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Tag Archives: pneumatic nailer
  • What Size Air Compressor Do I Need For My Tool?

    If you're using pneumatic tools, there's no avoiding the need for an air compressor. But when it comes to compressors, you'll find they come in a variety of shapes and sizes - so how much compressor do you really need? Use these simple guidelines to determine which air compressor suits your needs best.

    In most scenarios, a portable hand-carry compressor will provide more than enough power to keep your pneumatic fastening tool up and running. Take this for instance - a small 1HP portable unit (delivering 2.0 CFM – cubic feet of air per minute) allows a large nail gun to operate at about 15 nail drives per minute. That same compressor will run a medium-size finishing nailer at about 30 nail drives per minute, and will run a small brad nailer at over 70 drives per minute. So as you can see, the specs of the tool will ultimately dictate the air compressor's performance.

    Senco PC1131 Workshop

    Each tool takes a “breath” of compressed air, which then provides the driving force necessary to sink each fastener. The larger the pneumatic tool, the more air it requires to operate, which is also known as “air consumption per cycle”.

    PRO TIP: If you divide the air consumption per cycle into the CFM of any given air compressor, you will determine the possible drives per minute. This simple calculation should tell you if the compressor is able to properly power the tool you are intending to use.

    Senco Compressors

    All that's left to do is determine how quickly you're planning to run the tool. A professional construction contractor may need the extra juice to operate one - or more - large tools at a high rate of speed. In this instance, a wheelbarrow compressor (either gasoline wheeled or electric wheeled compressor depending on preferred power source) will provide the necessary power required. If similar output is required, but the application is in a fixed location (think assembly line), a large stationary compressor may also work.

    For those running one or two smaller air tools, a portable electric compressor should provide more than enough energy - especially if used with an additional expansion (holding) tank of air. If you are running several small to medium-size air tools, you'll want a compressor rated for 4.0+ CFM. If you're looking to run a finish and trim tool (or similar) individually, a 2.0+ CFM compressor should provide ample power.

    For easy reference, we've included this handy chart below, provided by Senco.

    Senco Compressor Chart

    Which compressor will best suit your project?

     

    ~The Nail Gun Depot Team

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  • How To Maximize Air Compressor Efficiency

    The Nail Gun Network proudly presents the following guest post, originally published on "Zero Sick Days" by RolAir:

    "The key to optimal air compressor efficiency is to maintain the integrity of your entire pneumatic system. This includes the air compressor, fittings, air hose, and tools. An efficient pneumatic system will ensure that you’re getting the air you need, when you need it. An inefficient one will cost you time and money. Follow the steps below to make sure your pneumatic system keeps operating the way it was intended to.

    RolAir Compressors Banner

    1. Use 3/8″ air hose whenever possible. All hoses cause some degree of frictional loss. While 1/4″ air hose is lighter and generally easier to work with, the smaller diameter restricts air flow more than a 3/8″ diameter hose would. If the CFM requirements of the tool(s) being operated is close to the air compressor’s limits, every bit of pressure counts. To ensure you’re getting the maximum amount of pressure to the tool, opt for a larger diameter hose. To get an idea of how air hose diameter affects working pressure, check out this handy Air Flow Calculator.
    2. Use shorter lengths of air hose. The idea here is similar to #1. The farther the air has to travel, the more pressure you lose. We completely understand that situations will arise when you are forced to use long runs of small diameter hose. When that happens, refer to the next step.
    3. Use an auxiliary tank. Adding an auxiliary tank in between two lengths of hose allows the user(s) to maximize distance from the compressor while minimizing frictional loss. For example, if you were to use two 3/8″ x 100′ air hoses, you’d be able to work 200′ from the compressor, but only lose pressure over the length of one 100′ section. The icing on the cake is the fact that the Air Keg can go where the compressor can’t, like on a pitched roof.
    4. Lubricate your pneumatic tools regularly. Just be careful what you put in them. The wrong type of lubricant can cause more harm than good by damaging o-rings and other internal components. The correct type of oil will be labeled as a tool lubricant and will contain special additives to promote long life for pneumatic tools. Of course, the obvious question is “How often?” That depends on the type of tool and how hard it’s being used, but for tools that get used daily, applying 4-5 drops at the start of each shift is a good rule of thumb.
    5. Check the system for leaks. This includes the entire air compressor, all fittings, air hoses and tools. Simply allow the compressor to build to top pressure with the air hose and all other tools and components hooked up. Once the compressor has stopped pumping, watch the tank pressure gauge and listen closely. If the needle stays put, you’ve got a leak-free system. If the needle starts to drop continuously (a slight drop is normal as the air cools) or you hear a hiss of air, you’ve got a leak. Excessive leaks in the system can cause your compressor to run more often than necessary, which leads to premature wear. If you have a difficult time locating the leak, we recommend spraying a soap and water solution on the hose and all fittings. A leak will cause the solution to bubble.

