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Tag Archives: nail gun depot
  • Practicing Nail Gun & Power Tool Safety

    Do you practice safety awareness when using your tools? Most job related accidents can be avoided, if you take the proper measures to ensure safety on the job site.

    For a 58 year-old carpenter living in Minnesota, a simple mistake almost cost his life, when he accidentally fired a 3-1/2” galvanized framing nail directly into his heart. While building a deck, the man’s framing nailer slipped out of his hands. When he caught hold of it, hand still on the trigger, the gun’s nose bumped against his chest and fired directly into his heart. Thankfully, the nail missed his main arteries by millimeters, and he survived the ordeal after surgery, avoiding a lethal scenario. You can read the entire story from Vice Magazine here

    The nail was a lucky miss, but let’s take a look at how this accident could have been avoided. In this example, a simple error could have completely altered the outcome, if the man had removed his hand from the trigger. Even bump action guns still require a suppressed trigger to fire, a safety feature most manufacturers include on their tools. If you feel as if you are going to loose hold of your nail gun or other tool, always take your hand off the trigger. Worst case, a broken tool is better than a life-altering injury.

    A factor that helped to save this man’s life – staying calm and avoiding panic. Panic increases blood flow, which can increase bleeding from open wounds. In this example where a heart was pierced, panicking could have further reduced his ability to breath, leading to hyperventilation. Staying calm and contacting emergency medical services immediately will improve chances of survival, in life threatening situations. Treat for shock while help is on its way.

    As described in the instance above, nail guns are powerful tools, so let’s make sure you are set up for success, which starts with safe handling:

      • Start by knowing your tool and how it functions. Read the owner’s manual and look at warnings listed by the manufacturer.
      • Wear the appropriate safety gear for your job site. Safety glasses should always be worn, regardless of the project. Depending on your line of work, a hardhat, hearing protection, harness or gloves might also be required.
      • ALWAYS keep your tool pointed away from yourself and anyone else, especially when activated. When in doubt, treat your nail gun as you would treat any other firearm.
      • Don’t use a tool that is not functioning properly. Have any broken or damaged tool serviced before trying to use.
      • Do not try to drive fasteners on top of other fasteners. This can lead to misfire or backfire – resulting in injury.

     

    There's no guarantee that injury will not occur when handling your tools – on and off the job site – but practicing safety measures, such as the ones mentioned above, will increase your odds of avoiding injury and staying safe.

    ~ The Nail Gun Depot Team

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  • Choosing An Air Compressor For Pneumatic Tools

    We've talked a lot about pneumatic tools, such as nailers and staple guns, but what about the compressors that bring these tools to life? The air compressor you use can make or break your business, so it makes sense that you want to use a compressor that is durable, reliable and capable of providing the right amount of air pressure to your tool.

    Air compressors range in price, based on a variety of criteria including size, power and available features. Smaller units, such as Senco's PC1010 portable air compressor, whereas larger, more powerful units, such as Rol-Air's 8422HK30 nine horsepower compressor, is quite a bit pricier.

    The first criteria to determine which compressor is right for you - where will it be used? Make sure to choose a compressor with the correct voltage for the space it will be used in. Always operate your electric compressor as close to its source of power as possible. If an extension cord must be used, consider using a heavy duty cord. If electricity is not accessible on the job site, you might find it easier to use a gas powered compressor. Gas powered compressors are generally more powerful as well - which might be useful for heavy duty projects.

    Next, you need to determine the appropriate tank size. Contrary to what some believe, tank size does not affect the amount of air delivered, but it does influence how much the motor runs. Planning to use more than one tool at the same time? You will probably want a compressor with a larger tank. The more tools connected, the more air pressure that is being used. If you want to reduce the amount of strain on the motor, consider a larger tank size. However, remember that a larger tank might reduce portability.

    Some models also come with available features, such as multi-tool use with the Bostitch CAP2060P (replaced by Bostitch BTFP02012), trays and attachments for tools and fasteners with the Bostitch CAP1512-OF, or low operating noise with the Bostitch BTFP02011 (replaced by Bostitch BTFP02012).

    Oil-less or lubricated? Most conventional compressors require regular monitoring of oil levels, which can be a burden if you have multiple people using the same compressor, traveling from job to job. Just as a car, if oil is not replenished, the motor will seize. There is an upside to lubricated air compressors though - they are typically more durable and capable of heavy use. If you are an amateur DIYer, you might find the oil-less compressor more suitable to your needs - if it is only intended for occasional use. Oil-less compressors typically work best with lower volume, less intense use - but don't worry, they still can pack a punch.

