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  • Within Reach: The Quik Stik Rafter and Truss Fastening System

    For contractors who fasten rafter and truss-to-top plate connections, falling is a potential safety hazard. The Quik Stik Rafter and Truss Fastening System from Simpson Strong-Tie resolves some of issues associated with overhead fastening, making it safer and simpler to get the job done without the need for a ladder.

    The Simpson Strong-Tie Quik Stick Rafter and Truss Fastening System Being Put to Use

    How Does the Quik Stik Work?

    The Quik Stik System is a screw driving extension tool that attaches to a drill or driver with a minimum 1,200 RPM−including cordless screw drivers. To use the tool, insert the Quik Stik’s hex-drive shaft into the drill or driver motor’s chuck. Then push down on the head of the tool to expose the magnetic bit holder, and insert the T30 driver bit until it clicks. Ensure everything’s properly connected by doing an installation motion, sliding the drive shaft though the guide sleeve while running the motor. When you're all set, insert the compatible Strong-Drive SDWC truss screw into the head and you’re ready to go. 

    Like many of the screw driving systems from Simpson Strong-Tie, the Quik Stik makes the fastening process considerably faster and more convenient. With this particular innovation, Simpson Strong-Tie asserts the Quik Stik is essentially "eliminating the need for ladders, power nailers and compressor lines.” It's certainly a step up for those who do a lot of overhead fastening.

    The rafter and truss fastening system has been evaluated and approved for five different types of installations: offset from stud (underside of top-plate, bottom edge of top-plate), wide face of stud, narrow face of stud, and front corner of stud (compound angle). Click here to see more specifics about Quik Stik approved installations.

    Safety Improvements with the Tool

    One of the most obvious issues with rafter and truss applications is the reach factor. You’ll likely need a ladder to fasten those connections, and with that comes with risk of falling. This tool provides a minimum of 43” extension for screw driving, so for most wall heights, you can forgo the ladder. If you use a cordless screw driver with the Quik Stik, you don't have the hassle of a cord, giving you greater freedom and mobility.

    Another benefit of the tool is that, since you can work from the interior of a structure, you won’t have to lug a ladder outdoors—or have to contend as much with the elements. So there's less potential for slipping, tripping and dropping.

    Also, you don’t have the heft of a pneumatic tool, thanks to the extension tool’s weight. Not including the motor you choose, the tool weighs about 6 lbs. This means less strain from lifting a tool overhead, which could lead to inaccuracies in fastener placement. The Quik Stik has a comfortable, rubberized grip; it’s really a well thought-out solution for driving screws overhead.

    Special features onthe Quik Stik

    Unique Features on the Quik Stik

    You’ll notice the special positioning prongs on the head of the tool, which is over-molded with nylon. The prongs help securely grip the top plate while driving screws. The manufacturer has also included a bubble level that can be positioned along the handle or tool's head. The level may be angled, and even removed.

    On the head of the tool, there are bright-orange guidelines to help direct the screw to the optimal angle for truss and top-plate to rafter connections. An orange centerline guide on the Quik Stik's head is useful for locating 90-degree angles in vertical connections. Rocker arms on the head let you adjust for precision fastening.

    When you pull back on the tool's head, this exposes the screw, letting you see exactly where you're going and preventing mis-installation. And, should you need to remove a screw, set the driver motor to reverse and just unscrew the fastener.

    The Strong-Drive SDWC Screw, Compatible with the Quik Stik

    Quik Stik's Compatible Fastener

    As mentioned, the Quik Stik drives the specially designed Strong-Drive SDWC truss screw. The 6” screw is fully threaded, engaging the entire length of the fastener. A cap-head on the screw allows it to be countersunk into double top plates. The SDWC screw also has a type-17 point for easier starting and driving.

    The screws are code-listed under IAPMO –UES ER-262 and are tested in accordance with ICC-ES AC233 and AC13 for wall assembly and roof-to-wall assembly. With a bright-orange coating, the truss screw is easily visible and has a wide “tolerance” on angle installations, making it easy to install in a variety of positions.

    Those familiar with the Quik Drive auto-feed systems from Simpson Strong-Tie will be curious about fastener collation. The Quik Stik system drives one screw at a time, so you won't be able to use collated screws. But who knows; perhaps Simpson Strong-Tie has already considered a solution for that, too.

    Quik Stik Fast Facts

    • Applications: Rafter Assembly/Truss-to-Top-Plate Connections
    • Approved Installations: Offset from stud (Underside of Top-plate, Bottom edge of top-plate), Wide face of stud, Narrow face of stud, Front corner of stud (compound angle)
    • Fasteners: Strong-Drive SDWC Truss Screws
    • Screw Driver/Drill Motor: 1,200 RPM or Greater
    • Driver Bit: T30 6-Lobe
    • Attachment Weight: 6 lbs.
    • Driver Bit Included: Yes

    Are you ready to reach higher with the Quik Stik Rafter and Truss Fastening System? We’re certainly up to the task.