    Rolair on Nail Gun Depot

    Like anything else in the trades, a little bit of planning and preparation up front will pay dividends in the end. If you plan out your pneumatic system prior to each job and add steps 4 and 5 to your preventative maintenance plan, you’ll avoid a few headaches and maximize the lifespan of your equipment. If you feel like your pneumatic system is not performing like it should, give us a call and one of our service reps will help you troubleshoot the issue."

    Give these tips a shot and let us know if you see improved performance!

     

    ~The Nail Gun Depot Team

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  • USA Assembled - The History Of Paslode Tools

    We're less than a week from July 4th, and in the spirit of celebrating Independence Day, we're kicking off a three-part series on the Nail Gun Network, honoring some of the great tool, fastener and compressor manufacturers that either manufacture and/or assemble their products in the United States.
    Paslode
    To kick things off, we start with a founding father in pneumatic nailing - Paslode. The following is a condensed history of the Paslode brand, taken directly from ITW Paslode's website:

    "Paslode's history for innovation began in 1935 when company founder, industrialist J.W. Leslie, felt a key to his company's (Signode Steel) success was demonstrating the product. Unfortunately, his sales representatives wasted time making cold calls on prospects that might not have a use for Signode products. To solve the problem, Mr. Leslie founded a subsidiary company to market shipping room supplies, with the additional intention of scouting potential leads for Signode representatives.

    He called the company Paslode, to describe the product line: Packing, Shipping and Loading Devices. Paslode representatives went door-to-door, identifying likely Signode prospects. The representatives of course also sold Paslode products: stapling hammers and lightweight staplers too.

    Paslode introduced the very first pneumatic tool -- a light duty upholstery tacker - in 1959. This simple tool eventually changed the direction of the company. Paslode's success accelerated the development of a full line of pneumatic tools. Shortly thereafter, Paslode produced the first commercially accepted pneumatic nailer, The Gun-Nailer™, providing the construction industry with a cost-efficient way to increase productivity and reduce worker fatigue.

    Paslode continued to lead the way in the evolution of power fastening with the introduction of its Impulse nailer, the world's first cordless power nailer. Still considered the industry standard by many, the Impulse features a patented combustion motor that provides freedom from compressors and cords - allowing greater safety, maneuverability and versatility.

    An enhanced pneumatic nailer, the PowerMaster™, was introduced in 1995. With its lightweight design and offering more power per pound than competing models, the PowerMaster defined an entirely new generation of pneumatic nailers.

    Addressing the needs of the residential construction, roofing, furniture, pallet and crating, and manufactured housing industries over the years, Paslode has become an industry "staple." Today, Paslode's latest innovations include powerful, lightweight and efficient tools that are designed for all-day comfort and use."

    Sticking true to their guns, Paslode still manufactures a majority of their tools in the United States to this day.
    Wishing A Happy July 4th To All,
    ~ The Nail Gun Depot Team
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  • How To Avoid Destroying Your Pneumatic Nailer

    Basic nail gun maintenance can slash unnecessary repair costs and keep your air-powered nail gun running like new. But, despite minimal effort required for preventative maintenance, we continue to see far too many pneumatic tools reduced to scrap from lack of service.

    We've previously covered how to protect your tools and air compressor during cold temperatures—but what about year-round maintenance? Take a look at these professional maintenance tips to extend the life of pneumatic tools, protecting your investment.

    Keep Tools, like this Senco Frame Pro 325XP, in working order with proper nail gun maintenance

    Avoid Moisture and Exposure

    Depending on the region, a big risk to any pneumatic tool is simply the environment it inhabits. Airborne particles can clog pneumatic nailers and cause undue wear to components within the tool. This is particularly true in coastal regions, where moisture and salt in the air increases the chance for system failure, rusting or corrosion.

