• Everything You Need To Know About Roofing Nailers

    Warmer, dryer weather means one thing - roofing season is here. At Nail Gun Depot, we've decided to dedicate the entire month of May to roofers, roofing, and everything in between. Join us as we explore everything you need to know about roofing nailers and other roofing tools - when you enter the Nail Gun Network.
    Senco RoofPro 455XP
    What makes a roofing nailer different from any other type of nail gun? The difference is in the detail. Roofing guns are built to drive nails that are appropriate for most types of asphalt and fiberglass shingles, waterproof tar paper and insulation board. Whether you are installing a new roof, or re-roofing, roofing nailers are built specifically for what they are named.
    A key feature shared between roofing guns, they are designed to drive coil nails - coil roofing nails to be precise. By using coil nails, roofing nailers can go longer between refills - reducing the need to stop and climb off a rooftop to refill the nailer's magazine. A coil magazine design also helps improve the tool's ergonomics, making it less awkward to maintain hold of while crawling around on a roof.
    MAX CN445R2 Features
    Don't be fooled, quality means everything for a roofing nailer. Most roofing contractors use their tools on a daily basis during peak roofing season, so it's essential that the tool you purchase is dependable and provides several years of worry-free service. When it comes to roofing nailers, trust the guys who know the business best. Senco offers two excellent roofing tools, the 445XP and the 455XP - paired with a five-year manufacturer's warranty for added peace of mind. The Hitachi NV45AB2 is another popular model that has withstood the test of time. Last, but certainly not least, the MAX CN445R2 (replaced by MAX CN445R3) offers roofing contractors the affordability of a competitive price point, paired with the durability of a construction-grade tool. Any of the roofing nailers we've listed above should provide several years of excellent service.
    When it comes to installing roof felt, cap coil nailers, also known as plastic cap nailers, are pivotal to any roofing operation. Cap nailers drive a coil nail in tandem with plastic cap, providing additional holding strength and protection versus a standard nail. Stinger also offers a series of cap staplers that are designed to do the same - only with staples instead of nails.
    Stinger CN100 Cap Nailer
    Next to roofing nailers, hammer tackers (hammer staplers) are a necessity for any installation where roofing paper will need to be laid before shingles are nailed into place. These slap staplers work the same way as a standard hammer, only instead of pounding a nail into place, the impact of a hammer tacker triggers the firing of a staple into the surface with which it makes contact.
    Here's To Nailing Your Next Roof Installation,
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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  • What Does A Nail Gun Warranty Cover?