     

    Buying a reputable brand, such as Senco, Bostitch or Rol-Air can provide additional peace of mind - and generally brands such as these offer a better warranty.

     
    Want more information about air compressors? Let us answer all of your questions and find the perfect compressor to meet your needs.
     
    ~ The Nail Gun Depot Team
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  • What Are Scrails - And Why Should I Use Them?

    Have you heard of a scrail? Scrails can be driven using most pneumatic nailers, but offer better holding power than a standard nail. These fasteners are driven at a rate twice as fast as collated screws - and eight times faster than bulk. Available in a variety of collations, heads and coatings, the ease and speed of a scrail increases productivity and saves labor cost. 

    Relatively new to the fastener market, scrails, manufactured by Fasco, are available in 20-22 degree plastic strip, 30 degree plastic strip, 15 degree wire coil and 15 degree (90 degree) plastic coil. Just as you would with a traditional nail, you will need to stay within the range of fastener that your nail gun works with - visit the tool manufacturer's specs for nail length and diameter.

     
    Scrails
    Bulk and collated screws commonly feature a Phillip's or Square drive. Scrails on the other hand, are available with Phillip's, Square, Pozidrive and Torx heads. They are also available in a range of heads including flat, composite, combo trim and more. You can choose between fine, coarse and double threads.
     
    Scrail Heads
    Depending on your application, the coating of the scrail is essential. For subfloor, pallet, crating and manufactured housing, a yellow zinc coating is typically recommended. Colored screws for composite lumber are available in brown, cedar, gray and tan. Hot-dipped galvanized coated scrails are recommended for any pressure treated lumber application. If corrosion resistance is required, scrails are also available in 304 and 316 stainless steel.
     
    Scrail Collation
    Odd to look at, scrails have become a revolutionary new item within the fastener industry. These handy fasteners can save time and money for contractors and DIYer's alike.
     
    Ready to start using scrails? Feel free to contact a customer service specialist at Nail Gun Depot to ensure you are ordering the correct product for your application.
     

    ~ The Nail Gun Depot Team

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  • New Tools, New Year

    Welcome back to the Nail Gun Depot blog, we hope your 2013 holiday season was relaxing and enjoyable. With the holidays over, it's back to work for most of us - so let's take a look at some new tools to help you start 2014 with improved productivity.

    We believe it is important to start the year with growth, as we proudly add a new brand to our lineup of quality tools - welcoming 3 PRO to our products page. 3 PRO offers a rapidly growing line of tools that is catching on fast with contractors and DIYers. We now carry three flooring tools by 3PRO, the FSN50 flooring nailer and staple gun, the S9032P flooring stapler and the S9040P floor stapler. All three of these pneumatic flooring tools are easy to use and provide the end user with a durable, competitively priced product. Consider trying out a 3 PRO flooring tool if you are looking for a less costly solution to floor installation - and don't forget, our selection of fasteners will help you complete any project with ease.

    Continuing with product growth and expansion, check out our recently updated lineup of Senco DuraSpin screws, bits and accessories. Building on our existing inventory of fasteners for Senco's DuraSpin screw guns, we are now able to offer a greater selection of DuraSpin screws and bits than ever before. Senco is recognized for providing top quality tools and fasteners, so rest assured, your project will be built to last - whether you are installing drywall or building a new deck! 

    Another exciting development at Nail Gun Depot, look for our ALL-NEW "How-To" page, which is scheduled to launch in early 2014! Our mission at Nail Gun Depot is more than selling tools and fasteners, we want to create an experience for all of our customers - and part of that experience is helping a customer understand how their tool works and projects to use it on. Building a long-term relationship with each of our customers is top priority, which is why we are proud to offer this How-To page as part of our commitment to serving our customer's needs. Learn how your tool works via interactive, manufacturer videos and how-to posts. You can also check out posts that include project ideas, repair tips and tool safety.

    Have an idea for our new "How-To" page? Submit your thoughts to us at sales@nailgundepot.com.

    ~ The Nail Gun Depot Team

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  • Nail Components (Pt 2)

    Welcome to the second part of our series on nail components. Last week, we talked about nail types, shank types and point types. If you missed part-one, you can check it out here. In the second half, we are going to look at finish types and the importance of angle.

    While the shape of the nail is pivotal to its use, you also want to pay careful attention to the finish. The finish of a nail can determine whether or not it can be used outside, the type of surface it works with and its durability.

     

    Nail Finishes

    Bright - This finish is used for your basic hardware nail. There is no coating, it is just plain steel. This finish offers no corrosion resistance, meaning it can not be used on any exterior applications where it will be exposed to precipitation.