    In areas with high moisture content in the air, it's extra important to avoid prolonged exposure to the elements. Invest in a Systainer case or air-tight box to store pneumatic tools that are not in use. The same principle applies to areas that have a lot of dust or sand in the air - particularly when talking about prolonged exposure at a job site.

    Keep Your Tool Oiled

    A universal rule for protecting and prolonging the life of a pneumatic nailer, make sure to regularly oil your tool. A common cause of air nailer failure is component wear due to lack of lubrication. Just like you wouldn't drive a car without oil in the engine, a pneumatic tool requires the same attention. See our blog, Prevent Burnout By Oiling Your Air Nailer.

    It's also crucial to note that pneumatic nailers and staplers require special lubricant, specifically labeled as pneumatic tool oil. Never use WD40, motor oil, transmission fluid or aerosol lubricants. Many generic lubricants eat through rubber over time, which will cause more harm than help in the long run (remember most pneumatic nail guns have rubber o-rings).

    Unless specified otherwise by the manufacturer, make sure pneumatic nailers, staplers and other fastening tools receive regular lubrication to moving parts. Even with a self-oiling valve design, it's important that your pneumatic nailer is receiving the proper amount of lubrication. We recommend putting two or three drops of pneumatic tool oil directly into the coupling joint, before connecting the air hose. Do so daily at the start and finish of use—and be sure to fire the tool two to three times to give the oil a chance to work through the valves.

    Keep tools like this Hitachi NV45AB2 Coil Roofing Nailer from damage to prolong tool life.

    Heed the RECs

    Surprisingly enough, many other causes for system failure on a pneumatic nailer can be prevented by simply using the tool properly. Before firing the nail gun, make sure you are using the correct size and type of nail. Pay careful attention to the nail's angle, as well as the collation.

    You'll also want to check the manufacturer's recommended operating pressure, before hooking up an air compressor, to avoid misfiring caused by inadequate air flow. Too much air pressure can drive nails too deep—whereas too little pressure can cause nails to not sink evenly. Furthermore, consistently using improper air pressure can damage the pneumatic tool over time.

    Make sure you are using the proper size air compressor too. For finish and trim work, small hand-carry compressors will typically perform adequately. For framing tools, or if you are planning to connect multiple air-powered nailers, larger wheelbarrow compressors could be a better fit.


     

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    Paslode Tool Oil & Accessories

    Senco Tool OIl & Accessories

    Tools with Systainer Cases

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  • Nail Guns - Past To Present

    Nail guns are pivotal to the construction, renovation and manufacturing industries. Without them, production time would increase significantly - and cost to manufacture would go up, but how did these tools come to exist? And how have they progressed over the last 50+ years? Instead of looking at new tools, this week let's step into the past - and see the nailers (and brands) that paved the way for the pneumatic and cordless tools we have today.
     
    We start in the early 1950's, an era known in the United States for post-war prosperity. Service men were home, and were using technology from the battlefield to improve the quality of everyday life during peacetime. With American suburbs popping up sporadically (and fast), home builders needed something more than the hammer and nail to keep up with demand. Likewise, a group of men discovered that the technology behind their machine guns from WWII could be applied to a pneumatic powered tool, the nail gun. Pneumatic staplers were introduced long before the nailer became popular, although both tools run using similar principals of operation.
     
    Senco Pinner Ad from the 1950's
     
    Brands including Paslode, Bostitch and Senco were quick to adopt the technology - although many credit Paslode with developing and launching the first successful pneumatic nailer in the 1970's, the Charger SK-312. The type of fastener that each nailer ran also progressed over time, as new technology such as paper tape strip nails (and other forms of collated fasteners) became available. As time and technology advanced, we eventually saw the release of cordless nailers - otherwise known as battery or gas powered nail guns.
     

    What's next on the horizon for nail gun technology? How can we improve on the tools and fasteners we use today? These are questions that constantly make their way through the research and development labs at these and other manufacturers. Despite the field of work, everyone has their own preference of nail gun manufacturer. While we don't favor one brand to another, Nail Gun Depot offers the best selection of all major nailer and stapler manufacturers. 

