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Tag Archives: nailer
  • DIY Tips: How To Install Flawless Drywall

    An important step in nearly any major home renovation project? Installing drywall. Knowing how to do it yourself can save time and money. We offer you a few tips and discuss the best tools for the job, here on the Nail Gun Network.

    Fasteners First

    Most new construction projects mandate the use of drywall screws when installing drywall. Screws are certainly ideal, as their thread provides better holding power, especially in climates where wood is prone to expand and contract regularly. In some circumstances, drywall nails can be used to hang wallboard, but beware; over time, nail popping and other imperfections to the wall might occur as the wood frame expands and contracts.

    For long-term quality, we recommend using a screw gun and collated drywall screws for a fast, cost-effective drywall installation. Two competitive screw fastening systems, Senco DuraSpin and Simpson Quik Drive, offer best-in-class performance.

    DuraspinDrywallAttachment

    Another benefit to using screws over nails for drywall installation is that it generally takes fewer screws to complete the project. Pro Tip: Most drywall screws require a Phillips head drive.

    Even for beginners, drywall installation is relatively easy to pick up. Just pay careful attention to the following:

    Prepare for Installation

    Be certain to consult your local building code before beginning drywall installation, as different regions have different requirements. Beyond building code, don't fall victim to silly, yet expensive errors. Gather all of your tools, and don't forget the small one. For instance, have a tape measure handy to maintain straight lines.

    As damp wood dries out, it can lead to popping of fasteners and splitting at seams. Make sure the lumber you are fastening drywall board to is within an acceptable range of moisture content (less than 19 percent by most standards).

    Make a Flawless Application

    Don't overlook sagging panels, particularly when installing a ceiling. Make sure to drive extra screws into place while pressing firmly on the loose board. In some extreme cases, an additional brace or bracket may be required to guarantee a firm fit. Likewise, watch for bulging at your vertical seams. If the drywall board swells at the seam once it's been taped and sealed, it may require sanding. You can prevent this issue by ensuring there is no gap between drywall boards during installation.

    Senco DuraSpin Drywall

    Don't Take the Easy Route

    Use a corner guard versus drywall tape and spackle. A corner guard will hold up better in the long run and is typically easier to work with than tape. You should also mark your studs and joists prior to installation of a drywall board. This will help improve the accuracy of your drive and will prevent additional repair work in problem areas.

    Watch for Imperfections

    Don't ignore bubbles, streaks, splits or other noticeable imperfections in drywall tape as it is laid. If air is allowed between the tape and base, it will lead to separation later on. Tape that is not secured properly can eventually peel and will require repair and repainting. In areas where warm and cold air are allowed to converge regularly, eventual loosening and separation of tape from the drywall base is almost inevitable.

    Quikdrive Attachment

    Use the Proper Depth

    Depending on the thickness of the board, determine the appropriate screw length and depth adjustment for your screw gun. Driving too deep can cause noticeable divets in the drywall. Driving too short leaves the screw's head protruding. If installed properly, the screw's head should sit slightly below the drywall surface, leaving just enough room for compound to smooth the surface.

    To recap, make sure your framing is dry, mark your studs and joists for accurate drive locations, hold the drywall board firmly against the wood frame while fastening in place, line up boards for accuracy, scan and repair imperfections, and enjoy.

    ~ The Nail Gun Depot Team

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  • Nail Gun Depot's Most Memorable Blog Posts Of 2014