     

    Shop Nail Gun Depot:

    Quik Stik Rafter and Truss Fastening System

    Strong-Drive SDWC Truss Screws

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  • Cordless Nailers: Comparing Gas- and Battery-Powered Nail Guns

    There’s no question that cordless nailers have come a long way from the late 1980's, when Paslode introduced the first cordless framing gun. Despite technology advancements in almost every facet of the industry, there's still one dividing line in cordless nailing—compressed gas fuel combined with a battery—or battery-only power. Two very similar concepts with very different means for operation. Understand the differences before you buy.

    An example of gas-powered cordless nailers, the Paslode CF325XP Framing Nailer

    Gas-Powered Cordless Nail Guns

    Also known as fuel-powered or gas-cartridge nail guns, gas-powered nailers rely on combustion. These types of nailers were designed to mimic pneumatic nail guns, by using compressed gas fuel in combination with a battery.

    To shoot a fastener, you press the tool nose against the work surface, fuel goes into the combustion chamber, and mixes with air from the tool’s fan. When you pull the trigger on this type of nail gun, a spark plug near the battery lights the gas-air mixture. The combination of fuel and air forces the piston and the driver blade downward, which fires the fasteners.

    The first tool of this kind was invented by Paslode. They introduced the Impulse model in the late 1980s, and the technology behind it is still in use today. You can see this kind of system in several different nailers, including the Paslode CF325XP cordless framing nailer and the Grex GC1850 brad nailer, for example.

    As you might imagine, it requires more energy to drive a framing nail than it takes to sink a brad. This translates to the size of battery and fuel cell your tool may require. For instance, the Grex cordless brad nailer uses two AAA batteries to ignite its small, cylindrical finish fuel cell.

    An example of battery-powered cordless nailers, the Bostitch BCN680D1

    Battery-Powered Cordless Nail Guns

    In recent years, there's been a push to eliminate the gas fuel cell, and use a more powerful battery as the nailer's sole source for power. The battery powers a spinning flywheel, which drives the motor. As long as the trigger is pressed, the flywheel stays in motion, which allows for rapid or bump firing.  With the Bostitch BCN680D1 18-gauge brad nailer, for example, a 20V Li-Ion battery alone powers the tool.

    New innovations strive to make battery-powered tools increasingly lighter and more agile. Some battery-powered nailers even utilize similar design elements comparable to an air-powered nailer, to power the tool. The Senco Fusion finish nailer, for example, uses a permanently sealed air cylinder, which stores energy as compressed air. This type of nail gun works similarly to a pneumatic, but without the need for fuel, instead using the battery to do the heavy lifting.

    Bostitch claims that by switching to an all-battery-powered model, pneumatic tool users save up to 20 minutes a day in setup. They also state that gas-powered tool users can save up to $15 per week in fuel cells and cleaning/lubricating costs. That's something to take into consideration when high-volume production is a requirement.

    Associated Costs of Cordless Nailers

    Let’s look at an important aspect of comparison—cost. A lithium-ion battery will cost around $100, and a battery charger will run you about $50. If the tool comes without a battery, you’ll need to get one. Having at least one backup battery is highly recommended too.

    One thing many people fail to consider when purchasing a tool is the continued cost of ownership. Batteries have a limited lifespan, so eventually those will need replacing. A battery for a cordless tool will last approximately 3 years or 1,000 charge cycles. 

    For gas-powered nailers, expect to pay about $13 to $15 for a single fuel cell. While fuel cell life can differ depending upon size and application of the tool, most deliver 1,000 to 1,300 shots. Metabo HPT estimates that, for skid of 200,000 nails, you'll need about 200 fuel cells. That comes out to approximately $1,796.

    Example of gas-powered cordless nailers, an Aerosmith Track Pinner In Use

    Convenience of Cordless Nailers

    The obvious benefit of owning cordless nailers is that you don’t have to worry about getting a compressor or being tied to an outlet. That also eliminates a safety hazard in potentially tripping over air hoses or cords. There’s also no need to worry about choosing the fittings or hoses (or even tool oil) to work with your tool, so you can leave those out of the equation.

    A battery-only powered cordless nailer means a single power source, which is one less thing to worry about. The downside of course is that the tool's sole reliance on it will drain the battery quicker, unlike with a gas-and-battery-powered nailer. So, you should plan to keep at least one spare battery on hand at all times. Also, a large battery means added tool weight. If you’re working at challenging angles, such as overhead, you'll notice it.

    One other thing to consider, a gas-powered nailer can typically run longer than a 100% battery-powered model, since it has two sources of energy working together. For a quick overview, here are some of the pros and cons between both types of cordless nailer.