    Picture this, the nailer you bought six months ago suddenly stops running. The power supply is fine, but the tool's dead. Time to visit an authorized repair center - but who's on the hook for the repair bill? You might be surprised at the answer. Learn more about your nailer's warranty, what constitutes a wearable part, and everything else you need to know before picking up the tab for your tool's repair bill - here on the Nail Gun Network.
    The best advice we can give you regarding warranty coverage for your tool - or any item for that matter - read the fine print carefully. Every manufacturer has their own legal staff that writes and reviews what is covered in a product warranty, down to the smallest screw. With that said, use the following as a general overview of what would typically be included within the warranty coverage for a brand-new nail gun. Always consult the manufacturer's warranty policy before filing your claim.
    Freeman Tools Warranty
    Believe it or not, the clause that trips up our customers most frequently - when they find out their warranty does not include wearable parts. This leads to the next question, what's considered a wearable part? There's a general consensus among manufacturers that wearable parts include the following components: o-rings, bumpers and driver blades. Some manufacturers might categorize additional components as wearable, but you can almost always guarantee the three parts above WILL NOT be included in your warranty coverage.
    NOTE: Some warranties only cover parts, excluding labor expense. This is particularly true in warranties that extend beyond the standard one-year guarantee. Generally, each manufacturer will specify if this is the case.
    Bostitch Warranty
    Don't kick the dirt just yet! All three of the components mentioned earlier are relatively inexpensive to repair, and are considered regular maintenance items on your nailer. Just like you would change the oil filter in your car or replace the brakes, these items require periodic attention to keep your nail gun performing at its best.
    Furthermore, what about the components that ARE covered by the warranty? Most brands of nail gun, staple gun or screw gun offer a standard one-year manufacturer's warranty. Some brands go above and beyond, offering additional protection for their product owners. If you are looking for a lifetime guarantee, Quik Drive stands behind their screw gun attachments with their limited-lifetime warranty. While it only covers the attachment (motors generally come with one year of coverage), it demonstrates the quality and durability representative of these products. Bostitch and Freeman Tools offer seven-year warranties on many of their nailers and staplers, and Senco offers a five-year warranty on its XP line of pneumatic tools.
    Senco Tools
    One final point to remember, a warranty's coverage only protects against normal use. It's ultimately up to the manufacturer to determine whether or not the owner has taken the necessary measures to ensure their tool was properly cared for prior to failure. In almost all instances, this rules out accidental damage or undue abuse. For example, if the nailer was left outside permanently and exposed to harsh conditions as a result, it could void your warranty coverage. Likewise, if a roofing nailer is dropped from a two-story roof, coverage would most likely be voided as well. Making alterations to a tool is another way to void its warranty.
    Here's our best advice. Maintain your tools per the manufacturer's specifications, see that they are not misused or abused, and have them serviced at the first sign of trouble. Some manufacturers offer the ability to register your tool online, which helps to confirm the range of time your warranty is valid. Save your sales receipts and keep your tool's service records on-hand if applicable. If you stick to these rules, your nailer, stapler or screw gun should provide many years of reliable service.
    Nailing Your Warranty Needs,
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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  • What's A Palm Nailer Used For?

    You've probably heard of them - may have even seen one - but still don't know what a mini-palm nailer is used for. Mini-palm nailers, also known as palm nailers, are not your traditional nail gun. A member in the nailer family, palm nailers serve a different purpose than the collated nailers that most people think of when searching for a nail gun. Discover the purpose of palm nailers, how they can be used, and why you need to add one to your tool shelf - when you enter the Nail Gun Network.
    Senco PC1195 Application
    You ask, "what's a palm nailer?" To put it simply, mini-palm nailers are small pneumatic tools that drive bulk nails individually. Most palm nailers are designed to drive large framing nails, joist hanger nails or other bulk nails that are similar in size. The biggest difference between a pneumatic framing nailer and a palm nailer - collation. Traditional air-powered framing nailers drive collated gun nails, commonly known as strip nails and coil nails. These nails are held together in collation, meaning they are adhered together in a strip or coil by various bonding agents, which include metal wire, glue, paper tape or plastic. On the other hand, palm nailers drive individual, non-collated variations of these nails. And don't forget, both types of pneumatic nailer still require an air compressor to operate.
    Bostitch Palm Nailer
    This probably leaves you wondering, "why would I use a palm nailer instead of a collated nail gun?" Collated nailers are ideal for projects that require repetitive nailing in quick strokes, but because of their size, they are often too bulky to fit in tight, hard to reach spaces. That's where a mini-palm nailer can become the most useful tool in your systainer box. Palm nailers are designed to pick up where a collated nailer leaves off. Uses for palm nailers include framing, decking, fencing, metal connector straps, pole barn construction and much more - just think of them as a pneumatic nailer specifically designed to fit into hard to access spaces. A great example of an inexpensive, well-built palm nailer, check out the Senco PC1195.
    Powernail Power Palm
    Some palm nailers, such as the Powernail Power Palm, take it a step further to fill gaps in niche applications. The Power Palm is designed to drive L-Cleat flooring nails, making it a must have accessory nailer for flooring installers and general remodeling contractors. A specially designed nose makes this palm nailer ideal for applications such as blind nailing, top nailing, transitions, doors and corners.
    Your Palm Nailing Experts,
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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  • The Box Stapler Buying Guide For Packaging & Shipping