     ~ The Nail Gun Depot Team

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  • How To Install Hardwood Floors

    With the housing market slowly taking a positive turn, many consumers are beginning to once again buy and sell houses. At the same time, many house hunters are looking for homes they can rehab - giving them a chance to put their personal style into the home they will live. A popular trend in rehab and renovation, and one of the first things many home-buyers will add to their home if it's not already there, installing hardwood floors can enhance your home's appearance - and even add value. Learn how to install hardwood floors, on the blog by Nail Gun Depot.
     
    Your first step in hardwood floor installation is determining the type of wood you want to use, including species, board width and thickness. The finish and color of your hardwood flooring will play a major role in the overall appearance of a room, so make sure you choose flooring that matches your furniture, cabinets, counters and wall color. Know the measurements of the space you will be installing a new floor, to get the most accurate pricing and quantity of materials needed. Thicker wood is typically more expensive, but can add strength to your floor system. If you are working with a tight budget though, you will most likely want to use a thinner cut of wood.
     
     
    When measuring a room for flooring installation, measure the width and length, then multiply for square footage. Order 10-15% extra material to allow for mistakes and irregular board lengths - such as when lining floor boards up to a wall.
     
    Before you even begin to install your hardwood floor, inspect the sub-floor to make sure it is sturdy and free of squeaks. At a minimum, sub-flooring needs to be 3/4" thick. If there is a squeak, drive a long drywall screw into the sub-floor at the joist where the squeak happens. Be sure the sub-floor is clean and free of any debris.
     
     
    Next, you will want to put down a layer of vapor barrier paper. This paper helps to prevent moisture from forming underneath your hardwood, which can eventually lead to cupping or mold if left untreated. You'll want to use 15 pound tar paper or felt, allowing at least 4" of overlap between sheets. Secure the barrier by stapling - and be sure to pencil a line on the baseboards to show where joists are located. You are now ready to begin your installation.
     
    Start installation with the longest wall, and work your way across the room. Remove the shoe molding from the wall and create a chalk line 3/8" from the baseboard, to allow for expansion and contraction due to humidity and climate change. Begin with a long board for the first row. Line up the board's edge to the chalk line and drill pilot holes through the board into the sub-floor and joist. You will want to face nail each board at every joist, using a nail-set. Repeat this for the whole first row of boards - choosing board length at random to stagger the boards. A trick of the trade, lay all of your boards out prior to nailing, to get an idea of length and ensure the boards do not line up uniformly. Lay the floor boards perpendicular to the joists below. This will help to anchor the floor and will add to its sturdiness and integrity. A simple trick to help you determine direction, look at your sub-floor and see which direction the nails run along the joists.
     
     
    Once you have installed a few rows of boards, drill additional pilot holes into each board's tongue, and hand-nail the rolls. Once you have enough clearance, begin using a pneumatic floor nailer. You can also use a manual floor nailer, depending on preference. Keep in mind a pneumatic nailer will probably cost a little more than its manual counterpart, but the ease of use and time that a pneumatic tool saves will justify its use in most cases. You will also need to decide whether to use a flooring nailer versus a flooring stapler. Be sure to research the proper length of a nail or staple for the tool you are using - and the board it is fastening.
     
     
    Position the lip of your pneumatic floor nailer over a board's edge and strike firmly, using a flooring mallet. This will drive the nail into the tongue of the board. The industry standard, drive at least two nails per board - placing them roughly 10" apart. For tongue and groove flooring, make sure each end fits into the corresponding end of the next board. If this is not completed properly, your floor will be left with fairly large gaps. When you approach the opposite wall from where you began the flooring installation, you will again return to drilling pilot holes and using a nail-set, as the pneumatic nail gun will not fit properly.
     
    Once the last board is secured and in place, clean the newly installed hardwood flooring with a damp cloth, using only a water and/or vinegar solution. Finished hardwood is very durable, but can easily be damaged by exposure to dense moisture, direct sunlight, heavy items being dropped, or items scratching across its surface. If you take good care of your hardwood floors, they can last a lifetime.
     

    ~ The Nail Gun Depot Team


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  • What's A Framing Nailer?

