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Tag Archives: Floor cleat
  • Must-Have Flooring Tools & Accessories

    If you remodeled or built a home recently, you've probably considered hardwood or laminate flooring for at least one room of the house. A must-have feature in new home construction and older home renovation, hardwood and laminate flooring has grown significantly in popularity throughout the last 10-15 years. We've shown you How To Install A Hardwood Floor, but what about the best tools to get the job done efficiently and effectively?
    Hardwood Floor
    To begin, let's recap the two traditional flooring tools that are available, flooring nailers or flooring staplers. For an in-depth look at the difference between these tools, check out "The Difference Between Floor Nailers & Flooring Staplers."
    Bostitch Floor Tool
    Determining which type of flooring tool to use is up to you. Today, we're just looking at a few of the best tools from each category, available for use on hardwood and laminate flooring applications.
    Powernail Stapler
    Let's start with flooring staplers. If you are looking for a top-of-the-line hardwood stapler, Bostitch offers an industry-leading line of flooring staple guns to choose from. Pneumatic or air-powered, two top-selling models include the Bostitch MIIIFS and the Bostitch EHF1838K. The biggest difference between these models, the MIIIFS is mallet-actuated (meaning you must strike the tool with a rubber mallet to drive the staple), whereas the EHF1838K is trigger-actuated. The MIIIFS is considered the flagship model of Bostitch floor staplers, but for many, the trigger-actuated firing of the EHF1838K is more desirable - especially for DIY users.
    Bostitch MIIIFS
    If you are looking for a less expensive option, 3 PRO is an up-and-coming brand that offers less expensive, durable flooring staplers. Models such as the 3 PRO S9032P and 3 PRO S9040P are inexpensive hardwood tools that are designed to compete with higher-end models from well-known manufacturers. The 3 PRO FSN50 not only drives flooring staples, it can also be used as a nailer. (Update: 3 PRO is no longer in business.)
    3 PRO FSN50
    Moving into floor nailers, you have the option to choose between manual or pneumatic powered tools. Just to refresh, as we mentioned earlier, pneumatic tools are powered by an air compressor, whereas a manual floor nailer is powered by human force. Bostitch and Powernail offer a few popular manual tools, but many opt for the easier to operate pneumatic models.
    Wood Floor Thickness
    Two popular pneumatic floor nailers, the Bostitch MIIIFN (the nailer variation of the MIIIFS) and the Powernail 2000 (replaced by Powernail 2000F) come recommended by many users. Again, the MIIIFN is mallet-actuated - as are most pneumatic hardwood nailers and staplers - whereas the Model 2000 relies on a trigger to fire.
    Powernail 2000
    A secondary tool that's worth considering, palm nailers are also frequently used to secure the initial floor board at the base of a wall. Don't underestimate the versatility of these tools - though we don't recommend using a palm nailer for bulk nailing applications. Built specifically for flooring applications, the Powernail Power Palm face nailer is designed with a special nose that allows it to accept flooring nails, an excellent option for hardwood flooring.
    Powernail Power Palm
    There are many other flooring tools to choose from, so don't feel limited to these models - including many others that also come highly-recommended - so be sure to look at all of your available options before selecting a tool. Also, keep in mind that each of these tools runs a specific range and type of fastener, so be sure that the range is relevant to the application.
     

    ~ The Nail Gun Depot Team

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  • What's The Difference Between A Floor Nailer & Flooring...

    So you are interested in replacing your hardwood floors, but you don't know which tool will work best for the job? If you look for a flooring tool, you will see there are flooring nailers and floor staplers. The tools may look similar, but which one is the one you need? The answer is, either tool can work for you, but let's explore some of the differences between a floor nailer and flooring stapler, to give you the most informed decision possible.
     
    Bostitch Miiifs
     
     
    Floor nailers are available in two variations, manual or pneumatic (air powered). You might hear a contractor refer to this tool as a flooring cleat nailer, as it most often takes cleat nails for fastening. A manual flooring nailer will require additional muscle, as it relies solely on its user's strength. On the other hand, pneumatic floor nailers assist the user by providing additional force, when inserting a nail. Either of these tools will require a user to hit the driver head when inserting a cleat. The amount of pressure required depends on the density of the wood being installed. A thicker wood will require longer cleats, which also calls for additional force to drive the fastener. You will find it easier to use a pneumatic floor nailer for thick woods, such as Brazilian Cherry.
     
    Powernail 2000
     
    Flooring Staplers are also available in manual or pneumatic variations, although manual floor staplers are typically not preferred in the construction trade. As you can see on Nail Gun Depot, electric staplers are also an option, depending on the source of power that you prefer - although pneumatic is by far the most common offering.
    A hardwood stapler anchors the flooring planks to the sub-floor, driving staples into the tongue of a wood plank. Recognized as an industry "staple," the Bosititch Miiifs is one of the most popular tools for the flooring stapler segment, thanks to its superior performance and time-tested reliability. Operating at 60-100 PSI, the Miiifs can achieve 420 pounds of driving power.
     
    Now that we know the tools available, let's look at the flooring fasteners that make the difference. As you saw above, the tools operate similarly, which means that the difference primarily lies in the fastener itself. It all boils down to nails versus staples. [Also note that you should not switch between nails and staples when installing a floor - whichever fastener you start with should be the only one used throughout the entire project.]
     
    A flooring nail, or cleat, is typically offered in either "L" head or "T" head variation - check and see which variation your nail gun requires. A cleat nail offers a sharp, rigid body to grip the sub-floor firmly. It also features a smooth portion of its body, which allows for seasonal expansion and contraction of the flooring. Typically, cleat nails are available in 16 or 18 gauge - although 20 gauge is also available for certain applications. The more durable option of the two, the drawback to cleats is their cost - compared to the cost of staples.
     
    "L" Cleat
     
    Floor staples provide two-pronged fastening for hardwood flooring. Flooring staples actually provide a stronger initial grip than cleats, but do not hold as firmly when the floor expands and contracts - which can eventually lead to creaking. Another drawback to staples, they can split the tongue of flooring - especially when the plank is less than 3/4" thick. Because staples are less costly to manufacture, they are typically the more cost-effective flooring fastener, when looking at cleats versus staples. However, you also have to consider the long-term durability of your flooring installation, when selecting between staples and nails.
     
    Floor Staple
     
    Regardless of the flooring nailer or stapler you choose to use, it is imperative that you understand your tools prior to using. Applying too much pressure can damage your floor, while applying too little pressure can cause cleats or staples to only be driven partially, resulting in each neighboring plank to not form a tight fit, ruining the entire project.
     
    If you need additional assistance in choosing the perfect flooring nailer, stapler or fastener for your job, Nail Gun Depot's customer service is ready to help!

     ~ The Nail Gun Depot Team

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