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Tag Archives: Floor Tool
  • Tools And Projects That Are Worth The Investment

    We usually talk about tool categories for a project, but what about the features of a tool that makes it unique to the competition? Today, we're going to focus on a few of our favorite tools to splurge on, paired with the projects they are built to tackle. Learn which tools and projects are worth the investment.

     

    Framing Projects

    Finding the right Framing Nailer to fasten the bones or frame of your project. One of the most popular choices according to Nail Gun Depot's customers, the Paslode CF325Li cordless framing nailer (replaced by Paslode CF325XP) is built to handle heavy-duty work, with long-term success. Powered by a fuel cell and rechargeable battery, this is the framing tool for tight fitting spaces. Thinking about finishing a basement? It's also the tool for framing your walls.

    Once framing is complete, most contractors will use a screw gun to attach drywall to the wood studs. Available in both battery-powered and electrical-powered variations, the Senco DuraSpin Collated Screw System is among the most popular options on the market today, and trusted by contractors for their quality and versatility. If you're in the market, look at the DS312-18V or DS332-AC to maximize the available range of screws.

    Pro Tip: If finishing a basement, stick to the basics. Less is more in many instances. Putting a lot of intricate detail and fancy upgrades into a basement does not typically return the investment. Unless budget is no object, look at tasteful updates that will boost resale value.

     

    Hardwood Flooring

    Hardwood flooring can add big value to a home and can help make it more attractive to a prospective buyer, if it is done correctly. Starting a hardwood floor installation properly means using tools to get the job done right. Known for making quality flooring tools, the Bostitch MIIIFS is one of the best-selling floor staplers offered at Nail Gun Depot - and comes with a seven-year warranty to support its reputation. 

    Pro Tip: Be sure to know the thickness of the floors you are installing. The typical range of thickness is 1/2" to 3/4" flooring, though other variations are available. Compare different breeds of wood to see which hardwood floor will match your walls and furniture best.

     

    New Trim and Molding

    Ready for small, around the house updates? For trim, molding, shelves, cabinets and more, you'll be looking for either a Finish or Brad Nailer. Once again, Senco is at the top of our must-have tool list with their Fusion line of cordless finish and brad nailers, which are among the most competitive options available to the market today. These battery-powered finishing tools have been recognized by top-tier industry publications including Popular Mechanics and the Journal of Light Construction for their durability, versatility and available features.

    Pro Tip: Adding crown molding to your home can infinitely improve appearance - and even boost resale value. This is an inexpensive upgrade that can payoff big when trying to sell your home. Look to match crown molding and baseboards for an aesthetically pleasing design. When working with a dining room or living space, consider adding a matching chair rail too.

     

    Upholstery Refresh

    Last but not least, you have a fresh, new look for your home, but need some new furniture and decor to add that final, personal touch. When you've run out of ways to improve your house itself, look for ways to compliment its design - through decor. One way to do this is through refinishing and reupholstering furniture. For all of your upholstery work, make sure you choose a staple gun with the capability to take on a wide range of projects, from furniture upholstery to light wood assembly.

    Pro Tip: Measure the length, width and depth of the seating pad and multiply three times the amount of any given dimension to calculate the amount of fabric you will need for your surface. Calculate for each chair separately. Measure from the longest point if working with a curved or angled shape.

    Contact Nail Gun Depot with any questions about these and other tools. Want to compare models? We can help with that too!

    ~ The Nail Gun Depot Team

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  • What's The Difference Between A Floor Nailer & Flooring...

    So you are interested in replacing your hardwood floors, but you don't know which tool will work best for the job? If you look for a flooring tool, you will see there are flooring nailers and floor staplers. The tools may look similar, but which one is the one you need? The answer is, either tool can work for you, but let's explore some of the differences between a floor nailer and flooring stapler, to give you the most informed decision possible.
     
    Bostitch Miiifs
     
     
    Floor nailers are available in two variations, manual or pneumatic (air powered). You might hear a contractor refer to this tool as a flooring cleat nailer, as it most often takes cleat nails for fastening. A manual flooring nailer will require additional muscle, as it relies solely on its user's strength. On the other hand, pneumatic floor nailers assist the user by providing additional force, when inserting a nail. Either of these tools will require a user to hit the driver head when inserting a cleat. The amount of pressure required depends on the density of the wood being installed. A thicker wood will require longer cleats, which also calls for additional force to drive the fastener. You will find it easier to use a pneumatic floor nailer for thick woods, such as Brazilian Cherry.
     
    Powernail 2000
     
    Flooring Staplers are also available in manual or pneumatic variations, although manual floor staplers are typically not preferred in the construction trade. As you can see on Nail Gun Depot, electric staplers are also an option, depending on the source of power that you prefer - although pneumatic is by far the most common offering.
    A hardwood stapler anchors the flooring planks to the sub-floor, driving staples into the tongue of a wood plank. Recognized as an industry "staple," the Bosititch Miiifs is one of the most popular tools for the flooring stapler segment, thanks to its superior performance and time-tested reliability. Operating at 60-100 PSI, the Miiifs can achieve 420 pounds of driving power.
     
    Now that we know the tools available, let's look at the flooring fasteners that make the difference. As you saw above, the tools operate similarly, which means that the difference primarily lies in the fastener itself. It all boils down to nails versus staples. [Also note that you should not switch between nails and staples when installing a floor - whichever fastener you start with should be the only one used throughout the entire project.]
     
    A flooring nail, or cleat, is typically offered in either "L" head or "T" head variation - check and see which variation your nail gun requires. A cleat nail offers a sharp, rigid body to grip the sub-floor firmly. It also features a smooth portion of its body, which allows for seasonal expansion and contraction of the flooring. Typically, cleat nails are available in 16 or 18 gauge - although 20 gauge is also available for certain applications. The more durable option of the two, the drawback to cleats is their cost - compared to the cost of staples.
     
    "L" Cleat
     
    Floor staples provide two-pronged fastening for hardwood flooring. Flooring staples actually provide a stronger initial grip than cleats, but do not hold as firmly when the floor expands and contracts - which can eventually lead to creaking. Another drawback to staples, they can split the tongue of flooring - especially when the plank is less than 3/4" thick. Because staples are less costly to manufacture, they are typically the more cost-effective flooring fastener, when looking at cleats versus staples. However, you also have to consider the long-term durability of your flooring installation, when selecting between staples and nails.
     
    Floor Staple
     
    Regardless of the flooring nailer or stapler you choose to use, it is imperative that you understand your tools prior to using. Applying too much pressure can damage your floor, while applying too little pressure can cause cleats or staples to only be driven partially, resulting in each neighboring plank to not form a tight fit, ruining the entire project.
     
    If you need additional assistance in choosing the perfect flooring nailer, stapler or fastener for your job, Nail Gun Depot's customer service is ready to help!

     ~ The Nail Gun Depot Team

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