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Tools & Fasteners
Tools & Fasteners
  • Quick Tips For Fixing Framing Nailer Jams

    Nothing ties up work faster than a nail gun jam. It's a nuisance that can cut into your work, unnecessarily delaying projects. All nail guns will jam from time to time, no matter the brand, no matter the price. This applies equally to coil and stick framing guns. It's very easy, however, fixing framing nailer jams yourself.

    Read on to learn how to clear a fastener jam—and what causes a jam in the first place—so you can prevent them. Also, be sure to watch our helpful videos on the Nail Gun Depot YouTube Channel.

    Using a Hitachi NR83A5(S). This worker surely knows how to fix a framing nailer jam

    Clear An Impulse Framing Nailer Jam (also works for paper tape nail guns)

    One of our most popular tools is the Paslode CF325XP Cordless Framing Nailer, originally the Paslode Impulse framing gun. Because it is such a common tool, we get a lot of calls asking how to fix fastener jams. Well, it’s simple to do it yourself, whether on this or another brand of paper strip framing nailer. 

    Learn how to fix a framing nailer jam in a Paslode XP Cordless Framing Nailer

    1. Disconnect the power supply. For a cordless nailer, remove the battery and fuel cell. For a pneumatic nailer, disconnect the air hose.

    2. Remove the fasteners. You don’t want any flying out when you remove the stuck nail from the magazine.

    3. Using an Allen wrench, loosen the two screws underneath the depth adjustment.

    4. Using a screwdriver, gently separate the magazine assembly from the nose assembly. You’ll notice the driver blade is stuck with the offending nail behind it.

    5. Using the screwdriver again, push the driver blade down. If there’s a really tight jam, tap the driver blade down with a nail set. Pushing the driver blade down should help clear out the jam.

    6. Tighten the Allen screws back up, and you're ready to go.

    What Caused the Jam:

    Tape Collation Fail: The fasteners have been mishandled, or the paper tape has gotten wet. Nails will no longer line up properly.

    Slamming the Follower: This can also throw off the nail collation. Use enough force to close the follower, but don’t slam it shut.

    Incorrect Loading: Nails have been put into the magazine backward.

    Wrong Fastener Collation: If the nailer calls for a 34-degree paper collated nail strip, for instance, don’t try to use a 28-degree wire collated nail strip. Use the angle and collation directed by the tool manufacturer.

    Learn how to fix a framing nailer jam in a Metabo HPT/Hitachi NV83A5 Coil Framing Nailer

    Clear a Coil Nailer Jam

    Another fan-favorite framing nail gun is the Metabo HPT NV83A5 Coil Framing Nailer, previously known as Hitachi brand. Here's how easy it is fixing framing nailer jams in your coil nail gun.

    1. Disconnect the air supply.

    2. Remove the fasteners.

    3. Push the driver blade down by tapping it with a nail set and a hammer. If you’ve got an old driver blade on hand, you can also use that to push the current driver blade down.

    4. Make sure the driver blade is all the way down and remove the stuck fastener completely from the nose of the tool.

    5. Reload nails and reattach air supply.

    What Caused the Jam:

    Lack of Adequate Oil: The air cylinder in the nose needs plenty of oil to function properly. Too little oil, and the nails will be slow to feed, causing a jam. Pro Tip: For coil nailers, use 10-15 drops of oil before nailing.

    Misshapen Coil: A coil has to be round to feed properly. If the roll has become misshapen from being dropped or squeezed, you can try to re-form it. In some cases though, you just have to start over with a new coil.

    Wrong Fastener Type: Be sure the nail's shank diameter and collation match the tool's specified usage. Otherwise, the nails will not fit or feed properly in the tool. This is why many manufacturers have a coil nailer specifically designed for use with roofing nails, versus siding nails, versus framing nails.

     


     

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    Framing Nailers

    Framing Gun Nails

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  • Fasten-Ating Facts: Understanding Nail Shank Types

    Often a make-or-break factor in roofing, pallet assembly or framing projects, nail shank type plays a critical role in U.S. building code. Using the wrong shank can leave you with a damaged roof, squeaky subfloor, or worse. The following are the most common gun nail shank types found in construction. Learn which is best for your job—and why.