    Gas-Powered Nailer Pros/Cons:

    Pro: Gas-powered cordless nailers tend to run longer between re-charging than their all-battery-powered counterparts.

    Con: You need two accessories (battery and fuel cell) to power the tool. Some people also find the odor of gas tools annoying, though some brands like Grex now offer odorless fuel.

    Battery-Powered Nailer Pros/Cons:

    Pro: Battery-only nailers eliminate the costs associated with gas fuel cells. Simply charge up and start working. Most battery-only nailers also eliminate the aggravating "ramp-up" time required by gas-powered tools, which equates to time saved.

    Cons: Battery-only nailers typically have a larger battery pack, since the tool is running exclusively on the energy generated by the battery. This allows them to go longer between charging, but adds weight to the tool. Some systems, such as Metabo HPT's MultiVolt, allow the user to switch between an electric power cord and battery.

    Which type of cordless nailer do you prefer? Let us know in the comments. Questions? Contact Customer Service.


     

    Shop Cordless Nail Guns at Nail Gun Depot

     

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  • Metabo HPT's Revolutionary New MultiVolt System

    When a new tool hits the market, it rarely earns the title “game changer.” Well, the MultiVolt system from Metabo HPT lets you choose corded or cordless power—within the same tool—creating a whole new game entirely.

    The first of its kind, the revolutionary system even won the Pro Tool Innovation Award. Now available at Nail Gun Depot, the MultiVolt platform offers unheard-of flexibility, portability, and safety in using a tool in various work spaces. Metabo calls it, “The future of power tools,” an assertion that seems pretty on point.

    Metabo HPT System's 36 V Battery

    The MultiVolt Battery

    At the heart of the system is the 36V/18V battery (372121M), which powers any of the tools—from circular saws and slide grinders to rotary hammers and impact wrenches. The 2.1 lb. lithium-ion slide-type battery can also be used with 18V Hitachi and Metabo HPT tools. It’s backward-compatible, so the cordless Hitachi/Metabo HPT tools you already own aren’t suddenly obsolete.

    This innovative battery has a high-cell-capacity battery of 21700 cells, which is 46% greater than standard Li-Ion batteries. That amounts to 1440W, thoroughly increasing tool power and run time. When using the 36V tools, the battery delivers 4 amp-hours of run time; with the 18V tools, it delivers 18 amp-hours.

    Unlike with earlier Li-Ion batteries, a four-stage gauge on this one tells the percentage of battery life remaining. Purchase the battery alone or with a rapid charger (UC18YSL3B1), which powers up the battery in 52 minutes or less. Confident in its durability, Metabo HPT guarantees the 36V battery with a two-year warranty, and the charger one-year.

    The 36V AC Adapter for the Metabo MultiVolt System

    The MultiVolt Adapter

    The system’s ET36A AC adapter is the muscle, and it’s got brains to boot. If you’re working without access to a power outlet or the battery is running low, simply insert the ET36A adapter. It slides into the tool just as the 36V battery. 

    The MultiVolt adapter produces a max of 2,000 watts, comparable to traditional 15-Amp AC tools. A 20-foot cord on the adapter can connect to extension cords and generators with little or no reduction in power, thanks to brushless technology, which we’ll touch on later.

    In describing the award-winning adapter, Pro Tool states, “As we see more corded tools fall to the wayside as cordless tools meet or exceed their power level, more Pros keep asking for hybrid power options. Metabo HPT (formerly Hitachi) answers the call with their ET36A MultiVolt adapter.”

    The only limitation (aside from a cord) we see with the MultiVolt Adapter, it is not interchangeable with other Hitachi/Metabo HPT 18V cordless tools, whereas the 36V MultiVolt battery can be used with 18V cordless models.

     

    Metabo HPT MultiVolt System 36V circular saw

    MultiVolt Tools at Nail Gun Depot

    On the home front, we’re excited to be carrying the MultiVolt AC adapter, 36V/18V battery, the battery & rapid charger set, and tools including—the 7-1/4” Circular Saw (C3607DAQ4M) and the Reciprocating Saw (CR36DAQ4M).

    With the 36V reciprocating saw, you can expect a curved wood blade, 1-1/4” stroke length, slim profile and orbital action. A 4-stage selector on the saw ranges from 1,700 to 3,000 SPM (strokes per minute). The 36V Circular Saw comes with a 24T blade and blade wrench, and features fast braking, bevel adjustment, and a dust blower. Both saws are available from us with a battery and charger, and feature brushless  technology.

    What does a brushless motor add to the equation? It makes the tools ultra efficient, delivering more power, greater durability, and lessening maintenance issues.

    Will you invest in the new MultiVolt lineup—or stick to your (18V or corded) tools? Let us know in the comments.

