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Tag Archives: hitachi
  • Introducing The Hitachi NR38AK Metal Connector Nailer

    New from Hitachi, a compact joist hanging nailer, the NR38AK seems to frame the future for metal hardware nailers. Find out more about this metal connector nailer, its features and benefits - all on The Nail Gun Network.
    Hitachi NR38AK
    The biggest difference between the all-new Hitachi NR38AK and existing Hitachi NR65AK2 and NR65AK2(s) models - range of fastener. While the NR65AK2 can run 1-1/2" to 2-1/2" metal connector nails, the Hitachi NR38AK Strap-Tite metal hardware nailer is limited to 1-1/2" paper strip metal connector nails only. However, what it might lack in range it makes up in versatility, featuring a narrow (lightweight) body - designed to fit into tight spaces, an adjustable air deflector, and a sequential drive mechanism to ensure precise nail placement. The Hitachi NR38AK offers a built-in secure grip, dry-fire lockout for assured nail placement, and a positive safety that allows the tool to use the nail tip as its guide - without damaging collation. This Hitachi nailer excels in applications involving metal framing hardware, joist hangers, wall bracing and strap ties. Bundle all that with Hitachi's five-year warranty for added peace of mind. Our verdict, the Hitachi NR38AK combines the best in power, price and practicality for its segment.
    ~The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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  • What's The Difference Between An Impact Driver & Power Drill?

    With Father's Day coming up, a new power drill always ranks high for Father's Day gift giving. When you're shopping for dad's new drill, you'll probably come across impact drivers too. But which is the better tool for dad? Discover the difference between an impact driver and a power drill, their uses, and which tool is ultimately the best investment.
    To the amateur eye, an impact driver and a power drill look almost identical. However, while they may look alike, they serve two different purposes. Cutting to the chase, an impact driver will be most useful for someone who frequently has the need to drive large screws into dense wood. You will find that impact drivers come in handy for deck building and repair, installing plywood subfloor, tile backerboard, cabinet installation and similar applications. Contractors typically choose the impact driver as it provides more torque (turning force), generally to the tune of two or three times that of a power drill. Impact drivers combine increased torque with concussive blows (driving screws with high impact intervals), to deliver the force required to drive large fasteners into the densest wood(s).
    Hitachi Impact Driver
    Power drills, on the other hand, don't provide nearly as much brute power as their impact driver cousin. Whereas an impact driver sinks large screws with ease, power drills are not capable of sinking large screws - period - and require a substantial amount of additional force from the user to drive smaller screws evenly. That amounts to more energy required from the user's wrist, which can lead to discomfort during long-term use. Power drills utilize a keyless chuck, meaning they can take a wide-range of round or hex shaped bits. Impact drivers can only take hex shaped driver bits due to their design. Another key distinction, power drills feature a slip clutch that allows a user to select the precise amount of torque they need for an application. If you are looking for something versatile to drill holes and drive smaller screws, you might find a power drill to be your best bet.
    Hitachi Power Drill
    To sum things up, power drills provide decent torque for lightweight fasteners and drilling, but impact drivers will provide the most power for fastening larger screws into dense wood. Power drills are more versatile in the respect that they will take almost any bit type, whereas an impact driver requires hex bits only. Power drills also commonly feature a clutch - impact drivers typically do not, though this trend is gradually changing. Impact drivers will make a bit more noise than their power drill counterpart, but they make up for the noise factor with a compact design for easy transport and storage.
    All in all, the best tool for dad really depends on the type of project he likes to do. If dad is into heavy-duty fastening, the impact driver is probably your best bet. If he likes to tinker around the house with light to medium-duty projects, consider the power drill. Most avid woodworkers will want to keep both tools on hand, so at the end of the day, you really can't go wrong with either of the two.
    Hitachi Hammer Drill
    One last tip to consider, keep in mind the difference between a power drill and a hammer drill too. Hammer drills are designed to provide additional torque from the rear, to drill or drive screws into concrete and other hard materials.
    Your Impact Driving Experts,
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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  • Top Resources For Tool Testing & Comparison