    We're finally here - the end of 2014. A time to celebrate, reflect and look toward the future. What better way to capture the essence of 2014 at Nail Gun Depot, than to take a look at some of the Nail Gun Network's most influential blog posts of the year. Take a second to check out some of our most popular posts of 2014!
    BeA Upholstery Stapler
    NGD's Top Picks: Hall of "Frame"
    1. How To Install Hardwood Floors: Perfect for the first-timer or budding expert, get start-to-finish tips for installing hardwood flooring. Learn which tools work best for the job and what it takes to lay beautiful new floors.
    2. Choosing An Air Compressor For Pneumatic Tools: If you use a pneumatic (air-powered) tool, you must use an air compressor to make it operate - but do you have the right air compressor for your tool? Find out in this blog.
    3. NGD Construction & Manufacturing Tool Index: For the DIYer or casual woodworker, find out which tools power the fastening industry. From construction and remodeling to manufacturing - we've got you covered.
    4. American Made Fasteners - A Senco Tradition: Not many manufacturers can boast the phrase "Made In America." At Senco, these words represent more than 80% of the fasteners they produce. Learn more about what makes Senco unique.
    5. How To Build & Install Your Own Kitchen Cabinets: Getting the kitchen cabinets you dream about can be more cost effective than one might think. Find out what you need to know to get the job done right.
    STAFDA Logo
    Viewer's Choice: Most Popular
    1. What's The Difference Between Brad Nailers & Finish Nailers?: An age-old question, get the answers you need on the Nail Gun Network.
    2. What's The Difference Between A Floor Nailer & Flooring Stapler?: Don't use the right tool for the wrong job. Discover which flooring tool is best for your application with Nail Gun Depot.
    3. What Type Of Nail Is Correct For My Application?: Get the inside scoop on which nail you need for your project. From framing to finishing, we've got an answer for everyone.
    4. The Nail Gun Buyer's Guide: Shopping for a nail gun? Maybe you aren't familiar with what's out there. Find out which nailer is the right one for you.
    5. How To Choose The Right Upholstery Stapler: If you work with upholstery, an upholstery stapler is a must-have tool in your arsenal. In this article, find out which features are best for different upholstery applications.
    Nail Gun Network Logo
    And with that, we conclude our last post of 2014. Don't worry, we're only taking a break from blogging for the next two weeks - making time to celebrate the holidays with friends and family. Look for an all-new Nail Gun Network post January 6, 2015!
    ~ The Nail Gun Depot Team
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  • New Tools On Nail Gun Depot

    Want to stay updated on what's new in the tool and fastener industry? As part of our commitment to providing the latest and greatest in power fastening tools, Nail Gun Depot is excited to announce the following recently launched tools, now on NGD.
    Fein ASCS6.3
    Let's start with an innovative - the first of its kind - cordless screw gun motor for QuikDrive, powered by Fein. The Fein ASCS6.3 cordless motor for QuikDrive auto-feed screw fastening systems is compatible with ALL QuikDrive auto-feed attachments, thanks to a pre-installed QuikDrive adapter - bringing a whole new level of compatibility to the QuikDrive family of screw guns. An 18V Li-Ion battery powers the system, eliminating the need for power cords and electrical outlets on the job site. Drive more than 600, 3" deck screws per battery charge. A high-output, brushless EC motor runs up to 266 in/lb-feet, featuring an efficient and maintenance-free design. To top this package off, the Fein ASCS6.3 includes a three-year warranty on the motor and batteries, when registering your tool online.
    QuikDrive PRO300S
    Another addition to the QuikDrive lineup, be sure to check out the QuikDrive PRO300M25K wood decking kit. Just in time to finish up your deck building project before the winter, the PRO300M25K drives special 1-1/2" to 3" collated Deck-Drive screws into wood deck surfaces. The PRO300SM25K kit includes the QuikDrive PRO300S auto-feed decking attachment, an extension for stand up driving, a decking nose clip for consistent screw placement, a quiver for keeping screws at your fingertips, rugged tool case, and Makita screw driver motor. Item includes a manufacturer's lifetime warranty.
    Senco SCN63LDXP
    Moving to a tool for specialized use, Senco has launched the SCN63LDXP structural foam insulation nailer, capable of driving 15 degree, 2-3/8" to 2-1/2" wire coil framing nails. Designed specifically for the installation of continuous structural foam insulation panels, the SCN63LDXP Coil Nailer drives nails through up to 1" thick foam insulation panels. The Senco SCN63LDXP features a long drive lock out, ensuring the proper seating of a nail head - through the foam - against the substrate. The unique safety foot guide ensures proper alignment and reduces damage to the foam surface when fasteners are driven. The SCN63LDXP fastening system reduces installation time and improves productivity on the job site or for in-plant operations. Additional features on this tool include 360 degree adjustable exhaust, tool-free depth of drive adjustment, comfort grip, adjustable nail canister, e-z load design, debris shield and a five-year limited warranty from Senco. Please note this tool is to ONLY be used to install continuous foam insulation with a foam thickness of up to 1" deep - NEVER use on bare wood, metal or other hard surfaces. The drive blade will extend beyond the safety element in the actuated position. This tool is rated for Atlas ThermalStar LCi-SS insulation.
    Free Paslode Car Charger
    Last, but certainly not least, be sure to check out our Paslode Halloween Spooktacular, where you get a free car charger adapter on qualifying Paslode cordless finish and trim tools.
    ~ The Nail Gun Depot Team
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  • Nail Guns - Past To Present

