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Tag Archives: nail guns
  • USA Assembled - The History Of Paslode Tools

    We're less than a week from July 4th, and in the spirit of celebrating Independence Day, we're kicking off a three-part series on the Nail Gun Network, honoring some of the great tool, fastener and compressor manufacturers that either manufacture and/or assemble their products in the United States.
    Paslode
    To kick things off, we start with a founding father in pneumatic nailing - Paslode. The following is a condensed history of the Paslode brand, taken directly from ITW Paslode's website:

    "Paslode's history for innovation began in 1935 when company founder, industrialist J.W. Leslie, felt a key to his company's (Signode Steel) success was demonstrating the product. Unfortunately, his sales representatives wasted time making cold calls on prospects that might not have a use for Signode products. To solve the problem, Mr. Leslie founded a subsidiary company to market shipping room supplies, with the additional intention of scouting potential leads for Signode representatives.

    He called the company Paslode, to describe the product line: Packing, Shipping and Loading Devices. Paslode representatives went door-to-door, identifying likely Signode prospects. The representatives of course also sold Paslode products: stapling hammers and lightweight staplers too.

    Paslode introduced the very first pneumatic tool -- a light duty upholstery tacker - in 1959. This simple tool eventually changed the direction of the company. Paslode's success accelerated the development of a full line of pneumatic tools. Shortly thereafter, Paslode produced the first commercially accepted pneumatic nailer, The Gun-Nailer™, providing the construction industry with a cost-efficient way to increase productivity and reduce worker fatigue.

    Paslode continued to lead the way in the evolution of power fastening with the introduction of its Impulse nailer, the world's first cordless power nailer. Still considered the industry standard by many, the Impulse features a patented combustion motor that provides freedom from compressors and cords - allowing greater safety, maneuverability and versatility.

    An enhanced pneumatic nailer, the PowerMaster™, was introduced in 1995. With its lightweight design and offering more power per pound than competing models, the PowerMaster defined an entirely new generation of pneumatic nailers.

    Addressing the needs of the residential construction, roofing, furniture, pallet and crating, and manufactured housing industries over the years, Paslode has become an industry "staple." Today, Paslode's latest innovations include powerful, lightweight and efficient tools that are designed for all-day comfort and use."

    Sticking true to their guns, Paslode still manufactures a majority of their tools in the United States to this day.
    Wishing A Happy July 4th To All,
    ~ The Nail Gun Depot Team
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  • Choosing An Air Compressor For Pneumatic Tools

    We've talked a lot about pneumatic tools, such as nailers and staple guns, but what about the compressors that bring these tools to life? The air compressor you use can make or break your business, so it makes sense that you want to use a compressor that is durable, reliable and capable of providing the right amount of air pressure to your tool.

    Air compressors range in price, based on a variety of criteria including size, power and available features. Smaller units, such as Senco's PC1010 portable air compressor, whereas larger, more powerful units, such as Rol-Air's 8422HK30 nine horsepower compressor, is quite a bit pricier.

    The first criteria to determine which compressor is right for you - where will it be used? Make sure to choose a compressor with the correct voltage for the space it will be used in. Always operate your electric compressor as close to its source of power as possible. If an extension cord must be used, consider using a heavy duty cord. If electricity is not accessible on the job site, you might find it easier to use a gas powered compressor. Gas powered compressors are generally more powerful as well - which might be useful for heavy duty projects.

    Next, you need to determine the appropriate tank size. Contrary to what some believe, tank size does not affect the amount of air delivered, but it does influence how much the motor runs. Planning to use more than one tool at the same time? You will probably want a compressor with a larger tank. The more tools connected, the more air pressure that is being used. If you want to reduce the amount of strain on the motor, consider a larger tank size. However, remember that a larger tank might reduce portability.

    Some models also come with available features, such as multi-tool use with the Bostitch CAP2060P (replaced by Bostitch BTFP02012), trays and attachments for tools and fasteners with the Bostitch CAP1512-OF, or low operating noise with the Bostitch BTFP02011 (replaced by Bostitch BTFP02012).

    Oil-less or lubricated? Most conventional compressors require regular monitoring of oil levels, which can be a burden if you have multiple people using the same compressor, traveling from job to job. Just as a car, if oil is not replenished, the motor will seize. There is an upside to lubricated air compressors though - they are typically more durable and capable of heavy use. If you are an amateur DIYer, you might find the oil-less compressor more suitable to your needs - if it is only intended for occasional use. Oil-less compressors typically work best with lower volume, less intense use - but don't worry, they still can pack a punch.