    Looking for a comprehensive overview of features, quality and value for your next fastening tool? Want an expert opinion? Getting the answers you need can be easier than many think - especially in the Internet Age. Let's take a look at some of NGD's favorite sources for tool and fastener reviews. Tested first by the pros - so you can get the best in quality and value.
    Nailers
    For those that still rely on print publications for tool news, these magazines have become a "staple" in workshops across the country:
    Journal of Light Construction - One of the most trusted sources for tool reviews, the Journal of Light Construction (JLC) provides construction industry insight - with a heavy emphasis on the tools that power your projects. Get tips, tricks and unbiased knowledge from the pro's of this industry. JLC covers a wide variety of tools, including reviews for Senco, Bostitch, Hitachi, MAX and other key players within the fastening tool segment. Issues reflect specific industries including roofing, flooring, framing and more.
    Tools of the Trade - A sister publication to JLC, Tools of the Trade (TOTT) strictly focuses on the tools that power construction, renovation and manufacturing operations. Also recognized as a trusted source, TOTT is only published twice per year. However, its online database keeps content available year-round, should you have a specific tool you are researching. Both TOTT and JLC offer in-depth, rigorous tool comparison tests.
    Pro Tool Reviews - Another publication that shares its space in print as well as online, Pro Tool Reviews features reviews and analysis of many popular tools within the fastening industry. Covering all tool segments, Pro Tool Reviews is a great source for tool information - from manual hand tools to power fastening devices. They are also known for their annual innovation awards, where they recognize the best of the best newly launched tools each year.
    Maybe you are more in-tune with the blogosphere? For those that are tech savvy, there's a plethora of tool blogs to choose from - including our own of course! While we have a laundry list of great choices to recommend, we have selected three that frequently review and reference nail guns, staple guns, screw guns, air compressors and other tools pertinent to fastening. A few of our top picks, be sure to check out Tool Skool, Tool Box Buzz and HomeFixated. All three of these online resources are run by industry experts - so you can rest assured you are getting an accurate and educated representation of the tools you need. With project ideas, tool reviews and much more available - be sure to take some time to see what the bloggers have to say about your tool too.
    Nail Gun Network Logo
    Looking for expert knowledge specific to nailers, staplers and screw fastening systems? You can find new tool releases, how-to projects, tool demos, buyer's guides and more - right here on Nail Gun Depot's very own Nail Gun Network. We combine the best tool and fastener information available - announcing up-to-date facts and features on new product-lines, right as they launch. Whether you are looking for a new project to tackle, tips on getting the most out of your tools, or simply want to stay current on tool and fastener news - we've got it all.
    Have an idea or suggestion for the Nail Gun Network? Let us know at Sales@NailGunDepot.com.
    Your Nailer News Experts,
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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  • The Nail Gun Buyer's Guide

    If you've come to the Nail Gun Depot, chances are you know what a nail gun is, what it does, and how it is used. Nailers come in a variety of shapes and sizes, designed to fulfill tasks that range from framing to finishing to flooring - depending on the user's needs. With a variety of options available, which tool is right for you? Find out the features you need, to take on the projects you want to build, right here.

     

    Let's start by covering the types of nail guns or nailers you might encounter:

    From top-to-bottom, the largest of the nail gun family is the framing nailer. Framing nailers are built to tackle large jobs that require heavy duty fasteners (nails) - such as framing, fencing and pallet building. The industries that benefit most from this type of tool include home-building, construction and manufacturing. Similar to the framing nailer, roofing nailers are almost identical in appearance, however these nail guns are designed specifically to fastening roofing shingles.

    For projects that are a bit less intense, finish nailers are recommended for jobs such as door and window trim, paneling, baseboard, casing, crown molding, furniture, shelving and cabinetry. A close relative to finish nail guns, brad nailers drive an even smaller - brad - nail, and are designed for small trim work and furniture repair. Typically, using a brad nail gun will prevent the need for wood putty to cover up a hole where the fastener has been driven - but these nailers can only be used on lighter-duty projects, since the fastener is not as large as a finish nail. Last but not least, a pin nailer might be your best option for crafting or small trim projects, such as cabinet doors and bird house building. For anyone in renovation or remodeling, having a good finish and brad nailer is key to success.

    Designed specifically for hardwood and laminate floor installation, floor nailers are the last of the commonplace nail guns that most contractors or DIYer's will require. These nailers are built to install a variety of hardwood floor sizes and thicknesses. Typically activated with a mallet, floor nailers are only built for flooring applications. Find Your Nailer Now

     

    Pneumatic or Cordless?

    The age old debate between contractors, do I want a cordless nailer or a pneumatic, air-powered nail gun? Most heavy-duty nail gun users swear by pneumatic tools, as they are generally a bit more reliable and do not require re-charging on the job site. The downside to a pneumatic tool, it requires the use of an air compressor. For workshop woodworkers, using nailers such as finish, brad and pin models, a small compressor such as the Senco PC1010 will be more than capable. For heavy-duty, high-intensity use on a construction site, look to a larger compressor such as the Senco PC0970, as it has a larger tank and is capable of providing enough air-pressure for larger tools - including framing nailers.