    You might be wondering, why haven't I heard of a carton stapler before? The simple answer, unless you manage a packing, shipping, or carton assembly operation - you probably haven't come in contact with one of these tools. Want to know what a carton closing stapler is good for? Well, it's all in the name. Learn more about the different types of carton closers and box staplers, applications they excel at, and tips to consider before purchasing - available on the Nail Gun Network.
    Bostitch Carton Closer Diagram
    Before selecting a carton stapler, you need to consider what it will be used for. Aside from the obvious - for use with cardboard - you will want to review the average volume of your operation, intervals of use, the thickness of cardboard or corrugated you are working with, and more. For business owners packing and shipping cardboard boxes in volume, most rely on their carton closing staplers to keep their operation running. Carton staplers offer increased revenue potential, efficiency, and provide a stronger seal versus other fastening agents.
    To start, take a look at the thickness of your cardboard. Cardboard boxes are typically available in single, double or triple walls. Most carton staplers can handle single walled cardboard with ease. If you are working with double or triple wall cardboard, you will need a box stapler specifically designed for thicker applications, such as the Bostitch BTFP12182 Triple Wall Carton Closing Stapler or one of the ISM 3G Series box closing tools.
    Bostitch Carton Staple Diagram
    Next, look at your operation's volume. For low volume packaging, a manual carton closing stapler might be sufficient to get the job done. For medium to high volume production, you will need either a pneumatic, electric or cordless carton stapler. In high volume applications, the option for roll staples versus the standard stick of staples is also available.
    Choosing the right staple for the task is key. The wider the crown and thicker the wire - the more secure the staple will be. Pay careful attention to the type of staple required for your application - this will ultimately determine the range of carton tools you can choose from. Look at the wire dimension (thickness), the crown (width), and the leg length.
    Now that we know the basics in choosing a carton stapler, let's look at the different types of packaging staplers that are available.

    Top Carton Staplers

    Generally speaking, top carton staplers are the most common box closing staplers - especially in low to medium volume packing and shipping facilities. Top carton staplers are excellent for high and low volume carton closing and packaging. Depending on the set up of your workspace, several businesses utilize cordless carton closers, such as the 12-Volt battery powered models by Bostitch, to decrease production time and improve versatility (remember, no hoses or cords).
    Bostitch Box Staplers

    Plier Staplers

    These self clinching staplers are designed for industrial applications in packaging, bedding, displays, set up boxes and more. Recommended for light assembly, packaging, corrugated construction and shoe-making. Plier staplers are primarily intended for manufacturing. Choose between models from Klinch-Pak, Senco, BeA, Bostitch and more.
    Senco Clinch Stapler

    Post Bottomer Carton Staplers

    Post bottom carton staplers are strictly industrial in their function. These box staplers are designed to tackle a variety of cardboard and corrugated stapling applications on assembly lines, or in designated work stations. Post bottomers are too heavy and bulky to be moved around frequently, so they are generally only used in businesses where production is in a fixed location. Choose between manually operated models, which include several options from Josef Kihlberg, or pneumatic models such as the Bostitch F84-138 manual box bottomer carton stapler.
    Josef Kihlberg Post Bottomer

    Bench Mounted Carton Staplers

    Bench mounted carton staplers are designed for light assembly, typically in manufacturing. They are excellent for clinching end flaps together, five-panel folds, overlap box closure, bag closure, tagging, shoes, and other cardboard applications requiring light assembly. Nail Gun Depot features a variety of BeA bench mounted carton staplers.
    BeA Bench Mounted Carton Stapler
    Your Source For Carton Closing Knowledge,
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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  • How To Choose The Correct Screw For Your Project

    Collated screws from Senco, Quik Drive and other manufacturers come in several shapes and sizes - each intended for a specific use. Every collated screw is designed to fulfill its own niche application. Find out which screw is right for you when you enter the Nail Gun Network.
    How To Choose A Screw
    Just like you would classify a nail, a screw can be broken down by its head, thread and tip. Screws can be divided down further by coating, material and color. Considering this, here's a break down of typical screw features based on the application of its intended use.