     


     

    Shop Power Tools On Nail Gun Depot

    Shop Metabo HPT MultiVolt Tools & Accessories

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  • 6 Tips: Preserving Tool Battery Power in Cold Weather

    Cordless tools are more common than ever these days, and what’s more, they keep improving as manufacturers continue to innovate. You’ve probably noticed that Lithium-Ion battery power has surpassed NiCad (nickel-cadmium) and NiMH (nickel metal hydride) in cordless tools—and nearly everything else we use. But in cold weather, Li-Ion batteries seem to lose steam. We'll help you preserve power in your cordless tool battery with 6 easy tips.

    Dewalt DCN693M1Li-Ion Cordless Metal Connector Nailer at Nail Gun Depot

    Benefits of Lithium-Ion Batteries

    Lithium-ion batteries have many benefits over their predecessors; they store a larger amount of electricity, have a lower rate of self-discharge, and are more compact/weigh less than other rechargeable batteries. These cordless tool batteries aren’t delicate flowers, but they do have more basic requirements for maintaining optimal performance. You may have noticed, for instance, that your Li-Ion-powered tool is a little less forgiving in colder weather.

    Batteries are a collection of chemicals and other materials assembled to create a reaction that will then power your tool. And chemicals inside of them can be impacted by extreme situational changes. On the plus side, if you can call it that, Li-Ion is more stressed by extreme heat than extreme cold. Protection circuitry mainly prevents over-heating. but It's up to you to prevent over-cooling.

    Here’s a fact: When the temp dips below 40°F, Li-Ion batteries don’t fully hold a charge. And trying to charge them at that temperature can permanently affect run-time. So, what to do?

    Preserving battery power, as in a Senco Lithium Ion 18 V Battery

    How to Preserve a Li-Ion Tool Battery in Cold Weather:

    1. Store (and charge) batteries within the temperature range recommended by the tool manufacturer. While you can discharge a tool battery in extreme cold, charging it in freezing temps (32°F or colder) is a no-no. You may not see the damage, that doesn’t mean it’s not happening inside the battery.

    2. If a Li-Ion battery has fallen below 40°F, place it in a room-temperature area for an hour or two and let it warm up. What is room temperature? About 72°F, give or take a few digits.

    3. Optimal temps aren’t always available job sites. When not using the Li-Ion tool battery in cold weather, remove it and place in a pants pocket to transfer some body heat to the battery. Another option is to use a gel warmer in the tool bag while it’s in the work car/truck.

    4. Don’t let a Li-Ion battery completely discharge before re-charging it. Unlike older battery types, Li-Ion doesn’t need to be completely drained/re-charged. Li-Ion batteries suffer from little to no “memory effect,” or low-charge capacity when continually charged from a partially charged state.

    5. Once you start to feel power lagging, swap out the battery with a spare and recharge the first one. Having a few spare batteries on hand will keep you powered up. Yes, you should have a spare battery. And yes, we sell those at Nail Gun Depot.

    6. When it’s time to store the battery for an extended period, leave 40% to 50% life in it. This helps keep it stable and keeps the circuit protection operational. Store the battery in a cool (40°F to 60°F), dry area on a plastic or wood (not metal) shelf. 


     

    Shop Cordless Tools

    cordless nailerscordless staplers and accessories, and cordless screw guns

    Shop Batteries

    Metabo HPT (Hitachi) batteries, Dewalt batteries, Senco batteries, and Bostitch batteries

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  • The Year in Review - Our Top 10 Blog Articles of 2018

    Nail Gun Network's Best of 2018

    As the year begins to wind down, it's time to reflect, and review the stuff our readers found most interesting. Below are our Top 10, most-read articles of the year. If you missed any, just click the links to get caught up! And thank you for being a loyal reader.

    1 The Difference Between Siding VS. Framing Nail Guns

    There’s no denying our article on these the two large-bodied nail guns drew a lot of interest. Siding and framing nailers may look similar, but they do serve different purposes—and take different fastener lengths. In February, we explained why the two are occasionally interchangeable, and why it’s sometimes better to invest in the right tool for the job.

    2 Hitachi Power Tools To Become Metabo HPT

    Next on our list was the announcement that Hitachi’s huge re-branding, announced in March. After being acquired by an investment firm, they sought to differentiate themselves, changing their name to Metabo HPT, as well as ushering in a new logo. While the name and face have changed (and part numbers, FYI), be assured their product quality will remain the same.
    Many fans of Hitachi had feelings about the change. If you did, share them in the comments!

    3 Do Systainer Air Compressors Stack Up To Competition?

    In March, we looked at how some of the new Systainer air compressor systems stacked up, and you took notice. Both Cadex and Rolair came out with their own competing takes on the sleek setups. Making air compressors more rugged and mobile sounds like an all-around good idea. In this article, we looked at the cost and convenience of upgrading and whether was a “square deal.”