    Electro-GalvanizedSimilar to the bright finish, electro-galvanized nails are coated with zinc via an electrical charge. These provide slightly more corrosion resistance than the bright finish, BUT should still not be used for exterior projects that are exposed to weather.

    Hot-Dipped GalvanizedThese nails are dipped in liquid zinc to provide good corrosion resistance. The resulting finish is composed of a clumpy, zinc exterior. These nails can be used for exterior applications.

    Stainless Steel - This finish offers resistance to corrosion for the lifetime of the nail. Stainless is able to be used for exterior projects and works particularly well with wood such as cedar and redwood. It is popular in markets that have a significant amount of moisture in the air.

    Aluminum - This metal offers less durability than stainless, but also boasts a corrosion-free lifespan. It is typically used for applications such as attaching aluminum trims or gutters.

    Copper - Copper, being a more expensive material, is typically only used when fastening to other copper materials. It is used more for appearance than utility.

    Blue Oxidized - This finish is the result of de-greasing and heat cleaning, which leaves the nail with a blue coating. This finish is typically used with plaster.

    Vinyl Coating - Vinyl coated nails provide enhanced holding strength and are easier to drive. The downside to vinyl coating is that these nails are not useable for outdoor or exterior projects.

    Cement Coating - The cement (resin) coating is applied to the nail to improve holding strength and can make the nail easier to drive. It should not be used for applications that will be exposed to weather and precipitation, so exercise caution if using for exterior projects.

    Phosphate Coating - The use of a phosphate coating improves holding strength and provides an excellent surface – for use with paint or putty. The phosphate attracts paint and retains it better than most other nail finishes.

     

    Nail Angle

    The angle of a nail is based on the variation in degree that the nail sits from the vertical (base). The angle of nail required varies from nail gun to nail gun – but typically sits in a range between 15 and 34 degrees – if the nailer is angled. If a nail gun is angled, the manufacturer should list the degree of angle required in the nail gun’s specs.

    From nails to nailers, there are a plethora of choices to select from when choosing the right tools for your project. We hope that this two-part series on nail components will help you in determining which nail works best for your needs.

    We always appreciate feedback and comments. Feel free to reach out to us at sales@nailgundepot.com if you have an idea or request for a future blog post.

     

    Good Luck In Selecting Your Next Nail,

    ~ The Nail Gun Depot Team

     

    P.S. We will be taking a two-week break from blogging during Christmas and the New Year to observe the holidays and enjoy time with friends and family - Our store will remain open during regular business hours. Keep an eye out for our next post on January 7, 2014.

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  • Nail Components (Pt 1)

    We've talked a lot about using nail guns, but what about the nails that go in them? We get questions all of the time asking about the components of a nail. The type? The shank? Point and finish?

    The average person only knows about one type of nail; the simple flat head design with a smooth shank and blunt diamond point. This is the most common style for nails used in everyday construction, but what about other nail types? Let's take a look at some of the variations in nail design and function - but first, let's go over some basic terms that define the structure of a nail.

    A nail is composed of three parts: head (top), shank (body) and point (tip). Size and length will vary depending on the type of job you are working on - your nail gun will tell you which size nails it will work with. Finally, you have the finish of the nail, which represents the nail's exterior - and can come coated (resin), galvanized (dipped) or untreated.

    Now that we know some of the basic terms regarding the structure of a nail, it's time to look at the variations in their structure.

     

    Nail Head Types

    Flathead Nail - This is the most common type of head for a nail. Available in different forms such as full (regular), clipped (reduced head size) and off center (head sits to the side of base), this nail's larger head size offers stronger holding capability.

    Brad & Finish Nails - These nails are typically used for finishing work, such as attaching trim and molding. Having a smaller head means these nails do not have the holding strength of their flathead counterpart, but they are able to fit in tighter places and are less noticeable to the naked eye, after installation.

    Duplex Nail - The duplex nail is intended for temporary use, featuring a double head for easy removal. These nails resemble a push-pin, and are designed to work as a placeholder - before a permanent application has been made.

     

    Nail Shank Types

    Smooth Shank Nail - The smooth shank is the most common shank that can be found on nails. The easiest to produce, this type of shank also provides the least amount of holding strength.

    Ring Shank Nail - The ring design on a shank provides improved holding strength and can be recognized by the threaded rings that run along the body of the nail. Its appearance resembles a smooth body nail running through a spring.

    Screw Shank Nail - A screw design has a body similar to its screw counterpart, but is driven into wood without the traditional screw head. It features a spiral design that covers about 3/4 of the nail's body.

