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Tag Archives: BeA Upholstery Stapler
  • The 2018 Holiday Tool Buying Guide

    Somehow, December's crept up and it's already time to grab a holiday deal for your favorite woodworker! If you've got a tool nut on your list, we've got you covered.

    NGD Christmas Guide

    You can find an affordable gift for the carpenter, flooring installer, upholsterer or all-around handyman in our holiday tool guide, below. Psst: Special sale prices—and stocking stuffers—are only around while supplies last.

    Now, without further delay, Nail Gun Depot’s 2018 Gift Guide...

    Under $150—Flooring Tool, Micro-Pinner, & Upholstery Stapler

    We love the Freeman PFBC940 Mini 4-in-1 Flooring Tool, not just because it doubles as nailer/stapler, but also because it's completely affordable. The versatile tool drives narrow-crown staples and brad nails from 5/8” to 1-5/8” in length. So you can switch from woodworking to flooring like a boss.

    Stocking Stuffer: Free 50’ air hose, complete with fittings.

    Grex tools' dependability and power are practically legendary. The robust P635 23-gauge headless nailer features an auto-adjust fastener mechanism and a rear-exhaust with silencer. Part of a special holiday gift set, this micro-pinner's industrial-grade, yet lightweight design, is suitable for craft projects, decorative trim, and light furniture assembly.

    Stocking Stuffer: Free edge guide, a $30 value.

    Powerful but lean at 1.7” wide and 2 lbs., the German-made. BeA 71/16-421 upholstery stapler drives 1/4" to 5/8" staples with gusto. Great for handling trim work, bedding, upholstery, and cabinetry, this dexterous little tool is reliable and reasonably priced.

    BeA 71 16-421 stapler

    $150 to $300—Fencing Staplers, Brad Nailer, & Tool Belt

    Freeman pneumatic staplers make installing (and repairing) fences more efficient, and easier on the user. The 10-1/2-gauge Freeman PFS105 fence stapler and 9-gauge PFS9 fence stapler feature ergonomic engineering, quick jam releases and top-loading magazines, not to mention they're relatively lightweight. The 9-gauge nailer includes an optional T-handle for greater control.

    Stocking Stuffer: Free 50” hose with fittings & special holiday price.

    For those who appreciate the quality and dependability of Hitachi/Metabo tools, the NT50A5 PRO 18-gauge brad nailer is a great choice for the carpenter. Ideal for crown molding, paneling, and window casing, it's powerful and versatile. The NT50A5 even has a thumb-actuated duster for easy cleanup.

    Stocking Stuffer: Free stainless steel insulated tumbler.

    Really, just take your pick of Occidental Leather's awesome gear. Their hand-crafted tool holders are made here in America, in Sonoma County, California. The leather is top-grain cowhide and reinforced with copper rivets. For the greatest flexibility, we suggest the OxyLight Adjust-to-Fit Belt, which has a high-mount hammer holder. 

    Occidental Leather Adjust-To-Fit Tool Belt

    $300 and Above—Finish and Framing Nailers, & Air Compressor

    Senco's Fusion series eliminates the need for fuel cells, potentially saving hundreds of dollars per year. The 16-gauge F-16S Finish Nailer features a fast-charging battery and nose-mounted LED light. This powerful straight nailer is perfect for molding, furniture and cabinet framing, and paneling. 

    For framing, the brawny Paslode CF325XP Cordless framing nailer offers impressive battery life and runs in temps as low as 14°F. For finishing, the Paslode IM250A-Li finish nailer has an angled magazine lets you navigate challenging areas. Each tool comes with a carrying case, battery, charger, and more.

    Stocking Stuffer: Free spare battery, plus two fuel cells. 

    Finally, we suggest the AIRSTAK Systainer compressor from RolAir. This compact cubical wonder is ideal for carpentry work that requires mobility and a quiet output (70 dB). The compressor rests in a Systainer case with pull-up handle, and has a removable cord that can be stored inside. The compressor weighs about 30 lbs and delivers 2CFM at 90 PSI.

    Stocking Stuffer: Free RolAir T-shirt and limited-time sale pricing on select models.