    4 Easy Tips To Install Shiplap

    And you thought the trend of applying rustic wood siding to walls (and ceilings!) had already sailed. Turns out the popular home design treatment is still cruising along. After all, the look has a timeless appeal, and with the right tools, installing shiplap makes for a very doable home improvement project. In this August blog article, we offered up some tips for completing your own ship-shape shiplap project.

    Framing Nailer And Tools of 2018

    5 Installing Subfloors: Nails Vs. Screws

    For subflooring applications, we weighed the pros vs. cons of using one fastener over another. We compared aspects of speed, cost, durability and holding power. The battle of nails vs. screws continues, though a relatively new nail-screw hybrid may throw an interesting wrench into the debate.

    6 How to Load: Top Vs. Bottom-Loading Staple Guns

    Early in the year, we covered a seemingly simple topic—how to load your staple gun. For wood and upholstery professionals, the pneumatic staple gun is the tool of choice, but staples are some of the most confounding fasteners. The where and why of loading isn’t always so obvious, especially to the first-time staple gun user. In this post, we supplied simple step-by-steps for getting your stapler ready for work.

    7 Is Hitachi's Cordless Pin Nailer A Game Changer?

    Before shaking up the industry with their massive re-branding, Hitachi introduced an exciting new tool for the year—the 100% battery-powered NP18DSAL 23 gauge cordless pin nailer. The ability to drive 3,000 pins per charge at a rate of 2-3 pins per second was news. We were intrigued by the tool’s features, including its no-push sequential firing. Apparently, so were our readers. Did you invest in the Hitachi (we mean Metabo HPT) nailer? If so, let us know in the comments.

    8 Under Pressure — PSI, CFM & Air Fittings Explained

    Do you know how your air compressor works? Or what the PSI of your tool means? We're not here to judge. We see the acronyms all the time, but don’t always have time to investigate. In our July article on common air compressor and air tool specs, we did so. Because the more you know…

    9 Paslode Hardienails: No Studs Required

    Fiber cement siding is not a new application. In fact, it’s been around for more than 100 years. But a durable new fastener, made of stainless steel, may significantly upgrade the installation process. And the bonus part—you don’t need to fasten the nails to the studs, relieving siding installers from several time-consuming parts of the process.

    10 Top Cold Weather Nail Gun Accessories

    Our final top-10 post of 2018 happens to have very good timing. Last winter, we suggested some must-have tools and accessories for working in cold weather. Let’s face it—just because we feel like going into hibernation mode, doesn’t mean work comes to a grinding halt. With the right tool oil, fuel cell and hose, you can maintain the same level of efficiency. In this article, we offered up some tips on how to keep your tools up to speed, even when the Fahrenheit takes a dive.

    Planning any big (or even small) projects this winter? Let us know!

     

    ~ The Nail Gun Depot Team

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  • The 2018 Holiday Tool Buying Guide

    Somehow, December's crept up and it's already time to grab a holiday deal for your favorite woodworker! If you've got a tool nut on your list, we've got you covered.

    NGD Christmas Guide

    You can find an affordable gift for the carpenter, flooring installer, upholsterer or all-around handyman in our holiday tool guide, below. Psst: Special sale prices—and stocking stuffers—are only around while supplies last.

    Now, without further delay, Nail Gun Depot’s 2018 Gift Guide...

    Under $150—Flooring Tool, Micro-Pinner, & Upholstery Stapler

    We love the Freeman PFBC940 Mini 4-in-1 Flooring Tool, not just because it doubles as nailer/stapler, but also because it's completely affordable. The versatile tool drives narrow-crown staples and brad nails from 5/8” to 1-5/8” in length. So you can switch from woodworking to flooring like a boss.

    Stocking Stuffer: Free 50’ air hose, complete with fittings.

    Grex tools' dependability and power are practically legendary. The robust P635 23-gauge headless nailer features an auto-adjust fastener mechanism and a rear-exhaust with silencer. Part of a special holiday gift set, this micro-pinner's industrial-grade, yet lightweight design, is suitable for craft projects, decorative trim, and light furniture assembly.

    Stocking Stuffer: Free edge guide, a $30 value.

    Powerful but lean at 1.7” wide and 2 lbs., the German-made. BeA 71/16-421 upholstery stapler drives 1/4" to 5/8" staples with gusto. Great for handling trim work, bedding, upholstery, and cabinetry, this dexterous little tool is reliable and reasonably priced.

    BeA 71 16-421 stapler

    $150 to $300—Fencing Staplers, Brad Nailer, & Tool Belt

    Freeman pneumatic staplers make installing (and repairing) fences more efficient, and easier on the user. The 10-1/2-gauge Freeman PFS105 fence stapler and 9-gauge PFS9 fence stapler feature ergonomic engineering, quick jam releases and top-loading magazines, not to mention they're relatively lightweight. The 9-gauge nailer includes an optional T-handle for greater control.