     

    Buying a reputable brand, such as Senco, Bostitch or Rol-Air can provide additional peace of mind - and generally brands such as these offer a better warranty.

     
    Want more information about air compressors? Let us answer all of your questions and find the perfect compressor to meet your needs.
     
    ~ The Nail Gun Depot Team
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  • New Tools, New Year

    Welcome back to the Nail Gun Depot blog, we hope your 2013 holiday season was relaxing and enjoyable. With the holidays over, it's back to work for most of us - so let's take a look at some new tools to help you start 2014 with improved productivity.

    We believe it is important to start the year with growth, as we proudly add a new brand to our lineup of quality tools - welcoming 3 PRO to our products page. 3 PRO offers a rapidly growing line of tools that is catching on fast with contractors and DIYers. We now carry three flooring tools by 3PRO, the FSN50 flooring nailer and staple gun, the S9032P flooring stapler and the S9040P floor stapler. All three of these pneumatic flooring tools are easy to use and provide the end user with a durable, competitively priced product. Consider trying out a 3 PRO flooring tool if you are looking for a less costly solution to floor installation - and don't forget, our selection of fasteners will help you complete any project with ease.

    Continuing with product growth and expansion, check out our recently updated lineup of Senco DuraSpin screws, bits and accessories. Building on our existing inventory of fasteners for Senco's DuraSpin screw guns, we are now able to offer a greater selection of DuraSpin screws and bits than ever before. Senco is recognized for providing top quality tools and fasteners, so rest assured, your project will be built to last - whether you are installing drywall or building a new deck! 

    Another exciting development at Nail Gun Depot, look for our ALL-NEW "How-To" page, which is scheduled to launch in early 2014! Our mission at Nail Gun Depot is more than selling tools and fasteners, we want to create an experience for all of our customers - and part of that experience is helping a customer understand how their tool works and projects to use it on. Building a long-term relationship with each of our customers is top priority, which is why we are proud to offer this How-To page as part of our commitment to serving our customer's needs. Learn how your tool works via interactive, manufacturer videos and how-to posts. You can also check out posts that include project ideas, repair tips and tool safety.

    Have an idea for our new "How-To" page? Submit your thoughts to us at sales@nailgundepot.com.

    ~ The Nail Gun Depot Team

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  • Nail Components (Pt 2)

    Welcome to the second part of our series on nail components. Last week, we talked about nail types, shank types and point types. If you missed part-one, you can check it out here. In the second half, we are going to look at finish types and the importance of angle.

    While the shape of the nail is pivotal to its use, you also want to pay careful attention to the finish. The finish of a nail can determine whether or not it can be used outside, the type of surface it works with and its durability.

     

    Nail Finishes

    Bright - This finish is used for your basic hardware nail. There is no coating, it is just plain steel. This finish offers no corrosion resistance, meaning it can not be used on any exterior applications where it will be exposed to precipitation.

    Electro-GalvanizedSimilar to the bright finish, electro-galvanized nails are coated with zinc via an electrical charge. These provide slightly more corrosion resistance than the bright finish, BUT should still not be used for exterior projects that are exposed to weather.

    Hot-Dipped GalvanizedThese nails are dipped in liquid zinc to provide good corrosion resistance. The resulting finish is composed of a clumpy, zinc exterior. These nails can be used for exterior applications.

    Stainless Steel - This finish offers resistance to corrosion for the lifetime of the nail. Stainless is able to be used for exterior projects and works particularly well with wood such as cedar and redwood. It is popular in markets that have a significant amount of moisture in the air.

    Aluminum - This metal offers less durability than stainless, but also boasts a corrosion-free lifespan. It is typically used for applications such as attaching aluminum trims or gutters.

    Copper - Copper, being a more expensive material, is typically only used when fastening to other copper materials. It is used more for appearance than utility.

    Blue Oxidized - This finish is the result of de-greasing and heat cleaning, which leaves the nail with a blue coating. This finish is typically used with plaster.

    Vinyl Coating - Vinyl coated nails provide enhanced holding strength and are easier to drive. The downside to vinyl coating is that these nails are not useable for outdoor or exterior projects.

