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Tag Archives: coil nails
  • Nailing Versus Stapling For Roof Shingles

    If you work in or around the U.S. roofing industry, an age-old question you are bound to hear - which is better, nailing or stapling roofing shingles? Get expert advice on both options, as well as tips to calculate materials usage and more!

    Let's start with stapling.

    In the past, when it came to the debate of roofing nails versus staples, the industry was split down the middle. After all, it's no surprise roofers loved staples for attaching shingles to roofing. Staples cost less than nails, offer exceptional holding strength, and cover a greater area of space with a more versatile and compact collation. Paired with the fact staplers are typically easier to handle than a coil nailer - and a stapler is less complex to repair - it's easy to see why stapling would be the preferred method for fastening shingles.

    Senco RoofPro 455XP Roofing Nailer

    PRO TIP: When estimating nail or staple usage for your roofing project, you should budget 400 nails or staples per square. Breaking it down further, you'll typically use four fasteners per 3-tab shingle. However, always consult your local building authority for exact code requirements.

    Bostitch Roofing Nailer

    Flash forward to present day, where coil roofing nails dominate the market. But what changed?

    Within the last two decades, the roofing industry has shifted its preference toward the roofing nail. What's ironic, it can actually be argued the staple has better holding power compared to the nail. Nonetheless, here's why coil roofing nails have gained such popularity over staples.

    Hitachi NV45AB2 Coil Roofing Nailer

    While many factors have led modern roofers to use nails more often than staples, the strongest argument doesn't actually involve the quality of either fastener, but rather depends on the patience and precision of the end user. The problem with attaching a shingle to roof using staples, if the positioning of the staple is not perpendicular to the shingle itself, holding strength is greatly compromised. Staples are also much easier to over-drive, or under-drive, both scenarios that can further contribute to holding issues. With roofing nails this issue doesn't exist, because the nail has a round head - just make sure the nail gets driven straight into the shingle.

    Other benefits to using coil roofing nails include higher capacity magazine load, adjustable depth of drive on most roofing nailers, and most roofing nails maintain a universal design for ease of compatibility.

    Stinger Cap Coil Roofing Nailer

    In some areas of the U.S. today, staples have even been banned from shingle to roof installation, due to the likelihood of improper installation. Depending on region, other regulations may dictate type of galvanization or coating, or even require stainless steel in coastal areas. As always, please confirm code requirements with your local building authority prior to starting a project.

     

    ~ The Team At Nail Gun Depot

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  • Name-Brand Quality On Budget - Everwin & SureFit Make A...

    There's a lot of "generic" competition when it comes to hardware and power tools. For the most part, these brands quickly earn a reputation for cheap, disposable products. But, every now and again, you find someone that gets it right. Those few select companies that can engineer a tool or fastener to name-brand specification, but still maintain bargain-brand pricing. Over the years, we've seen our share of winners - and losers - but two of our best finds yet are just now gaining the notoriety they deserve, especially when used together. That's right, we're talking about Everwin Pneumatic tools - paired with our top-quality lineup of SureFit fasteners.

    Everwin Tri-App

    Here's why these two should be on YOUR radar.

    Everwin Pneumatic may be relatively new to market, but they are far from inexperienced. In fact, the concept for Everwin was born in 2012, when several veteran tool engineers realized they could manufacture a pneumatic nailer, comparable in quality to products from Bostitch, Hitachi, MAX and others of the like, but without the vast overhead their competitors embrace.

    Everwin Tools

    The outcome? A rapidly growing selection of pneumatic nailers and staplers, built to match the name-brand build quality a contractor or assembler requires, but offered at a fraction of the cost.

    Everwin Pneumatic

    To date, Everwin has branched into several new categories of collated fastening tools, including wide and medium crown construction staplers, siding nailers, and carton closing staplers. Despite growth, Everwin's core product line, industrial coil nailers, remains the backbone of their business. Launching with the PN57 and PN70 model pallet nail guns, Everwin now offers more than ten industrial coil nailers, mostly pallet coil nailers for both handheld and automated use. To see Everwin's full selection of tools, click here.

    Everwin Construction Stapler

    Take the plunge, we promise you'll love your Everwin just as much as its brand-name counterpart. With money to spare. But wait, there's more...

    Everwin Pallet Nailer

    You'll need a quality fastener to go with your quality tool. We recommend SureFit fasteners, designed and built to brand-name specification - but available at a fraction of the cost. With a selection of collated framing nails, coil nails, roofing nails, hanger nails, finish nails, brads, carton staples, stick staples and several other series' to choose from, we suggest SureFit for any compatible nailer or stapler. Don't forget to add a box of SureFit nails or staples to your order!

    SureFit Nails

    Still need an extra push? How about discount freight shipping, delivered to your door. Your volume fastener order may qualify for special freight shipping rates on Nail Gun Depot. Check best available rates to your area during checkout.