    Stocking Stuffer: Free 50” hose with fittings & special holiday price.

    For those who appreciate the quality and dependability of Hitachi/Metabo tools, the NT50A5 PRO 18-gauge brad nailer is a great choice for the carpenter. Ideal for crown molding, paneling, and window casing, it's powerful and versatile. The NT50A5 even has a thumb-actuated duster for easy cleanup.

    Stocking Stuffer: Free stainless steel insulated tumbler.

    Really, just take your pick of Occidental Leather's awesome gear. Their hand-crafted tool holders are made here in America, in Sonoma County, California. The leather is top-grain cowhide and reinforced with copper rivets. For the greatest flexibility, we suggest the OxyLight Adjust-to-Fit Belt, which has a high-mount hammer holder. 

    Occidental Leather Adjust-To-Fit Tool Belt

    $300 and Above—Finish and Framing Nailers, & Air Compressor

    Senco's Fusion series eliminates the need for fuel cells, potentially saving hundreds of dollars per year. The 16-gauge F-16S Finish Nailer features a fast-charging battery and nose-mounted LED light. This powerful straight nailer is perfect for molding, furniture and cabinet framing, and paneling. 

    For framing, the brawny Paslode CF325XP Cordless framing nailer offers impressive battery life and runs in temps as low as 14°F. For finishing, the Paslode IM250A-Li finish nailer has an angled magazine lets you navigate challenging areas. Each tool comes with a carrying case, battery, charger, and more.

    Stocking Stuffer: Free spare battery, plus two fuel cells. 

    Finally, we suggest the AIRSTAK Systainer compressor from RolAir. This compact cubical wonder is ideal for carpentry work that requires mobility and a quiet output (70 dB). The compressor rests in a Systainer case with pull-up handle, and has a removable cord that can be stored inside. The compressor weighs about 30 lbs and delivers 2CFM at 90 PSI.

    Stocking Stuffer: Free RolAir T-shirt and limited-time sale pricing on select models.

    Rolair AIRSTAK Systainer Compressor

    ~The Nail Gun Depot Team

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  • Cyber Weekend 2018 Tool Giveaway!

    Wouldn't it be nice to score a Free Tool when you shop Nail Gun Depot from November 23 – November 26? Coupled with our Cyber Weekend sale, there's even more to be thankful for!

    Purchase any item from the following categories for a chance to win! Prizes are detailed below.

    Power Tool Giveaway for Nail Gun Depot Cyber Weekend Sale

    Cyber Weekend Giveaway Details:

    All orders must be placed between November 23 and November 26. An order number in the specified category/brand counts as an entry. Winners will be featured on Nail Gun Depot's Facebook page and/or Nail Gun Network.

     

    Grand Prize:

    A LiT brand LED-light cooler AND Dewalt heated jacket, PLUS Nail Gun Depot swag. 

    LiT Cooler Grand Prize Nail Gun Depot Cyber Weekend GiveawayDewalt Jacket

     

    Hitachi/Metabo HPT

    Buy any Hitachi/Metabo HPT item for a chance to win a FREE Hitachi DS18DSAL 18V Li-Ion Compact Pro Cordless Drill W/ Flashlight - A compact yet hardworking drill and its bright companion.

    Senco

    Get any Senco item for a chance to win a FREE Senco PC1342 23-Gauge Micro Pinner Kit - A micro-pin nailer and a compressor combo; a winning team for a pro-looking finish.

    Paslode

    Order any Paslode item for a chance to win a FREE Paslode 515600 Brad Nailer - A perfect combination of reliability and versatility engineered into the same tool.

    Dewalt

    Purchase any Dewalt item for a chance to win a FREE Dewalt DWE575SB 7-1/4" Lightweight Circular Saw - Boasting a 15 Amp motor and weighing just 8.8 lbs, it's a lightweight powerhouse.

    Framing

    Order any framing nailer for a chance to win a FREE Martinez 4000 Wood Handle HammerSporting a 19 oz. steel head and curved hickory handle, this hammer packs some punch.

    Flooring

    Get any flooring nailer or stapler for a chance to win a FREE Powernail Power Palm Face Nailer - With a specially designed nose, magnetic nail holder and 160-degree swivel, it's a well-rounded tool.

    Roofing

    Purchase any roofing tool for a chance to win a FREE FallTech 8595A Roofer's Kit - A five-piece set that gives peace-of-mind; includes harness, vertical lifeline, shock absorbing lanyard, and roof anchor.

    Finishing

    Buy any finish/trim gun for a chance to win a FREE Hitachi RB18DSL 18V Cordless Blower and Li-Ion Battery - A great light-duty  tool for clearing debris and wood shavings from your work surface.