    One of the most important woodworking tools on a home-building site, the framing gun will allow you to drive framing nails into support structures without hesitation. Uses can include anything from framing to sheathing, sub-flooring, truss building and decks. These nail guns are designed for heavy-duty use - and can drive a row of fasteners faster than many woodworkers can hammer one framing nail. 
    There are two primary types available - cordless and pneumatic. Cordless framing nailers are powered by a compressed-air fuel cell, paired with a rechargeable battery. The older, more traditional sibling, a pneumatic framing nail gun, generates its energy through an air compressor. Either of these tool variations are perfect for the job site. A cordless framing gun will typically cost more than its pneumatic counterpart, however, you will find that it is much more flexible to use, as it isn't restricted to the length of an air hose. Consider how versatile you need your nailer to be when shopping for a new one.
     
     
    A typical framing nailer will have either a bump-fire or single-shot mechanism, which will allow you to select between how you trigger a nail to be driven. Bump-firing allows you to suppress the nailer's trigger and continuously drive nails as the gun moves across a section of wood. Single-firing, on the other hand, requires you pull the trigger each time you fire a nail. As a safety precaution, almost every new nail gun will require that the nose be pressed against a surface, in order to fire a nail.
     
    The magazine is another area of consideration, when shopping for a framing gun. Depending on your line of work, you will want to consider the benefit of a strip nailer versus a coil nailer. Typically, construction workers and builders who work in high-volume fastening environments prefer the coil nailer, as it allows for a larger magazine capacity - which increases productivity. A DIYer or light-use builder might prefer the strip nailer, as it is lighter weight, easier to load, and generally a bit more versatile. The biggest consideration between a strip or coil nail gun is magazine capacity - just be certain you are purchasing the correct nail for your gun.
     
    If you need some help identifying the right nail for your nailer, use our Fastener Finder.
     

    ~ The Nail Gun Depot Team

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  • Nail Gun Basics

    Don't let using a nail gun be an intimidating experience. After all, everyone's got to start somewhere. Learn the basics right here at Nail Gun Network.

    Step 1: Choose a Nail Gun

    What type of project are you working on? It will impact your choice or nail gun—also known as a pneumatic nail gun or "nailer". Choose from: a framing nailer; brad nailer for light trim and molding, which uses small nails that won’t split wood; or a trim nailer, for slightly thicker nails than brad nails. Choose the nail gun that's best suited for your application. For most home DIY projects, such as decking and framing, you'll want a framing nail gun. 

    MAX-Users-Edit

    Step 2: Choose a Nail

    Strip or coil? This decision refers to the way the nails are attached to one another or collated, and subsequently, how they're loaded into the tool's magazine. Strip nails come in a paper or plastic strip, while coil nails (example, below) are attached by a wire coil weld. Coil nailers allow for less reloading, as they typically hold more nails. If you're doing a big job or are a contractor, this is the way to go. Most DIYers choose a strip nailer.

    Clipped head or full head? Clipped head nails are just what they sound like, part of the head has been removed. This allows the nails to be collated closer together, which means more nails in the strip and less reloading. The holding power doesn't differ much, however, some coastal states still require full head nails for certain projects. Always check local building codes when building structures.

    WireCoilFramingNails

    Galvanized or not? Galvanized nails are coated to resist rust and corrosion, so if you're completing an outdoor project or something that will be exposed to moisture, galvanized nails offer greater weather resistance. If money isn't an object (but superior corrosion-resistance is, opt for stainless steel nails).

    Step 3: Decide How to Power Your Nail Gun

    Nail guns can be powered by air, electricity, fuel or batteries. When you buy your nail gun you will need to know how it receives power. Most choose an air powered nail gun for its reasonable price point and ample power. However, air powered tools require an air compressor. Your nail gun will be attached to the compressor by a hose and will be either gas powered or electric. 

    Some manufacturers offer air compressor and nailer kits, such as the Bostitch 3-Tool Finish and Trim Kit, below. The nice thing about power tool/compressor combo kits is that they take the confusion out of choosing a nailer, hose and compressor—plus you can get a little more bang for your buck.

    Bostitch Kit

    Step 4: Ready, Load..

    Load your gun according to the instructions. The strip nail guns are similar to loading a stapler. Pull back the magazine, insert the nail strip, and release the magazine to allow tension on the nail strip. To load a coil nail gun, open the magazine (inside there will be an adjustable nail tray). Set the tray for the length of nail that you are using. Insert the nail coil into the magazine. Toward the nose of the tool, you will find a “feed pawl” which guides the nails into the chamber. Be sure the wire and nail heads are aligned with the proper grooves.

