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Tag Archives: construction
  • Nail Gun Basics

    Don't let using a nailer or nail gun be an intimidating experience... learn the basics right here on Nail Gun Depot!

    Step 1: Choose a Nail Gun

    • What type of project are you working on? Will you need a framing nail gun, brad nail gun (for light trim and molding, this gun shoots smaller nails that won’t split the wood and are less visible), trim nail gun (these nails are slightly thicker than brad nails), flooring nail gun, roofing nail gun or concrete nail gun? Choose the nail gun that is best for you. For most at home projects, such as decking and framing, you would want to choose a framing nail gun.
    • Strip or coil? This refers to the way the nails are collated. Strip nails come in a strip, coil nails in a coil. Coil nail guns allow for less reloading, as they hold more nails.  If you are doing a big job or are a professional, this is the way to go. Most DIYers choose a strip nail gun.

    Step 2:  Choose a Nail

    • Clipped head or full head? Clipped head nails are just what they sound like, part of the head has been clipped off. This allows the nails to be collated closer together, which means more nails in the strip and less reloading. The holding power does not differ much, however some coastal states still require full head nails for certain projects.
    • Galvanized or not? Galvanized nails are coated to resist rust and corrosion, so if you are completing an outdoor project or something that will be exposed to moisture, galvanized is what you want.

     

    Step 3: How Will You Power Your Nail Gun?

    • Nail guns can be powered by air, electricity, fuel or batteries. When you buy your nail gun you will need to know how it receives power. Most choose an air powered nail gun for its reasonable price point and ample power. However, air powered tools require an air compressor. Your nail gun will be attached to the compressor by a hose. Your compressor will be either gas powered or plug into the wall. You can purchase nailer kits with a compressor at Nail Gun Depot.

     

    Step 4: Load

    • Load your gun according to the instructions. This is a relatively simple process. The strip nail guns are similar to loading a stapler. Pull back the magazine, insert the nail strip, and release the magazine to allow tension on the nail strip. To load a coil nail gun, open the magazine - inside there will be an adjustable nail tray - set the tray for the length of nail that you are using. Insert the nail coil into the magazine. Toward the nose of the tool, you will find a “feed pawl” which guides the nails into the chamber - so be sure the wire and nail heads are aligned with the proper grooves.

     

    Step 5: Fire

    • Most nail guns will require the nose to be pressed against a surface to fire. This is a safety feature so that the gun is not accidentally shot. There are usually two choices for operation: bump fire and sequential. Sequential requires you to pull the trigger each time you want to shoot a nail. Bump fire eliminates the trigger and fires each time the nail gun is pressed up against a surface
    Now you are on your way to hassle free nailing!
     
    Your Source For Nailer Knowledge,
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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  • How To Choose A Nail Gun For Your Project

    You've decided to use a nail gun on your next project, but what type of nailer do you need? Nail guns come in a variety of shapes and sizes depending on the project you need it to complete. To learn what makes each type of nail gun unique, let's look at some of the main ones homeowners use:

    • Framing nail gun - This type of nail gun is used for larger projects such as fencing, deck building, sub-flooring and (of course) framing. These nailers are also excellent for projects involving plaster, as hammering can crack and loosen plaster.
    • Finish nail gun - This nail gun drives either 15 or 16 gauge nails - depending on the finish nailer - and is used for crown molding, baseboards, cabinets, chair rails, wood furniture, decorative trim, millwork, caskets, hardwood flooring, furniture and paneling. Finish nails are sturdy enough to hold these larger pieces, but small enough that they can be puttied over for the finished product.

    FinishPro42XP

    • Brad nail gun - A brad nailer drives even smaller, 18 gauge brad nails, versus a finish nailer. Brad nailers are used for smaller trim, as larger nails can split the wood. Using a hammer to drive brad nails can be frustrating due to their ultra-thin pins that can bend easily.

    Hitachi NT50AE2

    Now you need to decide how to power your nail gun:

    • Gas-powered - This nail gun uses a fuel cell with a rechargeable battery. This nailer does not require an air compressor, hose or cord - which makes it convenient. However, this is a more costly way to power your nailer.
    • Air powered or pneumatic - This is the most popular choice for power fastening tools, as it is a cheap, powerful and convenient way to power your nail gun. This nail gun uses compressed air to drive nails. If you choose pneumatic, make sure that the air requirement for the nail gun and the compressor match - ensuring your nail gun will work properly.
    Bostitch Pneumatic Finish Nailer

    Don't forget to consider the brand when making your decision, trusted brands such as Stanley Bostitch, Hitachi, Senco or Paslode will usually lead to less jams and repairs. Nail guns can speed up a job, allow you to drive nails into hard to reach areas, and drive smaller nails without the frustration of bending or breaking. NailGunDepot.com offers a wide selection of nailers, so check us out - and good luck on your next project!

    Nail Your Next Project,
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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  • How To Clean & Maintain Your Paslode Cordless Nailer

    Many people aren’t aware of how little maintenance is required to keep your Paslode tools in top working condition. Less than twenty minutes, once every six months, that’s all it takes. We’ve compiled the steps for maintaining your cordless tools:

    • Gather Needed Supplies - Grab your lint free rag, tool oil, tool cleaner, and Allen wrench. A lint free rag is important as you don’t want to leave any particles in the tool.
    • Safety First - Remove everything; battery, fuel, and nails.

     

    Maintenance:

    • Clean - Grab your tool cleaner. Begin removing dirt and residue from the filter, cylinder head assembly and combustion chamber.
    • Oil - Oil your motor assembly sleeve, seal rings and combustion chamber.
    • Reassemble - Make sure that all screws are tight. Loose screws can result in personal injury or malfunction - for example, a loose nose could cause your nailer to fire multiple nails.
    • Test it - Make sure everything is in working order. It is normal for the tool to release a small amount of smoke. However, if something is malfunctioning, you are going to want to consult the product manual. If you can’t resolve the problem, contact the manufacturer.

     

    Tips:

    *Don’t forget to check the expiration date on the fuel cells. If your fuel is expired, this could be causing problems.

    *YouTube videos can be a great resource for tool maintenance, if you are doing maintenance for the first time or prefer a visual example.

    A well maintained tool can lead to improved productivity and years of reliable service.

     

    The Team At Nail Gun Depot

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