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Tag Archives: cordless nailer
  • Paslode Transitions To Lithium-Ion Cordless Power

    Remember when Paslode first released its industry-changing cordless Impulse nailers? Nailing was never the same.

    Yet again, Paslode is raising the stakes, taking their cordless nailers into the 21st Century with lithium-ion power. Just like before, each Paslode cordless tool still requires a fuel cell to operate; but now offers better range and improved ergonomics. The transition was recently completed, when Paslode released their IM200-Li cordless brad nailer.

    Paslode IM200-Li

    "Why Choose Paslode Cordless? Paslode Cordless offers durable and lightweight solutions to your everyday work. Not only does Paslode Cordless offer more balance and control, but it was made to withstand the tough jobsite conditions. Paslode Cordless Systems were built to keep up with you." ~ Paslode.com

    Paslode IM250S-Li

    Let's take a closer look at the full Paslode Li-Ion cordless lineup:

    When it comes to framing, Paslode's cordless framing nailer has enjoyed one of the longest running success stories in the business. The current generation Paslode CF325XP, which recently replaced the CF325-Li, offers the same benefits as its predecessor, but with 15% increased driving power, low temperature usability (tool works in conditions down to 14 degrees Fahrenheit - when using all-season orange fuel cell), and up to 50% longer run time per battery charge. Eligible for Paslode's 2 Year Service Promise, the CF325XP (905600) is also backed by a standard five-year warranty. This Paslode framing nailer is tried, tested - and now better than ever before.

    Paslode CF325XP

    Paslode doesn't stop with framing. Now boasting a full line of Li-Ion cordless finish and trim nailers, the Paslode brand has come full circle. Choose between a 16 gauge straight IM250S-Li (916000), 16 gauge angled IM250A-Li (902400), and the most recent addition - an 18 gauge brad nailer IM200-Li (918000). All lithium-ion - all ready to work.

    Paslode 916000

    Like the CF325XP, these Paslode Li-Ion cordless finish nailers are lighter weight (easier to carry and use), can be recharged quicker, and hold their charge for a longer range of time. Don't forget, these Paslode cordless finish nailers do still require a small yellow fuel cell to operate.

    Paslode Cordless Nail Gun Depot Promotion

    To celebrate this milestone, for a limited time get a FREE Paslode Yellow Finish Fuel (816007) or Orange Framing Fuel Cell (816008), when purchasing ANY Paslode lithium-ion framing or finish nailer on Nail Gun Depot. Deal starts Friday (7/22/16) and runs while supplies last.

     

    ~The Team At Nail Gun Depot

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  • What Cordless Nail Gun Should I Buy?

    It's hard to ignore the increasing presence of cordless tools coming to market. Today, let's take a look at those different types of cordless nailers. We'll look at brand, product application, and variation(s) of cordless technology available. Let's start by breaking down the core categories of cordless.

    Senco Cordless Battery

    Framing Nailers & Metal Connecting Nailers

     

    Cordless framing nailers have improved quite a bit since the first Paslode Impulse tool was released in July of 1986 - nearly 30 years ago to the day. Today, Paslode cordless tools have improved in every possible way: lighter body, longer battery life, quicker recharge time and more. The CF325XP (905600) is Paslode's current contender in a long running legacy of cordless framing tools. Powered by lithium-ion battery and orange framing fuel cell, the CF325XP is designed for heavy-duty, everyday use.

    Paslode CF325XP

    While Paslode has dominated this segment of the market for many years, another key player is quickly gaining notoriety for their contractor-grade cordless technology. That's right, we're talking about our friends at Dewalt. Currently on their second generation lithium-ion framing tool, Dewalt's MAX XR battery boasts more power and longevity than ever before. Dewalt has also managed to eliminate the need for a fuel cell, without compromising performance. Dewalt's system is as simple as plug-and-play. With the recent release of their DCN693M1 cordless metal connecting nailer - the first of its kind - we've got a hunch this won't be the last cordless nailer from Dewalt.

    Our Recommendation:

    If you don't mind occasionally replacing a fuel cell, Paslode has led cordless framing sales for decades. For tried and tested quality, Paslode is a sure shot.

    Dewalt DCN693 App

    If you're looking for the latest technology, there's no doubt that Dewalt offers a game changer. The MAX XR battery system eliminates the need for fuel cell, and offers improved driving force and length of time between charging cycles.

     

    Finish & Brad Nailers

     

    Unlike the cordless framing market, you'll see a lot more competition when comparing cordless finish and trim nailers. Two main factors dictate the widespread growth for this segment of the industry - market share and tool design. Generally speaking, the market for finish and trim nailers is infinite. Between contractors, weekend warriors, and woodworking hobbyists, there is always a demand for finish nailers. Paired with the fact they require much less energy to drive small finish or brad nails into place, you have a recipe for success.