    Step 5: Fire!

    Most nail guns require the nose to be pressed against a surface to fire. This is a safety feature so that the gun is not accidentally shot. There are usually two choices for operation: bump fire and sequential. Sequential requires you to pull the trigger each time you want to shoot a nail. Bump fire eliminates the trigger and fires each time the nail gun is pressed up against a surface

    Beyond this, always read the tool manual, do some tests fires into scrap wood, and wear proper safety gear. Now you're on your way to hassle-free nailing!

     
    ~ The Nail Gun Depot Team
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  • How To Choose A Nail Gun For Your Project

    Nail guns are a great addition to a tool arsenal; they speed up a job, drive nails into hard-to-reach areas, and drive smaller nails without bending or breaking them. How do you choose a nail gun for your project? To help you decide, we look at the main nail guns homeowners use:

    Framing Nailer

    A framing nailer is used for larger projects such as fencing, deck building, roof sheathing, sub-flooring, and (of course) framing. Framing nail guns drive some of the larger gauge nails, from about .113" to .131" in diameter with lengths from 1-1/4" long to 3-1/2". Framing nail guns are also excellent for projects involving plaster, as hand hammering can crack and loosen plaster.

    An example of a framing nailer, the Paslode Power Master Plus Pneumatic Nailer

    Finish Nailer

    A finish nailer is a versatile tool, and drives either 15- or 16-gauge nails. They are used for smaller projects than framing nails, such as crown molding, baseboards, cabinets, chair rails, decorative trim, millwork, and hardwood flooring. Finish nails are sturdy enough to hold these larger pieces, but small enough that they can be puttied over for the finished product.

    FinishPro42XP

    Brad Nailer

    A brad nailer drives even smaller, 18-gauge brad nails,. Brad nailers are used for smaller trim, for which larger nails might split the wood. Using a hammer to drive brad nails can be frustrating due to their ultra-thin pins that can bend easily. This is why a nail gun is favorable when working on an ongoing project.

    Hitachi NT50AE2

     

    Gas-powered Nail Guns

    Gas-powered nail guns use a fuel cell with a rechargeable battery. This type of nailer does not require an air compressor, hose or cord, which offers some convenience. It's considered a more costly way to power a nail gun, as opposed to a pneumatic tool.

    Air-Powered or Pneumatic Nailers

    This is the most popular choice for power fastening tools, as it is an affordable, powerful and convenient way to power your nail gun. This type of nailer uses compressed air to drive nails. If you choose a pneumatic tool, make sure that the air requirement for the nail gun and the compressor match - ensuring your nail gun will work properly.

    Bostitch Pneumatic Finish Nailer

    Don't forget to consider the brand when making your decision. Trusted brands such as Stanley Bostitch, Hitachi, Senco or Paslode will usually lead to less jams and repairs. 


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  • How A Nail Gun Works

    Ever wonder how your nail gun works? Learn the fundamentals of nailer operation, getting a behind the scenes look at the engineering marvels that power these game changing tools.

    The most common type of nail gun is pneumatic, or air-powered. Compressed air is supplied via a separate air compressor, which is powered by either electricity or gasoline. The air from the compressor is pushed through a hose into a holding area in the nail gun; this is called an air reservoir. The typical pneumatic nail gun uses a piston with a long shaft attached to it called a driver. The driver is what makes contact with the head of the nail and forces it into the work surface. The piston is located in a cylinder inside the main body of the nail gun. The air in the reservoir is held in place by a valve, which is located above the piston.

    Before the trigger is pulled, the air pressure below the piston is greater than the air pressure above it, which keeps the piston at the top of the cylinder. When the trigger of the nailer is depressed, the valve opens, forcing air into the cylinder and making the pressure above the piston greater than below it. This drives the piston down and hammers the nail. When the trigger is released, the air inside the nail gun around the cylinder is vented through the small holes drilled toward the bottom half of the cylinder. This makes the pressure below the piston greater than above it, and forces the piston back up to its starting position. Simultaneously, the valve opens back up and forces the used air through an exhaust port in the top of the nailer.

     
    ~ The Nail Gun Depot Team
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