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  • The Difference Between Siding vs. Framing Nail Guns

    Today, let's take a look at one of our frequently asked questions, "what's the difference between a siding nailer and framing nailer?" When it comes to applications, such as siding or roofing, customers often don't understand why framing guns aren't the best tool for the job. Don't get us wrong, framing nailers are extremely versatile in purpose, and can definitely pull their weight for more than framing [framing nail guns are also great for decking, sheathing, subflooring and more]. And, in appearance, a coil framing nailer and a siding nailer look nearly identical. But, when it comes to siding installation, investing in a siding nailer may be worth the expense - and here's why.

    Construction Framing

    The primary difference between a coil framing nailer and a siding nailer is nail size. Where framing requires much larger nails that penetrate deep and offer greater holding strength, siding does not require nearly as much support. Think of it this way, connecting 2x4 boards to frame a building requires much more holding power versus simply attaching thin planks to a wood base. Typically, you'll see siding nails range anywhere from 1-1/4" up to 2-1/2" in length, whereas framing nails can go 3-1/2" or more.

    PRO TIP: If installing siding for the first time, be sure to research installation tips based on the type of siding you're using. Siding nailers are popular for use with fiber cement and wood siding applications. On the other hand, vinyl siding is typically hung rather than nailed, as it needs to expand and contract.

    Residential Siding Installation

    With some overlap in nail size, you may wonder whether framing nailers can be used for siding? The answer is, yes.

    Framing nail guns can be used for siding installation, if the nail being used is long enough to attach the siding firmly to your exterior wood sheathing. While it's recommended to always use a siding nail gun for siding installation, in a pinch, you may be able to use a framing nailer instead. However, the same cannot be said inversely. Since most applications in framing require longer nails that are specifically intended to join lumber together, more often than not, siding nails will not be enough.

    siding installation

    You may also find that siding nailers are a few pounds lighter than framing guns. The average siding nailer weighs right around 5 LBS., while coil framing nailers typically run 8-9 LBS. minimum. For those installing siding, this makes the siding gun that much more desirable, as it should be less fatiguing to operate.

    As far as cost goes, you're looking at roughly the same price range on either tool. On Nail Gun Depot, you'll find an average range of $250 to $350 for either type of coil nailer. As with anything, build quality, brand preference and product features will all influence each tool's price.

     

    ~ The Team at Nail Gun Depot

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  • How To Load Top vs. Bottom Loading Staple Guns

    For projects in upholstery, woodworking and more - if you're using a staple gun - loading the magazine with staples is the first step, before real work can begin. Depending on the manufacturer and model of your tool, it may require loading staples into the magazine from the top, or the bottom. As always, consult your owner's manual first, for exact step-by-step instruction. However, for most air-powered and electric staple guns, the following tips demonstrate how to load both top and bottom feed staplers.

    One of the easiest ways to identify top, versus bottom loading staple guns, is by determining the type of staple gun.

    Bottom loading magazines can be found on the majority of cordless staple guns, as well as most fine wire and upholstery staplers. On the other hand, top loading staple gun magazines have been in use much longer than bottom load, and are still predominantly found on large-body, medium and heavy wire pneumatic staplers.

    **Pro Tip: If you don’t know whether your staple gun is top or bottom loading, look at the staple exit point on the tool. Then, find the release button. The magazine feed release is usually located on the opposite side of where the staples are fired.

    There’s also a general pattern between staple gauge (thickness), and magazine loading type. In terms of light wire staples, 20 gauge, 22 gauge and other similar thicknesses are typically used with bottom load staple feeds, whereas 16 gauge, 18 gauge and larger wire staples are mostly used with top loading systems.

    When it comes to loading staples, top loading is generally the slower of the two processes. Bottom loading is faster and more convenient in most instances, except when the tool is being used with a mount, such as when used in high-volume production work. During loading, bottom feed systems require the stapler to be turned upside down, which prevents the staples from falling out.

    The differences between top loading and bottom loading staple guns are minimal, but important for problem-free operation. Check out the following step by step images demonstrating how to load both top - and bottom - feed staple gun magazines.

    TOP LOAD: STEP BY STEP DEMONSTRATION

    Hitachi Top Load Stapler

    Hitachi Top Load Stapler

    How To Load Top Load Stapler

    Hitachi Top Load Stapler

    BOTTOM LOAD: STEP BY STEP DEMONSTRATION

    Senco How To Load Bottom Load Stapler

    How to load bottom feed staple gun step 1

    How To Bottom Load Stapler Step 2

    Loading Bottom Load Stapler

    How To Load Bottom Feed Stapler Closing Magazine Feed

    Bottom Load Senco Stapler Upside Down

    Need more? Be sure to consult your owner's manual for exact maintenance and operation procedure before use.

     

    ~ The Team at Nail Gun Depot

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  • Top Cold Weather Nail Gun Accessories

    Freezing temperatures mean it’s time to stock up on cold resistant tools and supplies. Using air tools and compressors without proper winter maintenance can result in undue wear, tear and deterioration. Before firing up your air tools in the bitter cold, take a look at Nail Gun Depot's checklist for cold weather preventative maintenance tips and supplies:

    cold weather nail gun tips

    Moisture Reducing Air Tool Oil

    Air tools need good lubrication to combat the condensed water that builds up, then freezes, in their system. For sub-zero temperatures, Paslode 219090 cold weather air tool oil is formulated with anti-freeze, which keeps your air tool running efficiently in temperatures of 32 degrees and below. Another great option, the Senco PC1295 moisture shield air tool oil protects your pneumatic tool in cold, damp conditions.

    Cold Resistant Air Hoses

    An air tool is nothing without its air hose, and for use in cold weather conditions, you'll need a hose that's resistant to freezing temperatures. Consider hoses that remain flexible in a wide range of temperature. Hoses made from rubber are generally the top recommended option for cold weather, but are sometimes not preferable due to the heavier weight of rubber. To avoid the additional weight of rubber, hybrid air hoses are becoming a popular contender for low temperature use. A hybrid blend of polyurethane, rubber and PVC offers decent cold weather resistance, without the bulkiness of rubber. Hybrid options, such as the RolAir NOODLE hose, offer a reduced weight design that remains flexible in temperatures as low as -40 degrees.

    Low Temperature Fuel Cells

    Being prepared with the right fuel cells can make the difference between getting your job done or postponing it. Fuel cells that aren’t rated for the extreme cold will freeze up. If running a Paslode cordless framer, CF325 orange framing fuel (816008) works in all seasons, between 18 and 120 degrees Fahrenheit. It also eliminates the need for additional warming or pumping up, making it extremely easy to insert and run.

    **Pro Tip: Keep one fuel cell warm, and one in the tool to use. After 4 to 5 strips of nails, put the warm fuel cell into your tool and keep the previous one warm to avoid freeze-ups.

    Pneumatic tools are especially prone to winter weather problems, such as internal moisture build-up, frozen fuel cells and stiff air hoses.

    Keeping with the idea that cordless nailers work where pneumatic models won't, battery-only tools require nothing extra to run in the cold. Truly the best solution to running a nailer during winter, consider battery-only cordless tools. New cordless models from Bostitch, Dewalt and Hitachi all offer a battery-only power source, perfect for working in winter-like conditions.

    Winter isn't coming - it's here. Are your tools ready for the cold?

     

    ~ The Team at Nail Gun Depot

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