     

    ~The Team At Nail Gun Depot

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  • Why You Should Consider Buying Fasteners In Bulk

    When is the right time to start buying your fasteners in bulk? The truth is, there isn't a one-size-fits-all answer. It really depends on the size of your operation - and your forecast for future work. For the amateur woodworker churning out a project or two every month, you probably don't need a skid of nails, when a box or two will suffice. For a contractor with several projects on the calendar - a completely different story. Let's take a deeper look, inside The Nail Gun Network.
    Collated Nails
    Buying in bulk has its advantages... and disadvantages. Take the following into account before ordering in bulk:
    • How often do I need to reorder fasteners?
    • Do I typically use the same type of fastener on multiple projects?
    • How can I lower my costs by ordering in volume?

    After asking yourself these questions, consider your options. Most individuals who decide against buying fasteners in bulk determine that they either won't need to use a high volume of fasteners, don't want to spend extra money up front, or simply don't have the space to store a surplus while supply is being depleted. If you find that you're going through more than a box or two of fasteners per week, use the same type of fastener repeatedly (paper tape framing nails, coil nails, etc...), and want to cut your costs drastically - then buying your fasteners in bulk might be the right option for you.

    SureFit Nails By Skid
    Nail Gun Depot, for instance, is making it easier than ever to order your fasteners in bulk - and to kick things off, we're throwing in a free tool and free freight delivery on select SureFit skid quantity purchases - in addition to volume discounts (see offer for full details). Don't see the fastener you need? That's not a problem either, we have the capability to create special skid orders, custom to your liking. We can mix and match the fasteners you get on your skid, throw in tool deals, and even offer freight-paid delivery - so you get the nails or staples you need, delivered to your door, for one flat rate. Deals are available on full-skid and partial-skid purchases. To get started, all you have to do is contact a customer care specialist at Nail Gun Depot, by phone at 1.888.720.7892, or by email at Sales@NailGunDepot.com.
    ~The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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  • What Type Of Nail Is Correct For My Application?

    At the end of 2013, we posted about the various components of a nail and offered some in-depth explanations as to the importance of these components. If you missed our previous posts on nail components, here is a quick refresher - with some added knowledge.

     
    Collated nails are offered in a variety of degrees, sizes and types. This article will take you step by step in determining the classification, range, type and finish required for your application. A popular choice, check out Nail Gun Depot's SureFit nails, if you are looking for a high quality fastener at a fraction of the cost. Another popular choice, Senco nails offer a wide variety of fasteners to choose from, with genuine, time-tested durability.
     

    The first step is to determine what collation angle your tool is designed to run. Some degrees include 20 °, 35 °, 28 ° and 15 °. The next step would be to classify what types of collation the tool handles. Collations include plastic, wire and paper - which can be used in place of plastic.

     

    When you have completed the nail classification, you will then determine the tool range. The length and diameter are known as the range. Length is the size of the nail, each tool will have a minimum and maximum length. Note: some nails are sized in pennies (symbol, D). Diameter is the thickness of the shank or wire gauge. The bigger the number, the thicker the nail.

     

    The type of nail can be broken into three categories; head, point and shank. Head types include duplex, headless, finish, drywall, clipped and full round which is the most common. The type of point determines how the nail will penetrate into your application and the splitting severity. The most common is chisel (diamond) point and the easiest to drive. It is ideal for soft wood applications. Blunt point allows minimal penetration resistance and is commonly used in pallet construction. Flat point, also known as chisel point, requires the most drive power and is frequently used with a screw shank nail.

     

    The nail shank is the part on the nail which does most of the holding. The shank is one of four types: smooth, spiral, ring or screw. Smooth shank nails have exactly that: a smooth appearance and has the least holding power. Spiral shank nails have either a threaded appearance, like a screw, or they can have a helical twist to them. Screw shank nails are used in hardwood applications. Ring shank nails have a series of rings punched into the surface of the shank and offers the most holding power.

     

    The nail finish can be bright, cement coated, electogalvanized, hot dipped galvanized, flash-coated with zinc, hardened steel, stainless steel or aluminum. These different finishes, coatings or material of nails give different levels of protection of resistance to rusting or other special properties to certain applications.

     

    The factors mentioned above such as degree, collation type, nail size and shank diameter can all affect the compatibility of nails with any nail gun. Contact a Nail Gun Depot Customer Service representative to confirm compatibility and determine the best nail for your application. You can also use Nail Gun Depot's Fastener Finder Tool to locate the right nail for your tool.

     
    Here's To Nailing Your Next Project,
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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  • Nail Components (Pt 2)

    Welcome to the second part of our series on nail components. Last week, we talked about nail types, shank types and point types. If you missed part-one, you can check it out here. In the second half, we are going to look at finish types and the importance of angle.

    While the shape of the nail is pivotal to its use, you also want to pay careful attention to the finish. The finish of a nail can determine whether or not it can be used outside, the type of surface it works with and its durability.

     

    Finish:

    Bright: This finish is used for your basic hardware nail. There is no coating, it is just plain steel. This finish offers no corrosion resistance, meaning it can not be used on any exterior applications where it will be exposed to precipitation.

    Electro-Galvanized: Similar to the bright finish, electro-galvanized nails are coated with zinc via an electrical charge. These provide slightly more corrosion resistance than the bright finish, BUT should still not be used for exterior projects that are exposed to weather.