    Drywall screws need to provide enough holding power to keep drywall board firmly in its place, but don't necessarily need the same rigidity and coating as a screw that would be used for an exterior application. Most drywall screws will have a bugle head with a Phillips drive. The bugle head allows the screw to sink flesh with the drywall board surface. The thread and tip will determine the type of material the drywall board is being fastened to. For drywall to wood screws, a sharp point tip paired with coarse threads is relatively common. For drywall to steel, a drill point tip is more common.
    Senco Drywall Screw Diagram


    For an exterior application, such as decking, screws need to not only provide the appropriate holding power - they also need to be durable enough to stand up to the outside elements indefinitely. Collated deck screws from Senco or Quik Drive generally feature a square drive, with either flat or capped heads. A sharp point tip and thicker threads will increase holding power and ease of drive. Because these screws will be exposed to moisture and other outside particles, most deck screws come with a manufacturer specific coating to help delay the weathering process. In coastal regions, many builders are required to use stainless steel screws for exterior applications to further prevent deterioration of the fastener.
    Senco Deck Screw Diagram

    SubFloor & Underlayment

    With wood to wood applications, you will typically find that most available screws will have a sharp tip with a flat head and twin threads for additional holding strength. Either zinc, phosphate, galvanization or some form of coating will most likely also be present. The coating will help to improve the overall durability of the screw if it becomes exposed to moisture.
    Quik Drive SubFloor Screw

    Metal Roofing

    Metal roofing screws are a little bit different than those used for wood applications. Metal to metal screws, particularly those used for metal roofing, will have a raised head with threads that run from head to tip. For extra heavy-duty metal roofing applications, you might even find the screw has a washer at the base of its head to help provide even greater holding strength.
    Quik Drive Metal Roofing Screw
    For the average homeowner, you typically won't use anything beyond basic drywall, decking or wood screws. For contractors, depending on the applications you work with, the possibilities are endless.
    Providing The Knowledge To Prevent A Screw Up,
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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  • Everything You Need To Know About Cordless Nailers

    Are you looking for a cordless nailer, stapler or screw gun? Maybe you don't like the noise or cord restrictions that come with an air compressor? While pneumatic tools will always have a place in the construction industry, several contractors and DIYers have come to adopt cordless fastening tools over their air-powered counterpart. The biggest benefit to cordless, it goes anywhere you need it to. No hoses, no compressor, no hassle - as long as you have the tool charged that is. Find out what types of cordless nail guns, staple guns, and screw fastening systems are available, when you visit the Nail Gun Network.
    Cordless Nail Guns
    Cordless technology in the fastening industry is improving daily. As battery technology and tool engineering continues to enhance itself, nailers are becoming more powerful, holding a longer charge, yet building the same reputation for durability and ruggedness that pneumatic tools have earned. With cordless framing nail guns, finish nailers, carton closing staplers, and screw guns available - there are several cordless options to choose from.

    Nail Guns

    Cordless nailers come in a variety of shapes and sizes. From framing nailers such as the Paslode CF325Li (replaced by Paslode CF325XP), to finish and trim nailers such as the Senco Fusion, contractors and DIYer's have come to love these tools for their increased versatility and quiet operation. One big thing to remember if you are considering a cordless nailer - several models require the use of a fuel cell in addition to a battery pack. A fuel cell is a small canister of compressed gas that releases energy in conjunction with the tool's trigger being fired. This is especially necessary in larger nailers that require more energy to fire. Taking it one step further, keep in mind that one size doesn't fit all when talking about fuel cells. Each manufacturer will specify the correct fuel cell for their tool. Smaller finish and trim nailers, such as the Senco Fusion line, do not require fuel cells since they do not require as much energy to sink a nail to its proper depth.
    Cordless Brad Nailers
    Spoiler Alert: Grex has announced the launch of an all-new 18 gauge cordless brad nailer, powered by battery and long-life fuel cell. This tool is lightweight and nimble - we anticipate it to be extremely competitive with other similar models currently on the market. Expect an official release sometime in 2015.