    Nail guns are pivotal to the construction, renovation and manufacturing industries. Without them, production time would increase significantly - and cost to manufacture would go up, but how did these tools come to exist? And how have they progressed over the last 50+ years? Instead of looking at new tools, this week let's step into the past - and see the nailers (and brands) that paved the way for the pneumatic and cordless tools we have today.
     
    We start in the early 1950's, an era known in the United States for post-war prosperity. Service men were home, and were using technology from the battlefield to improve the quality of everyday life during peacetime. With American suburbs popping up sporadically (and fast), home builders needed something more than the hammer and nail to keep up with demand. Likewise, a group of men discovered that the technology behind their machine guns from WWII could be applied to a pneumatic powered tool, the nail gun. Pneumatic staplers were introduced long before the nailer became popular, although both tools run using similar principals of operation.
     
    Senco Pinner Ad from the 1950's
     
    Brands including Paslode, Bostitch and Senco were quick to adopt the technology - although many credit Paslode with developing and launching the first successful pneumatic nailer in the 1970's, the Charger SK-312. The type of fastener that each nailer ran also progressed over time, as new technology such as paper tape strip nails (and other forms of collated fasteners) became available. As time and technology advanced, we eventually saw the release of cordless nailers - otherwise known as battery or gas powered nail guns.
     

    What's next on the horizon for nail gun technology? How can we improve on the tools and fasteners we use today? These are questions that constantly make their way through the research and development labs at these and other manufacturers. Despite the field of work, everyone has their own preference of nail gun manufacturer. While we don't favor one brand to another, Nail Gun Depot offers the best selection of all major nailer and stapler manufacturers. 

     ~ The Nail Gun Depot Team

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  • The Nail Gun Buyer's Guide

    If you've come to the Nail Gun Depot, chances are you know what a nail gun is, what it does, and how it is used. Nailers come in a variety of shapes and sizes, designed to fulfill tasks that range from framing to finishing to flooring - depending on the user's needs. With a variety of options available, which tool is right for you? Find out the features you need, to take on the projects you want to build, right here.

     

    Types of Nail Guns

    From top-to-bottom, the largest of the nail gun family is the framing nailer. Framing nailers are built to tackle large jobs that require heavy duty fasteners (nails) - such as framing, fencing and pallet building. The industries that benefit most from this type of tool include home-building, construction and manufacturing. Similar to the framing nailer, roofing nailers are almost identical in appearance, however these nail guns are designed specifically to fastening roofing shingles.

    For projects that are a bit less intense, finish nailers are recommended for jobs such as door and window trim, paneling, baseboard, casing, crown molding, furniture, shelving and cabinetry. A close relative to finish nail guns, brad nailers drive an even smaller - brad - nail, and are designed for small trim work and furniture repair. Typically, using a brad nail gun will prevent the need for wood putty to cover up a hole where the fastener has been driven - but these nailers can only be used on lighter-duty projects, since the fastener is not as large as a finish nail. Last but not least, a pin nailer might be your best option for crafting or small trim projects, such as cabinet doors and bird house building. For anyone in renovation or remodeling, having a good finish and brad nailer is key to success.

    Designed specifically for hardwood and laminate floor installation, floor nailers are the last of the commonplace nail guns that most contractors or DIYer's will require. These nailers are built to install a variety of hardwood floor sizes and thicknesses. Typically activated with a mallet, floor nailers are only built for flooring applications. 

     

    Pneumatic or Cordless Nailer?