    Rolair AIRSTAK Systainer Compressor

    ~The Nail Gun Depot Team

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  • How To Build & Upholster Your Own Salvage Pallet Ottoman

    To make sure you get the latest and greatest tips and techniques of the industry, the Nail Gun Network occasionally hosts a guest blogger or expert contributor. Today, we are excited to let Shelly Miller Leer of ModHomeEc and the Upholstery Club take control of the Nail Gun Network, with her special project post, "Salvaged Pallet Ottoman." Pay careful attention to how she uses her brand-new BeA 71/16-436LN 22-gauge long nose upholstery stapler.
    Whether you're sick of your old beat up coffee table, or you just need more pizazz in your space, creating an upholstered ottoman from a salvaged pallet is an easy weekend project. It's a little bit carpentry and a little bit upholstery. The biggest benefit of creating your own upholstered coffee table (or dog lounger) is that it's custom - you choose the fabric and the details. My inspiration came from a photo. It can be as simple as that.

     

    Materials:
    • A chemical free pallet
    • 1" x 4" pieces of pine or other wood to frame the bottom of the pallet
    • 1- 1/2" long wood screws
    • 2 yards of scrap fabric (burlap) to cover all but the bottom of the pallet
    • A piece of 2" foam (two pieces can be glued together to create a large enough piece)
    • Batting
    • 2+ yards of fabulous fabric
    • Spray adhesive for foam
    • Furniture legs and hardware
    • A black marker

     

    Tools:

    • Drill and drill bits
    • Scissors
    • Electric knife (to cut foam)
    • Glue gun (optional)
    Let's quickly talk about pallets. Not all pallets are suitable for an upholstered ottoman. Choose one that looks new, is sturdy, and requires the least amount of retrofitting. Pallets are rough and uneven. That's part of the charm and it's a good conversation point when bragging about your custom created ottoman.

    1. Measure and cut your wood pieces to fit the uneven bottom edge of the pallet

    2. Drill holes and secure the wood planks with screws so that they don't interfere with the placement of the corner leg plates

    3. Measure and drill holes for leg hardware. You may want the leg hardware to be attached so that you know how far the fabric can come under the frame.

    4. Flip frame over and wrap up the top and all sides like you're wrapping a present using burlap or scrap fabric

    *** The standard upholsterer's method to cover a square or rectangular frame is to secure the fabric with staples in the center of one side, move to the opposite side, then the two adjacent sides. You always start in the center and move out towards the corners, pulling and smoothing diagonally towards the corners, but leaving approximately 5-6" open at the corners for folding and fine tuning. This works for dining chair seats and all angular pieces.

    5. Place covered frame on top of 2" foam, making sure there's at least 1/2" over hang on all sides. Trace around frame with a big black marker.

     

    6. Keeping electric knife blade perpendicular to the foam, cut foam as traced

     

    7. Use spray adhesive to secure the foam to the burlap base

     

    8. Measure and cut batting to fit over the foam and wood frame

     

     

    9. This is important - DO NOT roll the batting UNDER the bottom of the frame. Secure it on the bottom of each side. You don't want a lumpy bottom edge.
     

    10. Corners are crucial to make this ottoman look professional. Make neat, tidy, hospital corners that are smooth, unpuckered and clean. This is the same technique as you'll use with your top fabric. Make it look professional!

    11. Trim off excess batting.

     

    12. Cut your fabric so that you'll have at least 3" of excess fabric on each side. This is known as "pull" - and you'll need it.

     

    13. Place fabric on top. Align any pattern, make sure everything is straight and start with the center of one side. Pull fabric under and attach just like you did the batting, only pull the fabric under the frame bottom. It's front to back, side to side, and move out towards the corners.

     

    *** The technique of pulling and smoothing at a diagonal and out towards the corners is what shows you know what you're doing. You want a smooth, even, slightly rounded top edge.

    14. Now make those corners look good by making that square corner as in the picture. Your hands are your best tool and sometime you'll need to get the frame on the floor and really be able to control the fabric.