    If you choose a cordless nail gun, you will need to keep a battery charger handy to keep your tool running - once the battery wears down. Cordless framing nailers also require a fuel cell to provide the necessary pressure to drive a fastener. The benefit to a cordless tool, you can reach beyond the length of an air hose and can get into tighter, hard to reach areas. You also eliminate the need for an air compressor with a battery-powered nailing tool. This is generally the appeal that makes these types of tools desirable to DIY builders.

     

    Terms to look for when shopping for your next nail gun:

    You'll more than likely encounter some - or all - of the following terms, when comparing nailers.One of the most important features you will want to look for, an adjustable depth of drive lets you select how far you want your nail (or other fastener) driven into the object you are fastening. Another option to look for, directional exhaust plates allow you to select the direct your tool shoots it's exhaust - this feature is particularly beneficial in dusty areas. Last, but not least, you will also want to be sure your nailer has a jam clearing feature - to avoid lost time and/or costly repairs if/when your tool jams.

    Depending on the job your are working on, pay attention to features such as trigger size (if you wear gloves while working), easy adjustment for different nail or fastener sizes, and a rugged exterior design to handle the projects you throw at your nailer.

    Keep an eye out for brands such as Senco, Paslode, Hitachi, Bostitch and MAX, as these manufacturers all have a strong track record for building reliable, long-lasting tools. Also keep an eye out for the length of warranty offered by a manufacturer. Most brands will come with a one-year limited warranty, but certain tools go above and beyond - such as Senco's XP (XtremePro) line of nailers that include a five-year limited warranty, or Bostitch's seven-year limited warranty that is offered on select tools.

     

    Your Leading Source For Nail Gun Knowledge,

    The Team At Nail Gun Depot

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  • What's A Framing Nailer?

    Framing nailers are designed to tackle the obvious - framing - but did you know they can be useful for other applications? Uses can include anything from framing to sheathing, sub-flooring, truss building and decks. If you work in a construction or renovation trade, chances are you have worked with a framing nailer at least once. Let's take a look at how a framing nail gun works, its uses, and different options available on the market today.
     
    Paslode CF325Li
     
    One of the most important woodworking tools on a home-building site, the framing gun will allow you to drive framing nails into support structures without hesitation. These nail guns are designed for heavy-duty use - and can drive a row of fasteners faster than many woodworkers can hammer one framing nail. As with any tool, framing nailer safety is one of the most important practices you should follow. For more information on nail gun safety, check out our previous blog post here.
     
    If you are researching different framing nailers, you will find that there are two primary types available - cordless or pneumatic. Cordless framing nailers are powered by a compressed-air fuel cell, paired with a rechargeable battery, such as the Paslode CF325Li (replaced by Paslode CF325XP). The older, more traditional sibling, a pneumatic framing nail gun (also known as air-powered), generates its energy through an air compressor, such as the Senco FramePro 325XP. Either of these tool variations are perfect for the job site. A cordless framing gun will typically cost more than its pneumatic counterpart, however, you will find that it is much more flexible to use, as it isn't restricted to the length of an air hose. Consider how versatile you need your nailer to be when shopping for a new one.
     
    Senco FramePro 325XP
     
    A typical framing nailer will be available with either a bump-fire or single-shot mechanism, which will allow you to select between how you trigger a nail to be driven. Bump-firing allows you to suppress the nailer's trigger and continuously drive nails as the gun moves across a section of wood. Single-firing, on the other hand, requires you pull the trigger each time you fire a nail. As a safety precaution, almost every new nail gun will require that the nose be pressed against a surface, in order to fire a nail.
     
    Hitachi NV83A4
     
    The magazine is another area of consideration, when shopping for a framing gun. Depending on your line of work, you will want to consider the benefit of a strip nailer versus a coil nailer. Typically, construction workers and builders who work in high-volume fastening environments prefer the coil nailer, such as the Hitachi NV83A4, as it allows for a larger magazine capacity - which increases productivity. A DIYer or light-use builder might prefer the strip nailer, such as the MAX SN883RH2 (replaced by MAX SN883RH3), as it is lighter weight, easier to load, and generally a bit more versatile. The biggest consideration between a strip or coil nail gun is magazine capacity - just be certain you are purchasing the correct nail for your gun.
     
    MAX SN883RH2
     
    If you need some help identifying the right nail for your nailer, use our Fastener Finder tool on Nail Gun Depot.
     
    Helping You "Nail" Your Next Fastening Tool Purchase,
    The Team At Nail Gun Depot
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