    Spiral Shank Nail - Similar to the screw, this shank spirals the entire body of the nail.

     

    Nail Point Types

    Blunt Point- This is the most common of nail points. It reduces splitting when being driven, which makes it an asset to anyone using a nailer.

    Long Point - This point is mostly used in drywall installation, as it has a long, sharp, needle-like tip that can be driven deep.

    Chisel Point - This type of point is mostly used for heavy duty projects, such as pallet-building and industrial assembly. The chisel tip also helps to avoid splitting.

    Flat point - This point does not have a sharp or jagged edge. It features a smooth point.

    Clinch Point - This point is off center, but is sharp like the chisel. One side of this point is shorter than the other.

    Check back next week for the second half of this two-part series on nail components!

     

    Best Of Luck On Your Next Project,

    ~ The Nail Gun Depot Team

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  • Nail Gun Basics

    Don't let using a nail gun be an intimidating experience. After all, everyone's got to start somewhere. Learn the basics right here at Nail Gun Network.

    Step 1: Choose a Nail Gun

    What type of project are you working on? It will impact your choice or nail gun—also known as a pneumatic nail gun or "nailer". Choose from: a framing nailer; brad nailer for light trim and molding, which uses small nails that won’t split wood; or a trim nailer, for slightly thicker nails than brad nails. Choose the nail gun that's best suited for your application. For most home DIY projects, such as decking and framing, you'll want a framing nail gun. 

    MAX-Users-Edit

    Step 2: Choose a Nail

    Strip or coil? This decision refers to the way the nails are attached to one another or collated, and subsequently, how they're loaded into the tool's magazine. Strip nails come in a paper or plastic strip, while coil nails (example, below) are attached by a wire coil weld. Coil nailers allow for less reloading, as they typically hold more nails. If you're doing a big job or are a contractor, this is the way to go. Most DIYers choose a strip nailer.

    Clipped head or full head? Clipped head nails are just what they sound like, part of the head has been removed. This allows the nails to be collated closer together, which means more nails in the strip and less reloading. The holding power doesn't differ much, however, some coastal states still require full head nails for certain projects. Always check local building codes when building structures.

    WireCoilFramingNails

    Galvanized or not? Galvanized nails are coated to resist rust and corrosion, so if you're completing an outdoor project or something that will be exposed to moisture, galvanized nails offer greater weather resistance. If money isn't an object (but superior corrosion-resistance is, opt for stainless steel nails).

    Step 3: Decide How to Power Your Nail Gun

    Nail guns can be powered by air, electricity, fuel or batteries. When you buy your nail gun you will need to know how it receives power. Most choose an air powered nail gun for its reasonable price point and ample power. However, air powered tools require an air compressor. Your nail gun will be attached to the compressor by a hose and will be either gas powered or electric. 

    Some manufacturers offer air compressor and nailer kits, such as the Bostitch 3-Tool Finish and Trim Kit, below. The nice thing about power tool/compressor combo kits is that they take the confusion out of choosing a nailer, hose and compressor—plus you can get a little more bang for your buck.

    Bostitch Kit

    Step 4: Ready, Load..

    Load your gun according to the instructions. The strip nail guns are similar to loading a stapler. Pull back the magazine, insert the nail strip, and release the magazine to allow tension on the nail strip. To load a coil nail gun, open the magazine (inside there will be an adjustable nail tray). Set the tray for the length of nail that you are using. Insert the nail coil into the magazine. Toward the nose of the tool, you will find a “feed pawl” which guides the nails into the chamber. Be sure the wire and nail heads are aligned with the proper grooves.

    Step 5: Fire!

    Most nail guns require the nose to be pressed against a surface to fire. This is a safety feature so that the gun is not accidentally shot. There are usually two choices for operation: bump fire and sequential. Sequential requires you to pull the trigger each time you want to shoot a nail. Bump fire eliminates the trigger and fires each time the nail gun is pressed up against a surface

    Beyond this, always read the tool manual, do some tests fires into scrap wood, and wear proper safety gear. Now you're on your way to hassle-free nailing!

     
    ~ The Nail Gun Depot Team
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  • How To Choose A Nail Gun For Your Project

    Nail guns are a great addition to a tool arsenal; they speed up a job, drive nails into hard-to-reach areas, and drive smaller nails without bending or breaking them. How do you choose a nail gun for your project? To help you decide, we look at the main nail guns homeowners use:

    Framing Nailer

    A framing nailer is used for larger projects such as fencing, deck building, roof sheathing, sub-flooring, and (of course) framing. Framing nail guns drive some of the larger gauge nails, from about .113" to .131" in diameter with lengths from 1-1/4" long to 3-1/2". Framing nail guns are also excellent for projects involving plaster, as hand hammering can crack and loosen plaster.