    The age old debate between contractors, do I want a cordless nailer or a pneumatic, air-powered nail gun? Most heavy-duty nail gun users swear by pneumatic tools, as they are generally a bit more reliable and do not require re-charging on the job site. The downside to a pneumatic tool, it requires the use of an air compressor. For workshop woodworkers, using nailers such as finish, brad and pin models, a small compressor will be more than capable. For heavy-duty, high-intensity use on a construction site, look to a larger compressor, as it has a larger tank and is capable of providing enough air-pressure for larger tools - including framing nailers.

    If you choose a cordless nail gun, you will need to keep a battery charger handy to keep your tool running - once the battery wears down. Cordless framing nailers also require a fuel cell to provide the necessary pressure to drive a fastener. The benefit to a cordless tool, you can reach beyond the length of an air hose and can get into tighter, hard to reach areas. You also eliminate the need for an air compressor with a battery-powered nailing tool. This is generally the appeal that makes these types of tools desirable to DIY builders.

     

    Nail Gun Features

    You'll more than likely encounter some - or all - of the following terms, when comparing nailers. One of the most important features you will want to look for, an adjustable depth of drive lets you select how far you want your nail (or other fastener) driven into the object you are fastening. Another option to look for, directional exhaust plates allow you to select the direct your tool shoots it's exhaust - this feature is particularly beneficial in dusty areas. Last, but not least, you will also want to be sure your nailer has a jam clearing feature - to avoid lost time and/or costly repairs if/when your tool jams.

    Depending on the job your are working on, pay attention to features such as trigger size (if you wear gloves while working), easy adjustment for different nail or fastener sizes, and a rugged exterior design to handle the projects you throw at your nailer.

    Keep an eye out for the length of warranty offered by a manufacturer. Most brands will come with a one-year limited warranty, but certain tools go above and beyond - such as Senco's XP (XtremePro) line of nailers that include a five-year limited warranty, or Bostitch's seven-year limited warranty that is offered on select tools.

    ~ The Nail Gun Depot Team

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  • Getting Ready For The Holidays

    The holiday season is now in full-swing, so what are you doing to make merry this year? Depending on where you live, it's probably too cold to work outdoors (unless absolutely necessary) - which means it's the perfect time to get projects done around the house, in preparation for visiting friends and family. You might not have time to renovate the entire bathroom or put in a new kitchen, but consider these simple weekend projects that can spruce up your home - and even add value.

    Add a chair rail in the dining room:

    The dining room is one of the busiest rooms in many households during the holidays. Between family dinners and holiday parties, it's certain to see a lot of traffic from your guests.

    Installing a chair rail can serve more than one purpose in your home - it not only adds detail to the room, it also helps to protect your walls from scrapes and scratches. Using a Brad Nail Gun can help you complete this project with ease. Depending on the size of your dining room, installation can be completed in a relatively short amount of time, leaving your room with an added detail that improves its form and function.

    Tip: Make sure the rail is level before attaching. This is a simple step that is often overlooked, but can save time and money in the long run. If your home has crown molding, try to match the color and style of the rail for continuity.

    Redecorate with reupholstered furniture:

    Whether you're sick of that beat up coffee table, or just need more pizzazz in your home, creating an upholstered ottoman, from a salvaged pallet, is an easy weekend project. It's a little bit carpentry and a little bit upholstery. The biggest benefit in creating your own upholstered coffee table (or dog lounger) is that it's custom - you choose the fabric and the details. Inspiration can come from a photo. It can be as simple as that.

    For step by step instruction, Shelly Leer of ModHomeEc (soon to be Home Room) breaks it down from start to finish in her guest post: "How To Build & Upholster Your Own Salvage Pallet Ottoman". Be sure to pay careful attention to the way she uses her BeA 71/16-436LN long nose upholstery stapler.

    Build a new mantel for the fireplace:

    This might be a bit harder for the average DIYer, but can add tons of character to your home if completed properly. If you don't have a fireplace, you can improvise by building shelving to display decorations and other knickknacks.

    Design the mantel to fit your style and character - there are a lot of sites online that can fuel your inspiration. Once you have selected the perfect design for your home, plan to invest at least five to ten hours (or more) into this project.