    15. When the corner is just right, secure it with your stapler on the bottom of the frame.

    16. Trim off excess fabric, close around leg plates, attach legs.

     

    17. (Optional) Create and insert a time capsule and cover the bottom of the ottoman with a piece of scrap fabric as a dust cover by folding the edges under 1/2" and stapling in place every 3" around the bottom, folding back at the legs.

     
    Now that you have the insight, prepare your tools and get started on your own pallet ottoman. The Nail Gun Network would like to send a special thanks to Shelly Leer, who developed and wrote this guest post. If you are interested in learning more about upholstering techniques and project ideas, check her out or take one of her classes.
    ~ The Nail Gun Depot Team
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  • How To Get The Most From A Pneumatic Staple Gun

    Are you learning how to use a pneumatic stapler? Get the most out of your staple gun - find out how right here on the Nail Gun Network, by Nail Gun Depot.
    Let's start with loading the tool. Loading a staple gun can vary from tool to tool; however, the following provides general instruction for loading a typical pneumatic stapler.

    Before you start, it's crucial that you have the proper staples. The type of staple that your tool takes will vary from model to model, and manufacturer to manufacturer. Check your tool's specs or manual if you are confused about the type of staple it takes.You can also search for your tool's staples using our Fastener Finder.

    Once you have identified the correct staples, you need to load them. Most staple guns come in either a top or bottom loading variation. Medium and heavy wire pneumatic staplers generally load from the top, while most fine wire staplers load from the bottom.

    Before loading, be sure to disconnect the air supply and keep the stapler pointed away from you at all times - as you should for any firing tool.

    For a top loading stapler, pull the magazine follower back until it locks into position. After the follower is locked into position, place the strip of staples over the magazine rail. The staples should move freely, back and forth on the rail. The last step is to unlock the follower and release it - so that it pushes the staples into the nose of the staple gun for firing.

    If you have a bottom load stapler, locate the release first - which is generally found at the rear of magazine. Depress the release and slide the magazine rail away from the nose. Turn the stapler upside down and insert the staples into the channel, towards the nose of the stapler. Make sure the pointed ends of the staples are loaded - so they will fire into your application. After the staples have been loaded, slide the magazine rail back, towards the nose, until it locks into place. Now you are ready to connect your air supply and test fire.

    Staple guns are designed for a variety of applications, from upholstering furniture to decking and siding applications. With more than 200 available options on NGD, we're confident you can find the right stapler to get your project done right.

     ~ The Nail Gun Depot Team
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  • How To Choose The Right Upholstery Stapler

    Remodeling a chair or piece of furniture? If you work with - or are planning to do upholstery work - you will want to find an upholstery stapler that properly suits your needs. To the novice, you will want to select your staple gun based on its specific application. Upholstery staplers are designed for applications that range from industrial use to amateur fabric work. Finding the right one for you can be easy - if you know what to look for.

    For those just getting into upholstering, you will probably want to select your stapler based on the application you are intending to use it for. First, you will need to measure the material you are working with, to determine the gauge (thickness), crown (width) and leg (length) of the staple necessary for your project. Once you know the gauge of staple needed, you can find the appropriate stapler - you will also see that a variety of brands are available to choose from including Senco, BeA, Duo-Fast, Spotnails, Grex and more.

    Depending on the thickness of material, you will probably choose between a 20-gauge or 22-gauge upholstery stapler. Next you will need to decide whether you want a pneumatic (air-powered) tool or an electric tool. If you do not have an air compressor, an electric tool will bypass the need for one - however, pneumatic upholstery staplers are typically less expensive. 

    Once you've gained some additional experience, you might want to upgrade to a long nose upholstery stapler. The extended nose on these staple guns allows them to reach into tighter spaces.  Long nose upholstery staplers are typically used for more skilled projects, projects that require a higher level of intricacy. If you are sticking to small, simple upholstery work, using a regular nose upholstery stapler should yield the necessary results for your project. 

    For more help deciding on the right upholstery stapler, check out the ModHomeEc writers' review of upholstery staplers.

    ~ The Nail Gun Depot Team

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