    Grex Cordless Comparison Side-By-Side

    Just like the framing nailers above, most cordless finish nailers come in the same two variations, either with fuel cell and battery, or powered by battery only. Grex recently launched the GC1850 cordless brad nailer, which is powered by fuel cell and AAA battery power only! Don't worry about constantly replacing those AAA's in the Grex either, this cordless brad nailer is rated to run up to 50,000 shots per battery cycle.

    Looking at fuel cell finish nailers, Paslode once again leads the industry with its lineup of lithium-ion tools. Introduced to replace the aging line of Paslode Impulse nailers, these new lithium-ion powered tools are lean and efficient. The most recent addition to Paslode is their all-new 18 gauge brad nailer, the IM200Li (918000). Featuring several benefits over its predecessor, the Paslode IM200-F18 (901000), the IM200Li lithium-ion brad nailer offers a lightweight design, long-range battery life, battery standby position to conserve charge, tool free depth adjustment, reversible belt hook, and no mar tip - among other benefits.

    Dewalt DCN660D1 App

    Moving away from the fuel cell, Senco and Dewalt continue to battle for control of the battery-only market. A long-time leader in innovation, the Senco Fusion is available in four cordless variations ranging from 15 gauge finish nailer down to 18 gauge brad nailer. The Senco Fusion cordless system continues to receive praise for its innovative features and proprietary design. However, Dewalt recently answered the demand for better, more powerful batteries when they introduced the 20V MAX lithium-ion battery pack. Built to compete with Senco's Fusion, we've seen a growing demand for Dewalt's new product(s) - which includes their DCN660D1 16 gauge cordless finish nailer.

    The Verdict:

    Only time will tell the ultimate winners in this extremely competitive segment of cordless tools. As new technology continues to emerge, we expect to see several new products come to market in the next calendar year. We also predict a full transition to lithium-ion batteries, for those brands still offering NiCad models or similar.

    Senco Fusion F-15

    And, if you're a diehard air tool enthusiast, there's good news for you too. Despite advancements in cordless technology, we don't foresee pneumatic tools fading into the abyss any time soon. With a network of contractors and tradesmen that swear by pneumatic nailers and staplers, we have a hunch these tools will also benefit from enhanced technology and performance.

    So, would you consider cordless?

     

    ~The Team At Nail Gun Depot

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  • Everything You Need To Know About Cordless Nailers

    Are you looking for a cordless nailer, stapler or screw gun? Maybe you don't like the noise or cord restrictions that come with an air compressor? While pneumatic tools will always have a place in the construction industry, several contractors and DIYers have come to adopt cordless fastening tools over their air-powered counterpart. The biggest benefit to cordless, it goes anywhere you need it to. No hoses, no compressor, no hassle - as long as you have the tool charged that is. Find out what types of cordless nail guns, staple guns, and screw fastening systems are available, when you visit the Nail Gun Network.
    Cordless Nail Guns
    Cordless technology in the fastening industry is improving daily. As battery technology and tool engineering continues to enhance itself, nailers are becoming more powerful, holding a longer charge, yet building the same reputation for durability and ruggedness that pneumatic tools have earned. With cordless framing nail guns, finish nailers, carton closing staplers, and screw guns available - there are several cordless options to choose from.

    Nail Guns

    Cordless nailers come in a variety of shapes and sizes. From framing nailers such as the Paslode CF325Li (replaced by Paslode CF325XP), to finish and trim nailers such as the Senco Fusion, contractors and DIYer's have come to love these tools for their increased versatility and quiet operation. One big thing to remember if you are considering a cordless nailer - several models require the use of a fuel cell in addition to a battery pack. A fuel cell is a small canister of compressed gas that releases energy in conjunction with the tool's trigger being fired. This is especially necessary in larger nailers that require more energy to fire. Taking it one step further, keep in mind that one size doesn't fit all when talking about fuel cells. Each manufacturer will specify the correct fuel cell for their tool. Smaller finish and trim nailers, such as the Senco Fusion line, do not require fuel cells since they do not require as much energy to sink a nail to its proper depth.
    Cordless Brad Nailers
    Spoiler Alert: Grex has announced the launch of an all-new 18 gauge cordless brad nailer, powered by battery and long-life fuel cell. This tool is lightweight and nimble - we anticipate it to be extremely competitive with other similar models currently on the market. Expect an official release sometime in 2015.