    Hot-Dipped Galvanized: These nails are dipped in liquid zinc to provide good corrosion resistance. The resulting finish is composed of a clumpy, zinc exterior. These nails can be used for exterior applications.

    Stainless Steel: This finish offers resistance to corrosion for the lifetime of the nail. Stainless is able to be used for exterior projects and works particularly well with wood such as cedar and redwood. It is popular in markets that have a significant amount of moisture in the air.

    Aluminum: This metal offers less durability than stainless, but also boasts a corrosion-free lifespan. It is typically used for applications such as attaching aluminum trims or gutters.

    Copper: Copper, being a more expensive material, is typically only used when fastening to other copper materials. It is used more for appearance than utility.

    Blue Oxidized: This finish is the result of degreasing and heat cleaning, which leaves the nail with a blue coating. This finish is typically used with plaster.

    Vinyl Coating: Vinyl coated nails provide enhanced holding strength and are easier to drive. The downside to vinyl coating is that these nails are not useable for outdoor or exterior projects.

    Cement Coating: The cement (resin) coating is applied to the nail to improve holding strength and can make the nail easier to drive. It should not be used for applications that will be exposed to weather and precipitation, so exercise caution if using for exterior projects.

    Phosphate Coating: The use of a phosphate coating improves holding strength and provides an excellent surface – for use with paint or putty. The phosphate attracts paint and retains it better than most other nail finishes.

     

    Angle:

    The angle of a nail is based on the variation in degree that the nail sits from the vertical (base). The angle of nail required varies from nail gun to nail gun – but typically sits in a range between 15 and 34 degrees – if the nailer is angled. If a nail gun is angled, the manufacturer should list the degree of angle required in the nail gun’s specs.

    From nails to nailers, there are a plethora of choices to select from when choosing the right tools for your project. We hope that this two-part series on nail components will help you in determining which nail works best for your needs.

     

    We always appreciate feedback and comments. Feel free to reach out to us at sales@nailgundepot.com if you have an idea or request for a future blog post – or simply want to offer input on a topic.

     

    Good Luck In Selecting Your Next Nail,

    The Team At Nail Gun Depot

     

    P.S. We will be taking a two-week break from blogging during Christmas and the New Year to observe the holidays and enjoy time with friends and family - Our store will remain open during regular business hours. Keep an eye out for our next post on January 7, 2014.

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  • Nail Components (Pt 1)

    We've talked a lot about using nail guns, but what about the nails that go in them? We get questions all of the time asking about the components of a nail. The type? The shank? Point and finish?

    What makes each nail different? The average person only knows about one type of nail, the simple flat head design with a smooth shank and blunt diamond point. This is the most common style for nails used in everyday construction, but what about other nail types? Let's take a look at some of the variations in nail design and function - but first, let's go over some basic terms that define the structure of a nail.

    A nail is composed of three parts - the head (top), the shank (body) and the point (tip). Size and length will vary depending on the type of job you are working on - your nail gun will tell you which size nails it will work with. Finally, you have the finish of the nail, which represents the nail's exterior - and can come coated (resin), galvanized (dipped) or untreated.

     

    Now that we know some of the basic terms regarding the structure of a nail, it's time to look at the variations in their structure.

     

    Type:

    Flathead: This is the most common type of head for a nail. Available in different forms such as full (regular), clipped (reduced head size) and off center (head sits to the side of base), this nail's larger head size offers stronger holding capability.

    Brad & Finish Nails: These nails are typically used for finishing work, such as attaching trim and molding. Having a smaller head means these nails do not have the holding strength of their flathead counterpart, but they are able to fit in tighter places and are less noticeable to the naked eye, after installation.

    Duplex: The duplex nail is intended for temporary use, featuring a double head for easy removal. These nails resemble a push-pin, and are designed to work as a placeholder - before a permanent application has been made.

     

    Shank:

    Smooth: The smooth shank is the most common shank that can be found on nails. The easiest to produce, this type of shank also provides the least amount of holding strength.

    Ring: The ring design on a shank provides improved holding strength and can be recognized by the threaded rings that run along the body of the nail. Its appearance resembles a smooth body nail running through a spring.

    Screw: A screw design has a body similar to its screw counterpart, but is driven into wood without the traditional screw head. It features a spiral design that covers about 3/4 of the nail's body.

    Spiral: Similar to the screw, this shank spirals the entire body of the nail.

     

    Point:

    Blunt: This is the most common of nail points. It reduces splitting when being driven, which makes it an asset to anyone using a nailer.

    Long: This point is mostly used in drywall installation, as it has a long, sharp, needle-like tip that can be driven deep.

    Chisel: This type of point is mostly used for heavy duty projects, such as pallet-building and industrial assembly. The chisel tip also helps to avoid splitting.

    Flat: This point does not have a sharp or jagged edge. It features a smooth point.

    Clinch: This point is off center, but is sharp like the chisel. One side of this point is shorter than the other.

     

    Have we sparked your interest? Check back next week for the second half of this two-part series on nail components.

     

    Best Of Luck On Your Next Project,

    The Team At Nail Gun Depot

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