    Cement Coating - The cement (resin) coating is applied to the nail to improve holding strength and can make the nail easier to drive. It should not be used for applications that will be exposed to weather and precipitation, so exercise caution if using for exterior projects.

    Phosphate Coating - The use of a phosphate coating improves holding strength and provides an excellent surface – for use with paint or putty. The phosphate attracts paint and retains it better than most other nail finishes.

     

    Nail Angle

    The angle of a nail is based on the variation in degree that the nail sits from the vertical (base). The angle of nail required varies from nail gun to nail gun – but typically sits in a range between 15 and 34 degrees – if the nailer is angled. If a nail gun is angled, the manufacturer should list the degree of angle required in the nail gun’s specs.

    From nails to nailers, there are a plethora of choices to select from when choosing the right tools for your project. We hope that this two-part series on nail components will help you in determining which nail works best for your needs.

    We always appreciate feedback and comments. Feel free to reach out to us at sales@nailgundepot.com if you have an idea or request for a future blog post.

     

    Good Luck In Selecting Your Next Nail,

    ~ The Nail Gun Depot Team

     

    P.S. We will be taking a two-week break from blogging during Christmas and the New Year to observe the holidays and enjoy time with friends and family - Our store will remain open during regular business hours. Keep an eye out for our next post on January 7, 2014.

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  • Nail Components (Pt 1)

    We've talked a lot about using nail guns, but what about the nails that go in them? We get questions all of the time asking about the components of a nail. The type? The shank? Point and finish?

    The average person only knows about one type of nail; the simple flat head design with a smooth shank and blunt diamond point. This is the most common style for nails used in everyday construction, but what about other nail types? Let's take a look at some of the variations in nail design and function - but first, let's go over some basic terms that define the structure of a nail.

    A nail is composed of three parts: head (top), shank (body) and point (tip). Size and length will vary depending on the type of job you are working on - your nail gun will tell you which size nails it will work with. Finally, you have the finish of the nail, which represents the nail's exterior - and can come coated (resin), galvanized (dipped) or untreated.

    Now that we know some of the basic terms regarding the structure of a nail, it's time to look at the variations in their structure.

     

    Nail Head Types

    Flathead Nail - This is the most common type of head for a nail. Available in different forms such as full (regular), clipped (reduced head size) and off center (head sits to the side of base), this nail's larger head size offers stronger holding capability.

    Brad & Finish Nails - These nails are typically used for finishing work, such as attaching trim and molding. Having a smaller head means these nails do not have the holding strength of their flathead counterpart, but they are able to fit in tighter places and are less noticeable to the naked eye, after installation.

    Duplex Nail - The duplex nail is intended for temporary use, featuring a double head for easy removal. These nails resemble a push-pin, and are designed to work as a placeholder - before a permanent application has been made.

     

    Nail Shank Types

    Smooth Shank Nail - The smooth shank is the most common shank that can be found on nails. The easiest to produce, this type of shank also provides the least amount of holding strength.

    Ring Shank Nail - The ring design on a shank provides improved holding strength and can be recognized by the threaded rings that run along the body of the nail. Its appearance resembles a smooth body nail running through a spring.

    Screw Shank Nail - A screw design has a body similar to its screw counterpart, but is driven into wood without the traditional screw head. It features a spiral design that covers about 3/4 of the nail's body.

    Spiral Shank Nail - Similar to the screw, this shank spirals the entire body of the nail.

     

    Nail Point Types

    Blunt Point- This is the most common of nail points. It reduces splitting when being driven, which makes it an asset to anyone using a nailer.

    Long Point - This point is mostly used in drywall installation, as it has a long, sharp, needle-like tip that can be driven deep.

    Chisel Point - This type of point is mostly used for heavy duty projects, such as pallet-building and industrial assembly. The chisel tip also helps to avoid splitting.

    Flat point - This point does not have a sharp or jagged edge. It features a smooth point.

    Clinch Point - This point is off center, but is sharp like the chisel. One side of this point is shorter than the other.

    Check back next week for the second half of this two-part series on nail components!

     

    Best Of Luck On Your Next Project,

    ~ The Nail Gun Depot Team

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  • How To Protect Yourself When Using A Nail Gun

    The first and most important rule to nail gun safety, always read the operator's manual before using a tool. This will give you an understanding of the tool itself, including parts, operation, as well as any special circumstances associated with operation.