    A finish nailer, such as the Bostitch N62FNK-2 will most likely be your tool of choice when assembling the big parts - although you might also consider a Pin Nailer, such as the Grex P650L 23ga. Pinner, if attaching smaller, more intricate details - such as trim.

    Tip: Some people prefer to paint their mantel rather than stain it; keep this in mind as you visualize what the finished project will look like. Depending on the design you choose, you might have to paint or stain the materials prior to assembling.

    Good Luck & Happy Holidays,
    ~ The Nail Gun Depot Team

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  • Nail Gun Basics

    Don't let using a nail gun be an intimidating experience. After all, everyone's got to start somewhere. Learn the basics right here at Nail Gun Network.

    Step 1: Choose a Nail Gun

    What type of project are you working on? It will impact your choice or nail gun—also known as a pneumatic nail gun or "nailer". Choose from: a framing nailer; brad nailer for light trim and molding, which uses small nails that won’t split wood; or a trim nailer, for slightly thicker nails than brad nails. Choose the nail gun that's best suited for your application. For most home DIY projects, such as decking and framing, you'll want a framing nail gun. 

    MAX-Users-Edit

    Step 2: Choose a Nail

    Strip or coil? This decision refers to the way the nails are attached to one another or collated, and subsequently, how they're loaded into the tool's magazine. Strip nails come in a paper or plastic strip, while coil nails (example, below) are attached by a wire coil weld. Coil nailers allow for less reloading, as they typically hold more nails. If you're doing a big job or are a contractor, this is the way to go. Most DIYers choose a strip nailer.

    Clipped head or full head? Clipped head nails are just what they sound like, part of the head has been removed. This allows the nails to be collated closer together, which means more nails in the strip and less reloading. The holding power doesn't differ much, however, some coastal states still require full head nails for certain projects. Always check local building codes when building structures.

    WireCoilFramingNails

    Galvanized or not? Galvanized nails are coated to resist rust and corrosion, so if you're completing an outdoor project or something that will be exposed to moisture, galvanized nails offer greater weather resistance. If money isn't an object (but superior corrosion-resistance is, opt for stainless steel nails).

    Step 3: Decide How to Power Your Nail Gun

    Nail guns can be powered by air, electricity, fuel or batteries. When you buy your nail gun you will need to know how it receives power. Most choose an air powered nail gun for its reasonable price point and ample power. However, air powered tools require an air compressor. Your nail gun will be attached to the compressor by a hose and will be either gas powered or electric. 

    Some manufacturers offer air compressor and nailer kits, such as the Bostitch 3-Tool Finish and Trim Kit, below. The nice thing about power tool/compressor combo kits is that they take the confusion out of choosing a nailer, hose and compressor—plus you can get a little more bang for your buck.

    Bostitch Kit

    Step 4: Ready, Load..

    Load your gun according to the instructions. The strip nail guns are similar to loading a stapler. Pull back the magazine, insert the nail strip, and release the magazine to allow tension on the nail strip. To load a coil nail gun, open the magazine (inside there will be an adjustable nail tray). Set the tray for the length of nail that you are using. Insert the nail coil into the magazine. Toward the nose of the tool, you will find a “feed pawl” which guides the nails into the chamber. Be sure the wire and nail heads are aligned with the proper grooves.

    Step 5: Fire!

    Most nail guns require the nose to be pressed against a surface to fire. This is a safety feature so that the gun is not accidentally shot. There are usually two choices for operation: bump fire and sequential. Sequential requires you to pull the trigger each time you want to shoot a nail. Bump fire eliminates the trigger and fires each time the nail gun is pressed up against a surface

    Beyond this, always read the tool manual, do some tests fires into scrap wood, and wear proper safety gear. Now you're on your way to hassle-free nailing!