    Choose from various nail shanks for construction applications

    Smooth Shank Nails

    Let’s start with the most common nail shank type. Smooth shank nails have no threading and are the easiest to drive. This also makes them the fastest type of nail to drive. Depending on strength and makeup, they can be driven into nearly any surface, and are suitable for a wide range of everyday construction applications—from framing to finishing.

    Pro Tip: Consult with building codes and material manufacturer guidelines before starting a project, to determine if you need to use a certain kind of nail or other fastener. You can also check with the International Code Council (ICC) construction-related specifications. 

    As you might imagine, smooth nails are the easiest shank type to produce, and thus, among the most affordable. What smooth shank nails offer in versatility, however, they lack in optimal holding ability. So you wouldn’t use them for jobs like roofing, where greater pull-through or withdrawal resistance is needed.

    Applications: Framing, Siding, Trim and Finishing, General Woodworking

    From Simpson Strong-Tie, a Smooth Nail Shank

    Ring Shank Nails

    Ring shank nails have annular (ring-shaped) threads on them that prevent them from being removed as easily as smooth shank nails. When driven, the thread creates a “locking” effect with wood fibers, which gives it greater resistance from withdrawal.

    The ICC considers this and other nail shank thread types as "deformations." According to the International Staple, Nail and Tool Association (ISANTA), "The most common method to make a "deformed" shank is to start with smooth round wire that has been drawn down to the nominal diameter of the finished nail. During the manufacturing process, special machinery rolls and compresses the steel to "deform" the smooth shank into the desired shape:  ring, screw, etc."

    So in other words, the term "deformation" is not a negative one. It simply describes the fact that threaded shank nails differ from smooth shank nails, which have what’s considered a "regular" formation.

    If you’re driving nails into a material where expansion and contraction is an issue (such as with subfloors, or where fasteners are exposed to the changing elements), you’ll want ring shank nails. Ring shank nails are great for surfaces exposed to high winds that might pull out a common nail. They’re ideally suited for softer woods that might otherwise split when nailed.

    Applications: Siding, Roof Decking, Asphalt Shingles, Underlayment, Subfloors (See Installing Subfloors: Nails Vs. Screws.) 

    Another example of nail shanks, the ring shank nail

    Screw Shank Nails

    Screw shank nails combine the benefits of a nail with those of a screw. You get the ease of drive that a nail offers, and approximately the same holding power as that of a screw. The thread forces the nail to turn as it’s driven, essentially forging its own thread in the wood. As with ring shank nails, the threads create a locking effect that makes the nail more difficult to remove.

    This type of nail takes more force to drive than both smooth and ring shank nails, but provides greater pull-through resistance than either. While ring nails are more suitable for softer wood species, screw shank nails are ideal for hardwoods. A longer, more complex manufacturing process (and increased holding power) means that screw shank nails are generally more expensive than smooth and ring shank nails too.

    Applications: Decking, Flooring, Pallet Assembly, Siding, Fencing, Framing, Sheathing

    Simpson Strong Tie Nails With Screw Shanks

    Helical & Other Nail Shanks

    Specifically designed for use with hard yet brittle materials, such as concrete or brick, masonry nails are hardened to prevent bending or breaking when they’re driven. Rather than a threading, as with ring and screw shank nails, fluted shank nails feature linear grooves that allow them to be easily driven without breaking apart the concrete. You may also see the term helical nails, which are also used for concrete and steel. 

    Applications: Furring, Floor Plates, Drywall Track To Concrete, Steel Beams

    There are other specialty types of nail shank, such as barbed shank, helical threaded shank, stepped-shank, knurled shank, and others—each designed for specialized applications. To further sharpen your nail knowledge, read more about nail components.

     


     

    Shop Nail Gun Depot:

    All Collated Gun Nails

    Coil Framing Nails

    Plastic Strip Framing Nails

    Paper Stick Framing Nails

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