    Good Luck! And Happy Thanksgiving to All!

     

    ~ The Nail Gun Depot Team

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  • Cyber Weekend Alert! Our Hottest Deals of the Season

    Mark your calendars; Nail Gun Depot's Cyber Weekend starts November 23! That's when our biggest sales drop, so sink your nails into a few of the previews, below.

    For more specials, see the Cyber Weekend Catalog at Nail Gun DepotGet 'em before they're gone! Offers start November 23, 2018, and run through November 26, 2018 - while supplies last.

    Nail Gun Depot Cyber Weekend Sale

    A Deal a Day = One Excellent Weekend

    5% off NailGunDepot.com Site Wide

    A Hat You Won't Forget

    Cyber Weekend - Free Beanie with Framing Nailer

    Your Coffee's Coolest Keeper

    Free Insulated Tumbler with Any Metabo HPT/Hitachi purchase

    FREE Spares Are The Best Kind

    Free Battery with any Dewalt 20V Max Nailer/Stapler Kit

    Your Favorite Tunes—Even On a Roof

    Free Bluetoth speaker with a MAX framing or roofing nailer

    A Blade or a Hose... Can't Decide? Get Both!

    Blade & Hose Promo

    Winter is Coming.

    Free Cold Air Tool Oil With Senco Framing Nailer or Heavy-Wire Stapler

    To Err is Human, To Remove it is Divine

    Free Staple Remover with Purchase of BeA Upholstery Stapler

    Good Fence Staplers Make Great Fences
    Freeman Fence Stapler Deep Discount

     It's Like the LotteryBut With Tools

    Power Tool Giveaway for Nail Gun Depot Cyber Weekend Sale

    For more Cyber Weekend specials on Cadex, Grex, Makita, Metabo HPT/Hitachi, MAX, Paslode, Senco, and more, see Nail Gun Depot's Cyber Weekend page.

    Know someone else who likes a sweet deal? Share the cyber sale news on Facebook or Twitter!

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  • Prevent Burnout By Oiling An Air Nailer Or Stapler

    Considering how much they can cost, and how hard they work, air tools are really an investment. That’s why oiling an air nailer (or stapler) is so important. It ensures a return on your investment--and that wearable parts, like O-rings, aren't prematurely fried. It's also super easy to do.

    We've tackled a few "burning questions" about oiling an air nailer or stapler to keep them running for years to come.  

    OilingNailer2

    How often should I oil my tool?

    Daily. And if you’re working on an extended project, oil the tool before you start working and again mid-way through the day (after a lunch break, for instance). If the nailer's sat unused for a while, you definitely want to oil it before using it again.

    What kind of oil should I use?

    Only use lubricating oil made specifically for pneumatic tools, such as Senco Pneumatic Tool Oil or Paslode Lubricating OilOther oils lack the correct viscosity or contain ingredients that can destroy the seals, disintegrate O-rings, or may even cause combustion. Keep the WD40, compressor oil, motor oil, transmission fluid, etc. out of your air tools.

    Also, if you’re working in below-freezing conditions, you'll need a tool oil that's formulated for temperatures below 32 degrees Fahrenheit and contains anti-freeze. Try Paslode Cold Weather Tool Oil.

    What oil not to use on an air nailer

    How much oil do I need?

    All you need is 5-10 drops of oil. Drop the oil into the air inlet, the nozzle where your air hose attaches to the tool.

    What happens if I don’t use tool oil?

    The O-rings in the tool will dry up, causing the tool to malfunction. It will also cause unnecessary wear on its components, and potentially cause corrosion. To learn more about maintaining your nail gun, read our post on How to Avoid Destroying Your Pneumatic Nailer

    Pro Tips:

    • Make sure the air tool is OFF before adding oil.
    • Do not oil the tool's magazine, as this attracts dust and dirt. You definitely don’t want any debris stuck in the magazine, which can cause fastener jams.
    • Drain the air compressor at the end of each day. This keeps condensation from building up in the compressor, entering the tool, and then corroding it.

    Have questions? Just contact NGD's knowledgeable customer service.

     


     

    Shop Nail Gun Depot:

    Nail Guns

    Paslode Tool Oil & Accessories

    Staple Guns

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  • Rebuilding A Paslode PowerMaster Nailer

    If you’ve noticed your pneumatic nailer skipping, leaking air or acting sluggish, it might be time for a tune-up. O-rings are among several nailer components that are considered “wearable parts” and are usually not covered by a manufacturer’s warranty. So it bodes well (i.e. saves money in repairs) if you can replace them yourself.

    By fixing your own tool, you gain a better understanding of how it functions. And in just half an hour’s time, your tool should be running like new again.