    Staple Guns

    Cordless staple guns are growing in popularity, but are not as common as their not-so-distant relative, the nail gun. Bostitch recently released three new cordless carton closing staplers, the DSW-3522, the DSW-3519 and the DSC-3219. These cordless staplers run on a 12 volt lithium-ion battery, capable of securing 800 staples per 45 minute charge. In general, these Bostitch tools are particularly useful in high-production packing and shipping facilities. For those looking to avoid a power supply completely, there are also several manually operated models.

    Screw Guns

    Quite possibly the most popular cordless option of the three types of fastening tools we've covered, cordless screw gun sales are growing at a rapid pace. In particular, Senco's DuraSpin cordless screw system(s) are among the most recognized collated screw guns in the industry. Senco DuraSpin cordless models are powered by the same 18 volt battery pack that can be found on the Senco Fusion, designed to drive between 500 and 700 collated DuraSpin screws per charge. Simpson Strong-Tie also recently partnered with Fein, to release the first cordless screw gun motor for their Quik Drive auto-feed screw system. The Fein motor is compatible with all Quik Drive auto-feed attachments.
    Senco DuraSpin Cordless
    In wrapping things up, it's only fair to cover the counterpoints in going cordless too. The biggest downside to cordless - the cost. Plan to spend anywhere from $100 to $300 more for a cordless nailer, stapler or screw gun, over the cost of its pneumatic or electric counterpart. If you are only using cordless tools, part of this cost can be offset by eliminating the need for an air compressor. The other point to consider before switching to cordless, be sure to plan for enough battery charge to keep your tool running throughout the duration of your project. Keep a car charger or spare battery on hand for larger projects, especially if you are planning to use the cordless tool for extended periods of time. If required, keep an extra fuel cell handy too.
    All that's left to decide, are you ready to cut the cord?
    Your Fastening Tool Experts,
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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  • Nail Guns - Past To Present

    Nail guns are pivotal to the construction, renovation and manufacturing industries. Without them, production time would increase significantly - and cost to manufacture would go up, but how did these tools come to exist? And how have they progressed over the last 50+ years? Instead of looking at new tools, this week let's step into the past - and see the nailers (and brands) that paved the way for the pneumatic and cordless tools we have today.
     
    We start in the early 1950's, an era known in the United States for post-war prosperity. Service men were home, and were using technology from the battlefield to improve the quality of everyday life during peacetime. With American suburbs popping up sporadically (and fast), home builders needed something more than the hammer and nail to keep up with demand. Likewise, a group of men discovered that the technology behind their machine guns from WWII could be applied to a pneumatic powered tool, the nail gun. Pneumatic staplers were introduced long before the nailer became popular, although both tools run using similar principals of operation.
     
    Senco Pinner Ad from the 1950's
     
    Brands including Paslode, Bostitch and Senco were quick to adopt the technology - although many credit Paslode with developing and launching the first successful pneumatic nailer in the 1970's, the Charger SK-312. The type of fastener that each nailer ran also progressed over time, as new technology such as paper tape strip nails (and other forms of collated fasteners) became available. As time and technology advanced, we eventually saw the release of cordless nailers - otherwise known as battery or gas powered nail guns.
     

    What's next on the horizon for nail gun technology? How can we improve on the tools and fasteners we use today? These are questions that constantly make their way through the research and development labs at these and other manufacturers. Despite the field of work, everyone has their own preference of nail gun manufacturer. While we don't favor one brand to another, Nail Gun Depot offers the best selection of all major nailer and stapler manufacturers. Whether you are looking at a Paslode, Senco, Bostitch or MAX, we carry the tools you need to get the job done right.

     
    Your Source For Nailer Knowledge,
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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  • What's A Framing Nailer?

    Framing nailers are designed to tackle the obvious - framing - but did you know they can be useful for other applications? Uses can include anything from framing to sheathing, sub-flooring, truss building and decks. If you work in a construction or renovation trade, chances are you have worked with a framing nailer at least once. Let's take a look at how a framing nail gun works, its uses, and different options available on the market today.
     
    Paslode CF325Li
     
    One of the most important woodworking tools on a home-building site, the framing gun will allow you to drive framing nails into support structures without hesitation. These nail guns are designed for heavy-duty use - and can drive a row of fasteners faster than many woodworkers can hammer one framing nail. As with any tool, framing nailer safety is one of the most important practices you should follow. For more information on nail gun safety, check out our previous blog post here.
     
    If you are researching different framing nailers, you will find that there are two primary types available - cordless or pneumatic. Cordless framing nailers are powered by a compressed-air fuel cell, paired with a rechargeable battery, such as the Paslode CF325Li (replaced by Paslode CF325XP). The older, more traditional sibling, a pneumatic framing nail gun (also known as air-powered), generates its energy through an air compressor, such as the Senco FramePro 325XP. Either of these tool variations are perfect for the job site. A cordless framing gun will typically cost more than its pneumatic counterpart, however, you will find that it is much more flexible to use, as it isn't restricted to the length of an air hose. Consider how versatile you need your nailer to be when shopping for a new one.
     