    Staple Guns

    Cordless staple guns are growing in popularity, but are not as common as their not-so-distant relative, the nail gun. Bostitch recently released three new cordless carton closing staplers, the DSW-3522, the DSW-3519 and the DSC-3219. These cordless staplers run on a 12 volt lithium-ion battery, capable of securing 800 staples per 45 minute charge. In general, these Bostitch tools are particularly useful in high-production packing and shipping facilities. For those looking to avoid a power supply completely, there are also several manually operated models.

    Screw Guns

    Quite possibly the most popular cordless option of the three types of fastening tools we've covered, cordless screw gun sales are growing at a rapid pace. In particular, Senco's DuraSpin cordless screw system(s) are among the most recognized collated screw guns in the industry. Senco DuraSpin cordless models are powered by the same 18 volt battery pack that can be found on the Senco Fusion, designed to drive between 500 and 700 collated DuraSpin screws per charge. Simpson Strong-Tie also recently partnered with Fein, to release the first cordless screw gun motor for their Quik Drive auto-feed screw system. The Fein motor is compatible with all Quik Drive auto-feed attachments.
    Senco DuraSpin Cordless
    In wrapping things up, it's only fair to cover the counterpoints in going cordless too. The biggest downside to cordless - the cost. Plan to spend anywhere from $100 to $300 more for a cordless nailer, stapler or screw gun, over the cost of its pneumatic or electric counterpart. If you are only using cordless tools, part of this cost can be offset by eliminating the need for an air compressor. The other point to consider before switching to cordless, be sure to plan for enough battery charge to keep your tool running throughout the duration of your project. Keep a car charger or spare battery on hand for larger projects, especially if you are planning to use the cordless tool for extended periods of time. If required, keep an extra fuel cell handy too.
    All that's left to decide, are you ready to cut the cord?
    Your Fastening Tool Experts,
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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  • How To Avoid Destroying Your Pneumatic Nailer

    Basic maintenance on a pneumatic nailer can slash unnecessary repair costs, and will keep your air-powered nail gun running like new. But, despite minimal effort required for preventative maintenance, we continue to see far too many pneumatic tools reduced to scrap from lack of service. We've previously covered how to protect your pneumatic tools and compressor from cold temperatures - but what about year-round maintenance? Take a look at these professional maintenance tips to extend the life of most pneumatic tools, protecting your investment.
    Depending on the region, a big risk to any pneumatic tool is simply the environment it inhabits. Airborne particles can clog pneumatic nailers and cause undue wear to components within the tool. This is particularly true in coastal regions, where moisture and salt in the air increases the chance for system failure, rusting or corrosion. In areas with high moisture content in the air, it's extra important to avoid prolonged exposure to the elements. Invest in a systainer case or air-tight box to store pneumatic tools that are not in use. The same principle applies to areas that have a lot of dust or sand in the air - particularly when talking about prolonged exposure at a job site.
    Hitachi NV45AB2 Coil Roofing Nailer
    A universal rule for protecting and prolonging the life of a pneumatic nailer, make sure the tool is properly lubricated at all times. A regular cause for air nailer failure is component wear due to lack of lubrication. Just like you wouldn't drive a car without oil in the engine, a pneumatic tool requires the same attention. It's also crucial to note that pneumatic nailers and staplers require special lubricant, specifically labeled as pneumatic tool oil. Many generic lubricants eat through rubber over time, which will cause more harm than help in the long run (remember most pneumatic nail guns have rubber o-rings). NEVER use WD40, motor oil, transmission fluid or aerosol lubricants.
    Unless specified otherwise by the manufacturer, make sure pneumatic nailers, staplers and other fastening tools receive regular lubrication to moving parts. Even with a self-oiling valve design, it's important to keep watch that your pneumatic nailer is receiving the proper amount of lubrication. In general, we recommend putting two or three drops of pneumatic tool oil directly into the coupling joint, before connecting the air hose. Do so daily at the start and finish of use - and be sure to fire the tool two to three times to give the oil a chance to work through the valves.
    Surprisingly enough, many other causes for system failure on a pneumatic nailer can be prevented by simply using the tool properly. Before firing the nail gun, make sure you are using the correct size and type of nail. Pay careful attention to the nail's angle, as well as the collation.
    You'll also want to check the manufacturer's recommended operating pressure, before hooking up an air compressor, to avoid misfiring caused by inadequate air flow. Too much air pressure can drive nails too deep - whereas too little pressure can cause nails to not sink evenly. Furthermore, consistently using improper air pressure can damage the pneumatic tool over time.
    Make sure you are using the proper size air compressor too. For finish and trim work, small hand-carry compressors will typically perform adequately. For framing tools, or if you are planning to connect multiple air-powered nailers, larger wheelbarrow compressors could be a better fit.
    rolair compressor at jobsite
    As always, safety should be top priority. Always consult your owner's manual, or visit the manufacturer's website for detailed information about your pneumatic tool. For more maintenance advice, consult a certified repair center.
    Keeping Your Pneumatic Nailer On The Job,
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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  • Nail Gun Depot Is Celebrating Its 15th Anniversary