    An example of a framing nailer, the Paslode Power Master Plus Pneumatic Nailer

    Finish Nailer

    A finish nailer is a versatile tool, and drives either 15- or 16-gauge nails. They are used for smaller projects than framing nails, such as crown molding, baseboards, cabinets, chair rails, decorative trim, millwork, and hardwood flooring. Finish nails are sturdy enough to hold these larger pieces, but small enough that they can be puttied over for the finished product.

    FinishPro42XP

    Brad Nailer

    A brad nailer drives even smaller, 18-gauge brad nails,. Brad nailers are used for smaller trim, for which larger nails might split the wood. Using a hammer to drive brad nails can be frustrating due to their ultra-thin pins that can bend easily. This is why a nail gun is favorable when working on an ongoing project.

    Hitachi NT50AE2

     

    Gas-powered Nail Guns

    Gas-powered nail guns use a fuel cell with a rechargeable battery. This type of nailer does not require an air compressor, hose or cord, which offers some convenience. It's considered a more costly way to power a nail gun, as opposed to a pneumatic tool.

    Air-Powered or Pneumatic Nailers

    This is the most popular choice for power fastening tools, as it is an affordable, powerful and convenient way to power your nail gun. This type of nailer uses compressed air to drive nails. If you choose a pneumatic tool, make sure that the air requirement for the nail gun and the compressor match - ensuring your nail gun will work properly.

    Bostitch Pneumatic Finish Nailer

    Don't forget to consider the brand when making your decision. Trusted brands such as Stanley Bostitch, Hitachi, Senco or Paslode will usually lead to less jams and repairs. 


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  • How To Maintain A Paslode Cordless Framing Nailer

    Maintaining and cleaning a cordless nailer takes about 15 minutes, once every 6 months or 50,000 nails—that’s all. To keep a Paslode cordless framing nailer in prime condition, watch the step-by-step Paslode video.

     

    You'll Need the following:

    A lint-free rag is important to keep particles form entering the tool. Always practice safety when cleaning your cordless finish nailer. 

    Be sure to remove battery, fuel, and nails from the tool prior to cleaning. 

    PaslodeCorldessFramingNailerVideo

    Maintenance Steps

    Clean - Grab your tool cleaner. Begin removing dirt and residue from the filter, cylinder head assembly and combustion chamber.

    Oil - Oil your motor assembly sleeve, seal rings and combustion chamber.

    Reassemble - Make sure that all screws are tight. Loose screws can result in personal injury or malfunction. For example, a loose nose could cause your nailer to fire multiple nails.

    Test - Make sure everything is in working order. It's normal for the tool to release a small amount of smoke. If something's malfunctioning, however, consult the product manual or contact Paslode Tech Support.

    CordlessFramingNailerVideoPic

    Pro Tips:

    • Don’t forget to check the expiration date on the fuel cells. An expired fuel cell can affect cordless nailer performance.
    • These steps and video are for Paslode cordless framing nailers, specifically the CF325-Li (replaced by thCF325XP Cordless Framing Nailer). Always consult your tool's specific manual.

     

    ~ The Nail Gun Depot Team

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  • How To Use A Framing Nail Gun Or Nailer

    Strip Nailers
    To use a strip nailer, pull back the magazine follower to prepare for loading. Insert the proper nails into the nailer's magazine - see manufacturer specs for fastener information.
    Keep in mind, some nail guns load from the top, while others load from the rear.
    After inserting nails, release the magazine follower to allow for tension on the nails. Now, you will want to attach your air line to the tool.
    To fire, most nailers will require the safety to be depressed against a surface, while the trigger is pulled at the same time.

    Two modes of operation are available, bump fire and sequential operation. Bump firing will eliminate the need to release and pull the trigger after each shot.

    Most nailers also feature an adjustable depth of drive. This allows for flush driving or countersink.

     

    Coil Nailers

    To use a coil nailer, open the magazine basket and front door latch. Inside the basket is an adjustable nail tray. Be sure to set the tray for the length of fastener you are using, to allow for optimal performance.

    Insert nails into the magazine basket. Toward the nose of the tool, you will find a feed pawl. The feed pawl guides nails into the chamber. Be sure to align the collation wire and nail head into the proper grooves.

    Close the magazine basket and door latch, attach your air line, and follow the same steps listed above to fire.

    Always consult the manufacturer's operating manual for exact instructions detailing the specific tool you are using.

     
    ~ The Nail Gun Depot Team
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