    Once you have read and understood the manual, make sure that you put on OSHA required “Z87” safety goggles. Depending on the conditions with which you are working, make sure you utilize other personal safety equipment, such as a hard hat and hearing protection.

    Next, remember to always keep the tool pointed away from yourself and others, especially when it's connected to air - also remember to keep hands and other body parts away from the nose of the nail gun. Always store idle tools out of reach from minors.

    It's also important to note that you should never use a tool that leaks air or needs repair. This includes not running a pneumatic tool over the recommended air pressure.

    Never load a fastener with the trigger or safety element depressed - and do not drive fasteners on top of other fasteners, or at too steep of an angle. Always be careful when loading fasteners.

    For any additional information, please refer to the owner's manual of your tool.
     
    ~ The Nail Gun Depot Team
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  • How A Nail Gun Works

    Ever wonder how your nail gun works? Learn the fundamentals of nailer operation, getting a behind the scenes look at the engineering marvels that power these game changing tools.

    The most common type of nail gun is pneumatic, or air-powered. Compressed air is supplied via a separate air compressor, which is powered by either electricity or gasoline. The air from the compressor is pushed through a hose into a holding area in the nail gun; this is called an air reservoir. The typical pneumatic nail gun uses a piston with a long shaft attached to it called a driver. The driver is what makes contact with the head of the nail and forces it into the work surface. The piston is located in a cylinder inside the main body of the nail gun. The air in the reservoir is held in place by a valve, which is located above the piston.

    Before the trigger is pulled, the air pressure below the piston is greater than the air pressure above it, which keeps the piston at the top of the cylinder. When the trigger of the nailer is depressed, the valve opens, forcing air into the cylinder and making the pressure above the piston greater than below it. This drives the piston down and hammers the nail. When the trigger is released, the air inside the nail gun around the cylinder is vented through the small holes drilled toward the bottom half of the cylinder. This makes the pressure below the piston greater than above it, and forces the piston back up to its starting position. Simultaneously, the valve opens back up and forces the used air through an exhaust port in the top of the nailer.

     
    ~ The Nail Gun Depot Team
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  • How To Use A Framing Nail Gun Or Nailer

    Strip Nailers
    To use a strip nailer, pull back the magazine follower to prepare for loading. Insert the proper nails into the nailer's magazine - see manufacturer specs for fastener information.
    Keep in mind, some nail guns load from the top, while others load from the rear.
    After inserting nails, release the magazine follower to allow for tension on the nails. Now, you will want to attach your air line to the tool.
    To fire, most nailers will require the safety to be depressed against a surface, while the trigger is pulled at the same time.

    Two modes of operation are available, bump fire and sequential operation. Bump firing will eliminate the need to release and pull the trigger after each shot.

    Most nailers also feature an adjustable depth of drive. This allows for flush driving or countersink.

     

    Coil Nailers

    To use a coil nailer, open the magazine basket and front door latch. Inside the basket is an adjustable nail tray. Be sure to set the tray for the length of fastener you are using, to allow for optimal performance.

    Insert nails into the magazine basket. Toward the nose of the tool, you will find a feed pawl. The feed pawl guides nails into the chamber. Be sure to align the collation wire and nail head into the proper grooves.

    Close the magazine basket and door latch, attach your air line, and follow the same steps listed above to fire.

    Always consult the manufacturer's operating manual for exact instructions detailing the specific tool you are using.

     
    ~ The Nail Gun Depot Team
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  • Who Is Senco?

    Founded in 1947, Senco Brands (formerly known as Senco Products and Sencorp) is known for its innovation and reliability. Based in Cincinnati, Senco products include a comprehensive collection of compressors, nailers, staplers, screw guns and other power fastening tools. The company is among the last remaining large-scale manufacturers to produce fasteners on U.S. soil, generating more than 80% of their nails and staples in the United States.
     
    Senco History
    Senco produces tools designed for professional contractors, remodelers, furniture builders and industrial manufacturers - with distribution outlets worldwide, including Nail Gun Depot, also located in Cincinnati. Awards and recognition include: "Tools of the Trade" Editor's Choice Award (2010), "Building Products" MVP Award (2010), "Handy" Innovation Award (2010), and "This Old House" Top 100 (2010).
     
    Senco History
    Isn't it about time you owned a Senco?
     
    ~ The Nail Gun Depot Team
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