    It's hard to believe, but did you realize Nail Gun Depot has been around for 15 years? Launched in 2000, the site has played its part in the explosion of the Internet and e-commerce - surviving several events that have shaped the world we live in today. The NGD site we have come to know has lived through several refreshes and reconfigurations, the addition of new tools and technology, and the demise of outdated products. With annual visitors in the millions, Nail Gun Depot offers one of the largest, most comprehensive collections of fastening products available. From nailers to staplers, screw guns and fasteners, we've got something for every application. Don't take our word, see it for yourself!
    Nail Gun Depot 15th Anniversary
    Did you know Nail Gun Depot isn't just an e-commerce site, it's an information database? Choose from several resources to help pair the correct tool or fastener with your application. For example, the Fastener Finder feature on Nail Gun Depot let's you choose your tool - searching the site and matching your query with the appropriate fasteners. Need a bit more? Visit the Nail Gun Network blog and content database for how to projects, tool news, maintenance tips, and virtually everything else you need to know about power fastening tools.
    Nail Gun Network Logo
    But wait, there's more! Without loyal customers, Nail Gun Depot would be nothing. We want to take a second (or year) to thank all of our customers and visitors, whether you have purchased from us once - or visit the site weekly - thank you for your continued support. To remain one of the best in customer service, we are excited to announce a refreshed, mobile-friendly Nail Gun Depot is on its way. Look for the new Nail Gun Depot to launch later in 2015. Other initiatives on the way include a 15th Anniversary Giveaway - featuring Nail Gun Depot's "Bleed Orange Bundle" - as well as several other smaller giveaways and promotions throughout 2015 to thank our customers for 15 years in business. Look for a more extensive, larger Nail Gun Network too!
    Nail Gun Depot Brands
    It's customers like you that keep Nail Gun Depot alive and growing - so thank you again from the entire staff at Nail Gun Depot.
    Here's To Nailing Another 15 Years,
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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  • Everything You Need To Know About Senco's Fusion Nailers

    For anyone in renovation or remodeling, the name Senco Fusion is certain to ring a bell. One of the most recognized cordless finish and trim nailers in its class, the Senco Fusion packs innovation, technology and power - all in one handy cordless tool. Find out why you should try Senco Fusion - here on the Nail Gun Network.
    Senco Fusion Baseboard
    If you read up on tools and fasteners, you've seen the Senco Fusion line featured in magazines such as Popular Mechanics, Journal of Light Construction, Tools of the Trade, This Old House and many more. A tool that is recognized for its features, performance and quality, the Senco Fusion is much more than a basic finish tool, it's a new way of doing construction.
    Senco Fusion Drive
    Want to know what sets the Senco Fusion apart from its competition? Take a look:
    • Senco Fusion tools feature an 18V lithium ion battery, which guarantees longer charge life with less down time. With a quick-charge system in place, you can renew 80 percent of your battery charge in only 15 minutes. Drive up to three nails per second with no waiting period!
    • Features include a safety time out, precise depth of drive adjustment, bump fire operation, reversible belt hook, and LED work light.
    • Cordless design allows access in hard to reach areas without cords or hoses. Snap the battery into place, and you are ready to nail a range of applications from finish and trim, to baseboards, cabinets, paneling and more.
    • The Senco Fusion is available in four different model types, a 15 Gauge Finish Nailer, 16 Gauge Straight Finish Nailer, 16 Gauge Angled Finish Nailer, and 18 Gauge Brad Nailer.
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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  • DIY Tips: How To Install Flawless Drywall

