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Tag Archives: Hammer Tacker
  • Choosing A Staple Gun For Your Project

    Everything you need to know about staple guns. Learn the difference between gauge and crown, what makes one type stapler different from another, and most importantly, which stapler is the best one for you.
    BeA Upholstery Stapler
    What Type Of Staple Gun Do I Need?
    • Construction Stapler: When you think of a staple gun, the first thought that might come to mind is a construction stapler - in other words, not your average office stapler. Most construction staplers look very similar to a nail gun, and they typically aren't far off in operation - that is, until you load your fasteners into the magazine. Construction staplers vary in size, depending on the project you need them for. Finish staplers are great for trim work - while heavy-duty construction staplers can be used for sheathing, cabinet framing, furniture construction and more.
    • Upholstery Stapler: Upholstery staplers and fine wire construction staplers maintain similar characteristics - in fact, there's even a slight category overlap in some 20 gauge models - so it's important that you make sure the tool you purchase is intended for the correct application. Some upholstery staplers are intended specifically for upholstering applications, while others leave some room for versatility. To make upholstering easier, some models of upholstery stapler come with a long nose, for reaching into tight spaces.
    • Flooring Stapler: Flooring staplers, again, look very much like their flooring nailer counterpart. Flooring staplers are designed for the installation of hardwood and engineered wood flooring. Hardwood floor staplers come in two variations - either mallet actuated or trigger actuated. A mallet actuated flooring stapler requires the strike of a rubber mallet to drive the staple into place. Carpet staplers are more of a mixture between hammer staplers and upholstery staplers.
    • Packing Stapler: Carton closing staplers - also known as packaging staplers - are designed specifically for corrugated box closing applications, typically associated with packing and shipping. Carton closing staplers come in several variations, ranging from air-powered (pneumatic), to cordless battery - or even manual - operation. The size of corrugate you are intending to staple will determine the size of staple and stapler you require. For applications in manufacturing or assembly line production, packaging staplers are also available in bench-mounted and clinch stapling variations, designed for repetitive, high-volume use.
    • Hammer Stapler: Hammer staplers, also known as hammer tackers or slap staplers, are manually actuated tools that require the striking of a surface to operate - in the same manner as a hammer. Hammer staplers are generally used in carpet, insulation, housewrap and roofing felt installation.
    • Cap Stapler: Cap staplers are most commonly found in the roofing industry. These specialty staplers operate the same as a regular staple gun, but also drive a plastic cap in tandem with the staple. The cap provides greater holding power and offers added protection for the staple. Cap staplers are used for roofing felt, housewrap, foam board and other select applications.
    Stinger Cap Stapler
    What Crown Stapler Should I Choose?
    • Narrow Crown: Narrow crown staplers are generally used for finish and trim applications, such as molding, trim, cabinets, drawers, fascias and other fine-grained applications. The smaller crown allows the stapler to penetrate a surface without being overly noticeable.
    • Medium Crown: Medium crown staplers are preferred in subflooring, pallet building, vinyl siding, furniture assembly, sheathing and similar applications. A medium crown offers a wider range of clinch, but is not quite as rugged as a wide crown.
    • Wide Crown: Wide crown staplers and staples are intended for heavy-duty use - primarily in construction, for projects in truss building, housewrap, roofing, lathing and more. Look to use a wide crown stapler for many of the same applications as a medium crown, but where it doesn't matter if the staple affects the appearance of your project. Wide crown staples are bulkier, but offer greater holding capability.
    C-Wire Staples
    What's The Difference In Wire (Gauge) Type?
    • Fine Wire: Fine wire staples are the thinnest variation of staple, generally ranging from 20 - 22 gauge in thickness. It's important to note, that the gauge and crown of staple are two different things. The gauge is the thickness of the staple, whereas the crown is the width.
    • Medium Wire: Medium wire staples are generally measured in the 18 - 19 gauge range of thickness. Medium wire will provide more holding power than a fine wire staple, but is not the best option for heavy-duty applications in construction.
    • Heavy Wire: Heavy wire staples are the thickest variation of staple, mostly found in 15 - 16 gauge thickness. Heavy wire will provide the greatest holding power of the three, but will also take up the most area when fastened. Heavy wire staples are good for applications that require stapling to a thick surface.

     

    Other clamp fastening tools serve as extended family to the staple gun, such as hog ring pliers, corrugated fastening tools and flaring staplers; however, these specialized tools are typically intended for industrial use or manufacturing.
    Bostitch Cordless Carton Stapler
    Just as you should with any other power tool, be sure that safety is your top priority when using a staple gun. Always be aware of your surroundings, how you handle the tool, and make sure you are equipped with the proper safety gear.
    ~The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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  • Troubleshooting Roof Damage Caused By Winter Weather