    Paslode PowerMaster Nailer Rebuild Kit

    We’re rebuilding a Paslode PowerMaster F350 using the 219235 PowerMaster Plus Tool Repair Kit. The kit's instructions are very helpful in rebuilding the Paslode's F-350S (#501000), F-350P (#515000), and F-250S-PP (#500855) air nailers. But, should you need a little visual aid, follow along with us. For extra help, see your specific tool’s manual for the parts diagram.

    Tips:

    • Gather the needed items, below, on a clean, flat surface.
    • Disconnect the tool from air supply, if you haven’t already, and remove any fasteners.
    • As you disassemble the parts, line them up, so you know which order to reassemble them.

    What You’ll Need:

    • Paslode F350 PowerMaster Plus Tool Repair Kit (contains 9 O-rings, 1 cap gasket, 1 sleeve seal, 1 spring, silicone-based lubricant, instructions)
    • Paslode pneumatic tool oil
    • 3/16" hex key (Allen wrench)
    • Snap ring pliers
    • Pick tool or stick pin
    • Clean rag

    Steps:

    1. Using the hex key or Allen wrench, unscrew the four bolts on the nailer cap. Pull off the old gasket.

    2. Using a hex wrench, loosen and remove the head valve.

    Removing Paslode PowerMaster Head Gasket

    Main Valve O-Rings

    3. Using the snap ring pliers, remove the snap ring.

    4. Using a stick pin or pick tool, remove the two O-rings in the main valve.

    5. Add the new O-rings and lightly grease with the silicone-based lubricant (219188).

    Pro Tip: Use only silicone-based lubricant (grease) on the O-rings. Break grease and other types can clog your tool and cause the O-rings to swell.

    6. Place the snap ring back in. Then, remove the old spring, and set it aside to replace later.

    Paslode PowerMaster Nailer O-Rings and Snap Ring

    Head Valve O-Rings

    7. Using a stick pin or pick tool, remove the outer and inner O-rings on the cap.

    8. Using a clean rag, wipe out the old grease on the cap.

    9. Replace the outer O-ring, and lightly grease it.

    Removing an O-ring with stick pin

    10. Remove the inner O-ring and replace with the new. Apply a thin layer of grease to the inner O-ring.

    11. Now, replace the old spring with new (500407). Set the head valve atop the spring.

    12. Apply Paslode tool oil to the outer and inner O-rings.

    13. Press the head valve on the spring, pushing down a few times to work the oil in.

    Post O-Rings

    14. Remove the old O-ring on the post. Add a new O-ring to the post and grease it.

    15. Put the post back into the head valve and use a hex wrench to tighten it.

    Removing Paslode F350 Piston Assembly

    Piston Sleeve O-Rings

    16. Remove the piston sleeve, then remove the piston inner assembly.

    17. Remove the sleeve seal. If the seal is stubborn, use a flat-head screwdriver to pry it off.

    18. Replace the sleeve seal with the new one, popping it into place.

    Replacing Paslode PowerMaster Sleeve Seal

    Flange O-Rings

    19. Remove the flange. You may have to tap gently with a mallet to loosen it.

    20. Remove the fist O-ring from the piston sleeve, then remove the second.

    21. Replace with the new O-rings. Grease only the top O-ring. The bottom O-ring has holes under it that allow air to escape when the tool is functioning, so it should not be greased.

    22. Pop the flange back in.

    Paslode PowerMaster Rebuild: Grease only the top O-ring

    Main Body O-Ring

    23. Remove the O-ring in the body (outer flange) of the tool. Put the new O-ring into the body, resting it on the inner “ledge.” Apply a thin layer of grease to the O-ring.

    Paslode PowerMaster Rebuild Instructions

    24. Put the cylinder back into the tool body, snapping it into place.

    25. Remove the piston O-ring. In this case only, you’ll apply grease to the O-ring BEFORE you place it on the tool. Once greased, place it on the piston.

    26. Place the piston driver assembly back in the tool. Make sure that the piston driver’s bevel tip is pointing in the right direction, facing the nailer handle and magazine.

    Paslode PowerMaster Rebuild Kit Beveled Edge of Piston Driver Assembly

    Pro Tip: if the beveled edge of the driver is not correctly placed, nails will jam/skip when firing.

    27. Put in the new gasket, either side facing up

    28. Replace tool's cap, lining up the stud to fit into the notch. Tighten the screws snugly on the cap. Do not over-tighten.

    Test Firing the Nailer

    Add tool oil to your nailer and reinsert fasteners. Then do a few test fires on a scrap piece of wood to ensure the gun shoots properly and leaks are resolved.

    These instructions coincide with the following tools only: Paslode F-350S (#501000), Paslode F-350P (#515000) and Paslode F-250S-PP (#500855). For additional information, contact an authorized service center. You can find this and other Paslode nail gun repair kits on Nail Gun Depot.

     

    ~ The Nail Gun Depot Team

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