    In honor of Nail Gun Depot's Screw Gun Showdown, let's take a look at one of the top uses for a screw fastening system, installing drywall. An important step in any major home renovation or remodeling project, knowing how to install drywall can save time and money. Learn how to install drywall, the best tools for the job, and other useful DIY tips - here on the Nail Gun Network.
    Quik Drive Drywall Attachment
    Most new construction projects mandate the use of drywall screws when installing drywall. Screws are certainly ideal, as their thread provides better holding power - especially in climates where wood is prone to expand and contract regularly. In some circumstances, drywall nails can be used to hang wallboard, but beware, over time nail popping and other imperfections to the wall might occur as the wood frame expands and contracts. For long-term quality, we recommend using collated drywall screws and a screw gun - for fast, easy, cost-effective drywall installation. Senco DuraSpin and Simpson Quik Drive are two competitive screw fastening systems that continue to offer best-in-class performance.
    Project Note: Most Drywall Screws Require A Phillips Drive.
    Another benefit to using screws over nails for drywall installation, it generally takes less screws to complete the project. Be certain to consult your local building code before beginning installation of drywall, as different regions have different requirements. Beyond building code, don't fall victim to silly, yet expensive errors.
    Senco DuraSpin Drywall Installation
    Even for beginners, drywall installation is relatively easy to pick up. Just pay careful attention to the following:
    • Prior to installation, make sure the lumber you are fastening drywall board to is within an acceptable range of moisture content, less than 19 percent by most standards. As damp wood dries out, it can lead to popping of fasteners - and splitting at seams.
    • Don't overlook sagging panels - particularly when installing a ceiling. Make sure to drive extra screws into place while pressing firmly on the loose board. In some extreme cases, an additional brace or bracket may be required to guarantee a firm fit. Likewise, watch for bulging at your vertical seams. If the drywall board swells at the seam - once it has been taped and sealed - it may require sanding. You can prevent this issue by ensuring there is no gap between drywall boards during installation.
    • Don't take the easy route when it comes to corners. Use a corner guard versus drywall tape and spackle. A corner guard will hold up better in the long run and is typically easier to work with than tape. You should also mark your studs and joists prior to installation of a drywall board. This will help improve the accuracy of your drive and will prevent additional repair work in problem areas.
    • Watch for imperfections in drywall tape. Don't ignore bubbles, streaks, splits or other noticeable imperfections in drywall tape as it is laid. If air is allowed between the tape and base, it will lead to separation later on. Tape that is not secured properly can eventually peel and will require repair and repainting. In areas where warm and cold air are allowed to converge regularly, eventual loosening and separation of tape from the drywall base is almost inevitable.
    • Make sure your screw gun is set to the proper depth. Depending on the thickness of the board, determine the appropriate screw length and depth adjustment for your tool. Driving too deep can cause noticeable divets in the drywall. Driving too short leaves the screw's head protruding. If installed properly, the screw's head should sit slightly below the drywall surface - leaving just enough room for compound to smooth the surface.
    Drywall Board
    To recap, make sure your framing is dry, mark your studs and joists for accurate drive locations, hold the drywall board firmly against the wood frame while fastening in place, line up boards for accuracy, scan and repair imperfections, and enjoy.
    Here's To Flawless DIY Drywall,
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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