    We've survived another winter. As temperatures continue to rise and spring flowers blossom, some will find that winter has left one final reminder of its presence - roof damage. Find out what you need to look for once the snow has melted, to catch minor issues before they turn into major repairs. Discover how to locate and repair roof problems triggered by winter weather, when you enter the Nail Gun Network.
    Gutter Ice
    While weather in general will gradually take its toll on a roof over time, it's been found that roof problems frequently stem specifically from winter weather. The convergence of warm and cold, ice, and snow increases the amount of wear and tear on a roof. Take a look at these causes for winter roof damage.
    • Ice Dams: As melted snow refreezes and turns to ice, it typically builds up wherever there is an angle or corner in the roof - where the water has room to pool. If gutters are clogged or do not have adequate drainage, this can compound the problem. Ice dams create several potential problems. From a safety standpoint, they present potential danger to anyone that is standing below them, in the event they separate from the roof and fall. From a structural standpoint, ice dams create a significant amount of extra weight collecting at the same spot. Over the course of winter, this can loosen shingles and cause damage to gutters or woodwork that is directly exposed to this weathering agent. The additional weight can also cause structural stress - leading to leaks and possible structural damage.
    • Snow Accumulation: Small amounts of snow can actually insulate from the cold, but large accumulation (especially wet, heavy snow) creates extra weight that puts additional pressure on the roof frame and structure. Heavy snow can lead to cave-ins, collapses and other framing issues. There isn't much that can be done to prevent the amount of snow on your roof, but you can make sure your gutters and drains are flowing properly in the fall, to make sure that as snow melts it can flow away from the roof. Properly ventilating the area directly below your roof - typically an attic or crawlspace - will help to distribute heat equally, allowing snow that has accumulated on a roof to melt evenly and prevent refreezing or uneven snow melt.
    Stinger Cap Stapler
    Once the snow has melted, here's what you need to look for to see just how well your roof held up throughout the winter.
    • Loose Shingles: These are relatively easy to detect. Generally, you'll see any separation from the roof board. If the shingle has become completely separated from the roof structure, it will need to be patched or replaced with a new shingle.
    • Wood Rot: This is harder to detect. Unless a shingle has been completely removed, you probably won't see much rot. The shingle is designed to protect the wood sub-surface, so long as moisture is not able to build up underneath the shingle. In the event of ice damming, you might see damage to trimwork in the corners where ice accumulated.
    • Gutter Flow: If you noticed your gutters overflowed frequently during the winter, it might mean that the flow is being blocked by debris. It could also mean that your gutters are not large enough to handle the flow of water from your roof. It's extremely important to draw the water away from your home.
    • Leaking: Though this might seem like the easiest way to detect trouble, small leaks can often go unnoticed until they become big problems. Obviously, large damp spots on your ceiling will indicate water is coming inside. For smaller leaks, look for bubbling or discoloration in the ceiling. You can also check your attic or crawlspace to look for moisture entry.
    Senco Roofing Nailer
    If you determine your roof is in need of repair, Nail Gun Depot offers a variety of roofing nailers, cap staplers, hammer tackers and other fastening tools for roofing applications. As always, leave it to the professionals unless you have experience working with roofing. Always make safety your top priority.
    Nail Gun Depot will also be celebrating Roofing Month throughout May 2015. Take advantage of special discounts, free bonus items, and special roofing content on the Nail Gun Network.
    Your Source For Roofing Repair,
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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  • The Staple Gun Buying Guide

    Are you shopping for a pneumatic stapler? Maybe you already own one, but want to see what else is out there? If you are researching staple guns, look no further.
     
    As much as we love to talk about nail guns - after all, it's in our name - today, let's take a look at the various staple guns and pneumatic staplers that are available for construction, renovation and manufacturing.
     
    Staples Variety
    Let's start with one of the most commonly referenced segments within the staple gun industry - construction staplers. Available in several variations - depending on the application - you can choose between fine wire, narrow crown, medium crown and wide crown staplers. Fine wire construction staplers are generally used for furniture upholstery, light wood assembly, roof paper and insulation. Using a slightly larger staple, narrow crown staple guns or finish staplers are designed for applications that include: cabinets, casebacks, drawers, sheathing, underlayment, molding and trim. Next in line, medium crown staplers are capable of handling larger, more intense projects including: floor decking, roof sheathing, soft wall sheathing, subflooring, pallet construction, vinyl siding and insulation installation. The last and largest (size) segment of construction stapler, wide crown staple guns are built to handle the toughest of tough applications. These heavy-duty staplers are built for insulation sheathing, wire lathing, housewrap, attaching corrugated to pallets, furniture and cabinet frame assembly, or any other application that requires a wide crown staple. If you are looking for a solid, durable construction stapler, consider the MAX TA238A for smaller finish and trim applications, or the Senco WC150XP for larger projects.
     
    Senco WC150XP
    For less intense projects - primarily those that include upholstering or securing fabric - an upholstery stapler will be your best option. You will find that upholstery staplers commonly overlap with their fine wire construction stapler cousin. If you are strictly planning to use this pneumatic (or electric) tool for attaching upholstery, make sure the tool is specifically designed for upholstering - versus assembly. These staplers are particularly useful for furniture and vehicle upholstery, light wood assembly, dust covers, cabinet backs, felt insulation, roofing felt, molding, bedding and packaging. Our friends at ModHomeEc recommend the Duo-Fast EIC-3118 Electric Stapler (replaced by Fasco-Maestri 7C-16 3/8" Crown Electric Stapler - 63100) for the novice - or a BeA Long Nose Upholstery Stapler for long-term, skilled use. You can read their entire review of Nail Gun Depot here.
     