    Senco FramePro 325XP
     
    A typical framing nailer will be available with either a bump-fire or single-shot mechanism, which will allow you to select between how you trigger a nail to be driven. Bump-firing allows you to suppress the nailer's trigger and continuously drive nails as the gun moves across a section of wood. Single-firing, on the other hand, requires you pull the trigger each time you fire a nail. As a safety precaution, almost every new nail gun will require that the nose be pressed against a surface, in order to fire a nail.
     
    Hitachi NV83A4
     
    The magazine is another area of consideration, when shopping for a framing gun. Depending on your line of work, you will want to consider the benefit of a strip nailer versus a coil nailer. Typically, construction workers and builders who work in high-volume fastening environments prefer the coil nailer, such as the Hitachi NV83A4, as it allows for a larger magazine capacity - which increases productivity. A DIYer or light-use builder might prefer the strip nailer, such as the MAX SN883RH2 (replaced by MAX SN883RH3), as it is lighter weight, easier to load, and generally a bit more versatile. The biggest consideration between a strip or coil nail gun is magazine capacity - just be certain you are purchasing the correct nail for your gun.
     
    MAX SN883RH2
     
    If you need some help identifying the right nail for your nailer, use our Fastener Finder tool on Nail Gun Depot.
     
    Helping You "Nail" Your Next Fastening Tool Purchase,
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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  • What's New In Innovation?

    As part of our ongoing mission to supply the construction trades with the latest and greatest innovation in tools, we like to update our loyal customers with important trends and product information. As part of our evergreen, growing inventory of tools and accessories, we are proud to offer the following new products:

    • Meet the Dewalt DCN690B (replaced by Dewalt DCN692B) and the DCN690M1 (replaced by Dewalt DCN692M1), 100 percent battery operated cordless framing nailers - the first of their kind. Revolutionary to the nail gun industry, these tools operate on battery power only. The DCN690M1 uses a powerful Lithium Ion battery to maximize output and increase productivity with its versatile design. As with all of the tools offered on NailGunDepot.com, we offer these nailers at a price significantly below many of our competitors. Check out the specs on these nail guns by clicking the above links.
    • Are you familiar with the Spotnails Crossfire Cap Stapler? If so, then you will love the revised and updated version of this tool, now offered as the Stinger CS150. The CS150, much like the previous Crossfire model, can handle 7/8” and 1-1/4” staples, but can now work with up to 1-1/2” staples. It features the same lightweight and durable Crossfire technology, but revised and improved for better service on the job site. The CS150 is perfect for house wrap, roofing felt and foam board. Get yours today at NailGunDepot.com.
    • Have you heard? Senco is now offering a five-year limited warranty on ALL of their Xtreme Pro products. Xtreme Pro models can be found by the “XP” notation at the end of the model name. Senco, known for offering well-built, professional grade tools, stands behind their reputable name by offering this industry-leading warranty on XP models. Keep this in mind when looking for your next nailer or stapler, especially if you are looking for long-term value in your tool.

    Have a product or idea that you would like to see on Nail Gun Depot or this blog, contact us at sales@nailgundepot.com and let us know your thoughts! Check back regularly, as we will update every Tuesday with tips, tools, project ideas and more!

    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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  • How To Use A Framing Nail Gun Or Nailer

    Strip Nailers
    To use a strip nailer, pull back the magazine follower to prepare for loading. Insert the proper nails into the nailer's magazine - see manufacturer specs for fastener information.
    Keep in mind, some nail guns load from the top, while others load from the rear.
    After inserting nails, release the magazine follower to allow for tension on the nails. Now, you will want to attach your air line to the tool.
    To fire, most nailers will require the safety to be depressed against a surface, while the trigger is pulled at the same time.

    Two modes of operation are available, bump fire and sequential operation. Bump firing will eliminate the need to release and pull the trigger after each shot.

    Most nailers also feature an adjustable depth of drive. This allows for flush driving or countersink.

     

    Coil Nailers

    To use a coil nailer, open the magazine basket and front door latch. Inside the basket is an adjustable nail tray. Be sure to set the tray for the length of fastener you are using, to allow for optimal performance.

    Insert nails into the magazine basket. Toward the nose of the tool, you will find a feed pawl. The feed pawl guides nails into the chamber. Be sure to align the collation wire and nail head into the proper grooves.

    Close the magazine basket and door latch, attach your air line, and follow the same steps listed above to fire.

    Always consult the manufacturer's operating manual for exact instructions detailing the specific tool you are using.

     
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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