     
    ~ The Nail Gun Depot Team
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  • How To Choose A Nail Gun For Your Project

    Nail guns are a great addition to a tool arsenal; they speed up a job, drive nails into hard-to-reach areas, and drive smaller nails without bending or breaking them. How do you choose a nail gun for your project? To help you decide, we look at the main nail guns homeowners use:

    Framing Nailer

    A framing nailer is used for larger projects such as fencing, deck building, roof sheathing, sub-flooring, and (of course) framing. Framing nail guns drive some of the larger gauge nails, from about .113" to .131" in diameter with lengths from 1-1/4" long to 3-1/2". Framing nail guns are also excellent for projects involving plaster, as hand hammering can crack and loosen plaster.

    An example of a framing nailer, the Paslode Power Master Plus Pneumatic Nailer

    Finish Nailer

    A finish nailer is a versatile tool, and drives either 15- or 16-gauge nails. They are used for smaller projects than framing nails, such as crown molding, baseboards, cabinets, chair rails, decorative trim, millwork, and hardwood flooring. Finish nails are sturdy enough to hold these larger pieces, but small enough that they can be puttied over for the finished product.

    FinishPro42XP

    Brad Nailer

    A brad nailer drives even smaller, 18-gauge brad nails,. Brad nailers are used for smaller trim, for which larger nails might split the wood. Using a hammer to drive brad nails can be frustrating due to their ultra-thin pins that can bend easily. This is why a nail gun is favorable when working on an ongoing project.

    Hitachi NT50AE2

     

    Gas-powered Nail Guns

    Gas-powered nail guns use a fuel cell with a rechargeable battery. This type of nailer does not require an air compressor, hose or cord, which offers some convenience. It's considered a more costly way to power a nail gun, as opposed to a pneumatic tool.

    Air-Powered or Pneumatic Nailers

    This is the most popular choice for power fastening tools, as it is an affordable, powerful and convenient way to power your nail gun. This type of nailer uses compressed air to drive nails. If you choose a pneumatic tool, make sure that the air requirement for the nail gun and the compressor match - ensuring your nail gun will work properly.

    Bostitch Pneumatic Finish Nailer

    Don't forget to consider the brand when making your decision. Trusted brands such as Stanley Bostitch, Hitachi, Senco or Paslode will usually lead to less jams and repairs. 


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  • Nail Gun Depot Now Offers Full Line Of Fasco Scrails

    Nail Gun Depot now offers a full line of Fasco Scrails. Scrails can be driven with a nail gun and feature a Phillips or Square drive head, for easy removal. This product can be used anywhere a screw could go. Scrails offer an extremely fast and efficient way to get the job done quickly - without having to worry about floor squeaks or nail popping. They are twice as fast as collated screws - and eight times faster than bulk screws. Scrails are the answer to any project that demands exceptional holding power - with the potential need for disassembling.

    Scrails are available in a wide variety of types and collations including coil or strip, galvanized, stainless steel and a mixture of colors for composite decking. These fasteners are an excellent choice for decking, crating, fencing, framing, sub-flooring, manufactured housing, concrete forms, scaffolding, stage sets, outdoor furniture and much more!

    See how Scrails work here! Fasco Scrails are in stock and ready to be shipped right to your door. For questions concerning this exciting new product, feel free to contact one of our friendly staff members at 888-720-7892, or via chat.

     

    ~ The Nail Gun Depot Team

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  • How To Protect Yourself When Using A Nail Gun

    The first and most important rule to nail gun safety, always read the operator's manual before using a tool. This will give you an understanding of the tool itself, including parts, operation, as well as any special circumstances associated with operation.

    Once you have read and understood the manual, make sure that you put on OSHA required “Z87” safety goggles. Depending on the conditions with which you are working, make sure you utilize other personal safety equipment, such as a hard hat and hearing protection.

    Next, remember to always keep the tool pointed away from yourself and others, especially when it's connected to air - also remember to keep hands and other body parts away from the nose of the nail gun. Always store idle tools out of reach from minors.

    It's also important to note that you should never use a tool that leaks air or needs repair. This includes not running a pneumatic tool over the recommended air pressure.

    Never load a fastener with the trigger or safety element depressed - and do not drive fasteners on top of other fasteners, or at too steep of an angle. Always be careful when loading fasteners.

    For any additional information, please refer to the owner's manual of your tool.
     
    ~ The Nail Gun Depot Team
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