    Duo-Fast Upholstery Stapler
    For packaging and shipping, carton closing staplers are specifically designed to seal corrugated boxes and packaging materials. These tools are almost always found in warehouses or shipping facilities. For small to medium usage, consider a top carton stapler or plier stapler for package closing. For heavy-duty, high volume use, look to a larger carton closing tool - designed for manufacturing and assembly - such as a bench mounted carton stapler or post bottomer carton stapler. In the Nail Gun Depot shipping department, we are currently using Bostitch's latest cordless top carton closers, the DSW-3519 and DSW-3522.
     
    Bostitch Cordless Carton Closing Stapler
    Hammer staplers, also known as hammer tackers, are most commonly used for carpet, roof paper and housewrap installation. Similar to a hammer, these staplers are actuated each time the user brings the tool into contact with a surface - using a driving force. We recommend a variation of the Duo-Fast hammer tacker (replaced by Powernail HT-750 classic hammer stapler) for carpeting. For roofing or siding, consider a Stinger cap stapler.
     
    Stinger Hammer Cap Stapler
    Interested in flooring staplers? Check out our recent article on Must-Have Flooring Tools.
     
    Powernail Hardwood Floor Stapler
    Branching out from the typical staple gun(s) a builder or remodeler would come in contact with, there are several specialty staple guns available - such as bedding staplers and bar code staplers. Among a class of specialty fastening tools - mainly for manufacturing applications - bedding staplers are used for the production and manufacturing of mattresses and box spring sets. Designed for a different - yet equally important set of applications - bar code staplers (also known as label staplers) are used in construction, pallet/crating, packaging and residential interiors. Designed for stapling bar code tags to lumber, the BeA 380/10-400 is a powerful new addition to Nail Gun Depot's lineup of specialty tools.
     
    BeA Bar Code Stapler
    Need more information about a particular model or type of pneumatic, electric or manual staple gun? Just ask, we're here to help!
     
    Your Staple Gun Source,
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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  • What's A Cap Stapler/Nailer - And Why Should I Use One?

    If you work with housewrap or roofing underlayments, and you are still using a standard hammer-tacker, it's time to think about an upgrade that can improve the quality of your work - and ultimately increase productivity on the job. If you saw the title, you already know we're talking about adding a cap tool (stapler or nailer) to your arsenal. There are quite a few options available, including tools from Bostitch, Senco, Hitachi and Paslode, but one brand that specializes in cap nailers and cap staplers, Stinger Cap Systems' specifically designs their tools for applications that require a cap nail or cap staple.
     
    Stinger CN100
    What's the benefit of a cap fastener over a standard staple? The cap helps to protect and expand the surface area (holding power) of the fastener - which means the fastener is better able to withstand harsh weather conditions - protecting the housewrap or fabric from separating or tearing. Many manufacturers require capped fasteners be used with their wrap or felt, due to the increased strength and protection they provide. Cap tools can also be used for a variety of other applications including foam board installation, carpet padding and more. In other words, these tools are perfect for any material that is thick, but maintains a soft consistency.
     
    Stinger Cap Tool
    If you are looking at cap nailers, there are a couple good options available, which include the Hitachi NV50AP3 and Bostitch N66BC-1; if you are looking to drive a larger and wider range of fasteners. If you are looking for a smaller cap nail (1" to be precise), we suggest the Stinger CN100. Similar to a cap stapler, these tools are designed for roofing, sidewall and insulation board - check with the material manufacturer to determine whether a nail or staple is required for your application.
     
    Senco BC58
    Moving into cap staplers, a few of the more popular options, look to Senco's BC58 cap button stapler, Paslode's CS150 cap stapler, Pneu Tools Rap-A-Cap 58 (RC-58), and of course, Stinger brand cap tools - including the CH38 (manual fire), CH38A (auto fire) and CS150 (air-powered) cap tools. Depending on the material - and surface it is being installed to - you will need to determine whether a nail or staple is necessary for your application.
     
    Paslode CS150
    Before you buy a cap tool, be sure to consider these factors: manual vs. auto-firing tool; the role that tool weight and balance plays on your application; and the level of maneuverability required for the job. For heavy-duty, high-volume use, you will most likely choose an auto-fire cap tool. The benefit to a manual cap stapler, such as the Stinger CH38, the tool is lightweight and smaller in size - which makes it easier to maneuver. For most pneumatic variations of cap stapler, plan on any of the tools previously mentioned weighing between four and five pounds - before caps and staples have been loaded. Pneumatic tools also require an air compressor to operate, another factor that should be taken into consideration depending on the flexibility of your jobsite.
     
    Stinger CH38
    Need additional help? Let one of our trained technicians guide you to the perfect cap tool for your project.
     
    Capping Your Fastening Tool Knowledge,
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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