust, rubber grip, ambidextrous belt hook, auto dry-fire lockout, and an integrated air duster. The tool comes with the no-mar tip, tool bag and safety glasses. As with other Hitachi tools, it's backed by a 5-year warranty.

    So, which will find its way into your air tool arsenal? Just contact our Customer Service team to learn more.

     

    ~ The Nail Gun Depot Team

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  • 10 Tips For Air Tool Safety

    Almost everyone who works in construction has a horror story that involves a power tool. You may have read our January 2014 blog post about a carpenter who accidentally fired a framing nail into his heart. Luckily, he survived the incident, but not without becoming a cautionary tale in Vice magazine.

    According to OSHA, nail gun accidents alone account for tens of thousands of serious injuries each year, and they account for more construction-related injuries than any other power tool. And those are only the reported ones.

    Just because you’re working on a weekend project, or using a lightweight power tool, doesn’t reduce the risk for injury.

    Nail Gun Safety

    Before You Pull the Trigger

    What are the best ways to prevent air tool accidents? Job one is to READ THE INSTRUCTIONS. In fact, you should do so before even firing the tool, which we admit is hard to do when a brand new air gun is burning a hole in your tool bag.

    You’ll notice the larger part of a tool’s manual is comprised of warnings; exclamation points in rounded triangles, circles with diagonal slashes through them and occasionally curious illustrations. You’ll see “no horseplay” a lot in user manuals. The warnings are easy to gloss over, but heed them. A power tool mishap can simply ruin your day, or it can shorten your career. Before becoming a statistic, familiarize yourself with the following safety tips.

    Senco Safety

    10 safety tips to follow when using an air tool:

    1. Read the manual.
    2. Wear protective gear, including safety glasses, shoes, gloves, hard hat, face shield, ear plugs, and whatever else the task requires.
    3. Use the right fasteners for the tool. This can prevent damage to the tool as well as accidents down the line.
    4. Maintain your tool, hoses, and compressor. Occasionally inspect tools for damage, replace worn parts and use air tool oil, if need be. RolAir has some great tips for maintaining an air compressor.
    5. Store tools in a dry place and clear off any debris after using. Moisture, dust and fumes can damage tools. Read our blog on How To Avoid Destroying Your Pneumatic Nailer for more information.
    6. Keep a clean work area to avoid tripping and combustion. NEVER blast away debris from a workspace or from skin using a compressor. It can propel metal particles, fragments or chips. Air driven under the skin can cause an embolism. If you clean an object with a compressor, OSHA has specific regulations for protective gear, chip guarding and air pressure (below 30 PSI).
    7. Always use the correct air pressure required for the tool. Check the user manual for guidelines, or learn more about PSI here.
    8. Opt for Sequential over Contact fire. Reserve rapid bump firing for high-volume, high-speed applications. See our video on safe trigger use. Also, respect the rebound. After driving a fastener, allow the tool to recover before for making contact with the surface again.
    9. Keep your finger OFF the trigger until you’re ready to drive a fastener. Always refrain from pointing a tool at anyone.
    10. Turn your tools off when not in use. That includes air nailers, staple guns, air compressors, etc.

    Construction Safety

    Besides ensuring your tool is in working condition, make sure you are, too. Don’t overreach, and avoid alcohol or other substances that can cloud judgment or impair movement. Want to see more? Our friends at Senco have even more great safety tips for using power tools.

     

    ~ The Nail Gun Depot Team

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  • Installing Subfloors: Nails vs. Screws

    Can’t decide whether to use nails or screws to install subflooring? Choosing the right fastener can make all the difference in the quality and value of your installation. Before making a decision, consider the following key points:

    Which is faster?

    When time is of the essence, nailing is the quickest fastening option when installing subfloor. Regardless of firing mode, an air nailer lets you drive nails within seconds of each other, which saves time compared to using a screw gun. Screws need to be twisted into the subfloor, which takes more time than simply shooting a nail into subfloor material.

    SN902XP_SUB-FLOOR

    However, some screw guns, like the Senco DuraSpin DS440-AC, are auto-fed. A collated strip of screws in this case makes screwing subfloors a little faster, although it’s not as swift as nailing.

    Which is more economical?

    If you’re on a tight budget, nails are the more economical solution. But, not all nails are created equal. Stainless steel nails, for instance, offer a higher quality, but are pricier. Overall, screws tend to be somewhat more expensive, but like nails, some offer better quality for a higher price.

    With that said, it’s imperative you choose a fastener compatible with your subfloor thickness and material. The quality and correct type of fastener can literally make or break your floor. The better the quality now, the longer your floor will last later – not to mention the sturdier it will be.

    Which has better holding power?

    As far as nails go, ring shank nails are a popular choice for subflooring. A ring shank has extra grip and holding power, compared to other shank types, and creates a tighter subfloor. Although ring shank nails have a good hold, screws have more overall holding power by comparison. With a larger thread gripping a bigger surface area around them, screws hold your subfloor very tightly – allowing no wiggle room for shifting or loosening.

    Paslode TetraGrip Installation

    Several nail manufacturers, such as Senco and Paslode, have released their own proprietary solutions to improve the holding strength of a subfloor nail. Senco's Whisper Grip nail features lower rings designed to fully engage and grip the joist or studs, while upper rings ensure the nail remains countersunk - even if the joist or studs are missed. Paslode's TetraGRIP System takes it a step further, with a barbed thread design that when driven into wood, bonds with the fibers without destroying the wood. Paslode describes it as “rotation without destruction.”

    Which is more durable?

    Consider the heating and cooling of floors during the summer and winter months. Subfloors and fasteners, like any other material, will expand and contract with temperature. This means that movement, even at a micro level, will occur. The smaller thread on a ring shank, compared to the larger screw thread, doesn’t provide as much grip as the larger one does. This means that the ring shank nail acquires less stress, but can essentially “move with the floor” more so than a screw can.

    By comparison, the screw has much better holding power, and can therefore contribute to an overall tighter subfloor. However, when the subfloor expands and contracts with temperature, or even house movements, the screw can’t move with the shift. This builds stress in the screw, which can cause the screw head to shear off in extreme circumstances. Likewise, if a screw is not driven flush, is over driven, or the wrong size screw is used, the screw head as an increased chance of breaking.

    Which fastener prevents floor squeaks?

    The fastener you choose will certainly play a part in whether your floor squeaks or not. Nails have greater potential for causing squeaking floors, due to their temperature flexibility. Movement between the subfloor and nail (even a ring shank) inevitably causes the two to become loosened over time, which creates floor squeaking – particularly in high-traffic areas.

    Screws, if driven properly, prevent creaking floors. A screw firmly holds the subfloor in place, which ensures a squeak-less floor for years to come.

    Quik Drive Subfloor Installation

    Are there any alternative options?

    Perhaps a happy medium in the subfloor nail versus screw debate, SubLoc Pro Scrail Fasteners offer a hybrid between the traditional nail and screw. Combining the versatility of a nail with the hold strength of a screw, they can be used with most framing nailers – meaning Scrails can be driven much faster than screws. Like a screw though, Scrail Fasteners can be adjusted and removed after placement.

    With aggressive threading along the whole shank, Scrails have exceptional holding power, ensuring the subflooring remains tight. Scrails also have a diamond coating, which provides extra grip once installed into the subfloor material. This improved holding strength means floor squeaks are virtually non-existent.

    For any subflooring project, always consult your local fastening schedule, and find out what fastener length is appropriate for your subfloor. Nail Gun Depot offers nails, screws and Scrails, as well as specifications for all of our subfloor fasteners.

     

    ~ The Nail Gun Depot Team

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